Garden "bits"

edited 31 August 2015 at 4:42PM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    I agree.

    I have built fences, laid paths, created flowers bed, made furniture etc. all on my own in the garden.

    Thank you. I felt sure there would be some people out there, like me, untrained, but willing to give garden projects a go.

    I've just paid someone to install a kitchen, as I think that is too risky when the units cost so much (and I need it before Christmas!) but a garden and the things in it can evolve at a comfortable pace, and there's no huge financial penalty if things aren't perfect.

    Your mention of cold frames reminds me that money was bemoaning the state of her outdoor tomatoes recently. So, there's a project ready and waiting: a polythene-clad frame, capable of housing a few cherry tomato plants. It's been a lousy year for growing heat-loving plants outdoors!
  • bouicca21bouicca21 Forumite
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    Even I could contemplate making a cold frame. Money, maybe try local colleges for evening class in basic woodwork? And if Money has some money, I have heard very favourable accounts of B&Q DIY classes.
  • A friend of ours once made a cold frame out of old car windscreens - because they are curved and very tough they support themselves. However they're not items you find (in one piece) on every rubbish dump :).
  • edited 4 September 2015 at 6:32AM
    DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    edited 4 September 2015 at 6:32AM
    Elsewhere wrote: »
    A friend of ours once made a cold frame out of old car windscreens - because they are curved and very tough they support themselves. However they're not items you find (in one piece) on every rubbish dump :).
    As a child, I used to collect car speedometers; something which my parents regarded as weird, but harmless, mainly because their thinking didn't extend as far as wondering where they came from! :rotfl:

    It was at that time I learned about many car windscreens being laminated - a huge advantage in the garden context, especially with children around.

    The use of found materials is very common on allotments and similar places, where visual attractiveness or being compliant with a particular style is low on the agenda. In a garden, they can create conflict with the ornamental planting.

    I have never tried to solve this. All I do is plonk the ornamental bits in one place and restrict the view out of there into the functional areas. Hiding a polytunnel that's as large as a couple of buses is something even David Copperfield might find a bit bothersome.
  • Davesnave wrote: »
    The use of found materials is very common on allotments and similar places, where visual attractiveness or being compliant with a particular style is low on the agenda. In a garden, they can create conflict with the ornamental planting.

    I have never tried to solve this. All I do is plonk the ornamental bits in one place and restrict the view out of there into the functional areas. Hiding a polytunnel that's as large as a couple of buses is something even David Copperfield might find a bit bothersome.

    Back a bit, in the days of piano smashing contests, Victorian black marble mantle clocks were completely valueless - a colleague of mine built a garden wall out of them - I'm not sure if that counts as found materials or garden ornament! I use glass inserts out of old automatic washing machine doors as pots for my orchids - they look fine on the sideboard. I admit glamming up a huge polytunnel is quite a challange, however.
  • bouicca21bouicca21 Forumite
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    I suppose I am showing my age if I admit it took me a couple of minutes to stop wondering what the Dickens David Copperfield had to do with polytunnels and gardening.
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