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Advice needed for PRC inspection certificate

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Comments

  • stator
    stator Posts: 7,441 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    teneighty wrote: »
    Just to clarify to avoid any misunderstandings the house did not need to be "Knocked down". The first floor and roof would be propped whilst sections of the concrete panels were removed and re-built. You often see one side of a pair of semi's re-built in this way where you had a private owner next to a Council property.
    As I said, you either need proof it was knocked down or you need a PRC certificate.
    Anything could have happened to the house, but if you want a mortgage you will need the PRC certificate. They will only grant the PRC certificate if they can see that an approved method of repair was used.

    So yes, you could spend £1000 for a PRC survey and find out that the house is unmortgageable. I'm afraid that's the situation everyone else is in when they buy a house. You just have to accept the possibility of losing money :o
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
  • choginosh
    choginosh Posts: 12 Forumite
    The council are willing to provide proof that it was a licenced repair and the company that did the work are also will to write stating this but I have been told that is not sufficient, so looks like if I want to go ahead I have to pay for the certificate
  • teneighty
    teneighty Posts: 1,347 Forumite
    choginosh wrote: »
    The council are willing to provide proof that it was a licenced repair and the company that did the work are also will to write stating this but I have been told that is not sufficient, so looks like if I want to go ahead I have to pay for the certificate

    That is crazy, why would you pay out a grand to be told something you already know and can prove for free. The valuer doesn't call the shots it is the lender, they set the lending criteria that the valuer works to. Surely it would be better to try a different lender if they wont see reason.
  • stator
    stator Posts: 7,441 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    Everyone who waas involved in doing the repair is bound to say they did a good job. The question is whether the exact method they used is approved by the people who lend money on houses, or not.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
  • teneighty
    teneighty Posts: 1,347 Forumite
    stator wrote: »
    Everyone who waas involved in doing the repair is bound to say they did a good job. The question is whether the exact method they used is approved by the people who lend money on houses, or not.

    But that is all the original certificate would have said if there was one. The certificates were issued by the firm that undertook the repair. They did not guarantee quality just that a licensed repair method was used, they are worthless. As I said before they were just a box ticking exercise to access government grants.

    These retrospective certificates are just cashing in on ignorant valuers and poor lending criteria by mortgage companies. How could one of the firms you listed truly certify the repair unless significant areas were opened up for inspection by a structural engineer? The information available from the Council and the original contractor is just as valid and is free.
  • choginosh
    choginosh Posts: 12 Forumite
    Thank you all for your help. I have passed on the information to my mortgage broker and will see what comes back
  • Hi, we are going through the exact same thing getting our mortgage and the valuer wants the PRC cert. Could you let me know how you got on or do you have any advice please
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