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Have you suffered from not having a will? Tell us

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Have you suffered from not having a will? Tell us

edited 4 November 2016 at 10:04AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
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MSE_LuciaMSE_Lucia Former MSE
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edited 4 November 2016 at 10:04AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
Hi everyone,

We’d really like to hear from any Forumites who have experienced the effects that not having a will can cause. If you’re happy to share your story, please post in the thread below. If you’ve seen any relevant threads or posts elsewhere on the forum, please do share the links.

We’re looking to do a feature highlighting that whatever your age, if you've assets eg, a house, savings, or a business, and people or others you'd like to look after it, you should consider making a will; and Will Aid month gives you a chance to do it cheaply.

Our feature will be in line with Will Aid month, which is a UK-wide scheme that runs every November, where the charity Will Aid teams up with over 900 solicitors to provide basic wills to people of any age. There's no set fee but Will Aid hopes you'll make a donation of around £95 for a single will (£150 for a couple). This is a good price for a solicitor-drafted will but of course if you can’t afford it, you can give less.

Huge thanks,
MSE Lucia
«134567

Replies

  • FireflyawayFireflyaway Forumite
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    A family member died in an accident. All her assets went to her husband. However.... He didn't change his will to include her family or take into account his recent inheritence and as bad luck had it he also died quite soon after. Everything was then handed to his son, a guy who never visited them, never worked etc in fact I think he had even been in prison. My point is a will is important not just to say who should get your stuff but also who shouldn't!
  • LavendyrLavendyr Forumite
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    A friend of mine's son died of cancer. He had had it for a couple of years, it was stage 4 towards the end (had metastasised) and it was a poor mid-term prognosis but he deteriorated v quickly in a short space of time. He made no will despite knowing he had a poor prognosis. His mother, who had looked after him and cared for him for so long, is entitled to almost nothing (beyond a portion of life assurance from one of his places of employment). His wife, whom he married scant months before his death, benefits from the lot.
  • edited 9 December 2016 at 12:07AM
    PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    edited 9 December 2016 at 12:07AM
    To be frank, we had two, identical - except there was an error.

    Both done at a "proper solicitors", the first to be executed had a huge error in it, rendering it useless and effectively an intestate will .... causing no end of annoyance as we then had to do something else to get it "fixed". Got the solicitor to do it all, bill of £4-5k for sorting it out and the final execution of the will.

    Also, the actual way the Will was set out to be done was a nuisance to us, which, by the time of the death was really not worth the hassle of doing.... but we were forced to do something that was pointless/long-winded and produced no end of faff for us.

    The second one was correct, but we didn't need it as it was the same in the Will as if it'd been intestate. We did it ourselves for a couple of hundred quid.

    In all honesty, we'd have done it quicker, cheaper, easier, if there'd been no wills at all.
  • GersGers Forumite
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    M brother died very suddenly, he had an old will which his solicitor couldn't find. Whilst his executor had a copy it wasn't deemed sufficient (Australia) and it took no end of bother for his wife. They were living apart but still very friendly and he had a floozie who lied and cheated and stole. Bad times.

    Then his second oldest son died this year, aged 34, no will, three very young children, a de facto wife and a pile of debt. More bad times.

    I've made an appointment to update my will. My mum has just checked that her will is still valid as it mentions my now deceased brother. Needs must.
  • Recently my father's cousin died and told alot of people what he had left them in his will, unfortunately to save money he had got a will kit and did it himself, the will he had written was not signed and was therefore invalid.

    As he had no children his estate was split between his cousins many of whom he hadn't seen for 40+ years and others who he didn't like. While most of his intended beneficiaries (who weren't relatives) got nothing.
  • I never had a father when growing up and I have recently had a son which has brought out a very strong paternal side in me.

    I have started thinking often about what would happen I was to die and leave my son Fatherless.
    The only problem is, I don't own anything worth while so was wondering. What is the sort of thing that goes into a will?
    The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today
  • edited 10 January 2017 at 11:25AM
    Rain_ShadowRain_Shadow Forumite
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    edited 10 January 2017 at 11:25AM
    I never had a father when growing up and I have recently had a son which has brought out a very strong paternal side in me.

    I have started thinking often about what would happen I was to die and leave my son Fatherless.
    The only problem is, I don't own anything worth while so was wondering. What is the sort of thing that goes into a will?

    It's simply an expression of where you would like your assets to go when you die so all of them are 'in' the will, either in detail or as a lump sum of what is left after specific bequests.

    Just because you have few assets now it doesn't mean you won't have them in the (near) future.

    You might win the lottery and die from the shock ;)


    It could be your last chance to tell people what you think of them too.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    It's simply an expression of where you would like your assets to go when you die so all of them are 'in' the will, either in detail or as a lump sum of what is left after specific bequests.

    Just because you have few assets now it doesn't mean you won't have them in the 'near' future.

    And you appoint, through your will, the people who you trust enough to deal with things after you die.

    Have you considered who you want to bring up your child if both parents were killed in an accident? You can appoint guardians in your will - as long as there aren't reasons why they wouldn't be considered suitable by social services, your wishes will be complied with.
  • Rain_ShadowRain_Shadow Forumite
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    Mojisola wrote: »
    And you appoint, through your will, the people who you trust enough to deal with things after you die.

    Have you considered who you want to bring up your child if both parents were killed in an accident? You can appoint guardians in your will - as long as there aren't reasons why they wouldn't be considered suitable by social services, your wishes will be complied with.


    Good points.

    I was my father's executor and am my mother's.

    My wife and children are my executors.

    We didn't make wills until our sons were adults so the 'guardian' question didn't arise.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    I never had a father when growing up and I have recently had a son which has brought out a very strong paternal side in me.

    I have started thinking often about what would happen I was to die and leave my son Fatherless.
    Mojisola wrote: »
    Have you considered who you want to bring up your child if both parents were killed in an accident? You can appoint guardians in your will - as long as there aren't reasons why they wouldn't be considered suitable by social services, your wishes will be complied with.

    Rain Shadow - I should have quoted owen's post as well as yours - that paragraph was aimed at the proud new father. :)
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