Green, ethical, energy issues in the news

edited 12 July 2021 at 11:38AM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
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  • CoastalwatchCoastalwatch Forumite
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    While it doesn't match California's scale of Battery Storage it is still the largest to be proposed in Europe and great that it's in the UK.
    Ok, Scotland actually. But I guess with surplus's already happening and more wind farms planned then it's likely to be in quite some demand by '24!

    Amp Energy gets go ahead for 800MW of battery storage

    Amp Energy is to build what it is claiming are Europe’s two largest grid-connected battery storage facilities, each boasting capacities of 400MW / 800MWh.

    Dubbed the Scottish Green Battery Complex, the facilities are to be locatedd in Hunterston and Kincardine in central Scotland.

    The two are set to be operational in April 2024, having received planning consent from the Scottish government energy consents unit earlier in January.

    Several other projects have laid claim to Europe’s biggest BESS in recent years, including most recently a 360MW Sembcorp Energy UK BESS, which is to be built in Teeside.


    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Three Givenergy 8.2 kWh batts & 3.0 kW ac inverter. Still waiting for V2H. CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Swan_ValleySwan_Valley Forumite
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    While it doesn't match California's scale of Battery Storage it is still the largest to be proposed in Europe and great that it's in the UK.
    Ok, Scotland actually. But I guess with surplus's already happening and more wind farms planned then it's likely to be in quite some demand by '24!

    Amp Energy gets go ahead for 800MW of battery storage

    Amp Energy is to build what it is claiming are Europe’s two largest grid-connected battery storage facilities, each boasting capacities of 400MW / 800MWh.

    Dubbed the Scottish Green Battery Complex, the facilities are to be locatedd in Hunterston and Kincardine in central Scotland.

    The two are set to be operational in April 2024, having received planning consent from the Scottish government energy consents unit earlier in January.

    Several other projects have laid claim to Europe’s biggest BESS in recent years, including most recently a 360MW Sembcorp Energy UK BESS, which is to be built in Teeside.


    Another report here:

    South Wales. SolarEdge 4kWp West + 6kWp East plus 2xGivEnergy 8.2kWh Batteries. 2xA2A ASHP's + MVHR.                                     Kia e-Soul 1st Edition & Renault Zoe Iconic BEV's. Go Faster & Ripple WT1 + Abundance.
  • edited 27 January at 11:00AM
    Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    edited 27 January at 11:00AM
    Just looked at Energy Numbers and there's quite a lot of wind gen at the moment (15.6GW at time of writing). I also noticed that we are exporting 1.5GW to France, but importing 2.8GW from Norway, Belgium and Netherlands, so we may be acting as an additional supply route from them to France(?)

    Be good to see how RE stacks up in the UK for 2022. With 2021 being a poor wind year, we should see a double bump this year if wind is average, from the new deployments in 2021/22. Could mean, dare I say should mean, that RE will exceed FF generation ....... well, one can hope.


    [I can see myself getting fascinated with all the movements via the interconnectors as their numbers rise to ~14 by the end of 2025.]

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • edited 27 January at 1:03PM
    2nd_time_buyer2nd_time_buyer Forumite
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    edited 27 January at 1:03PM
    Just looked at Energy Numbers and there's quite a lot of wind gen at the moment (15.6GW at time of writing). I also noticed that we are exporting 1.5GW to France, but importing 2.8GW from Norway, Belgium and Netherlands, so we may be acting as an additional supply route from them to France(?)

    Be good to see how RE stacks up in the UK for 2022. With 2021 being a poor wind year, we should see a double bump this year if wind is average, from the new deployments in 2021/22. Could mean, dare I say should mean, that RE will exceed FF generation ....... well, one can hope.


    [I can see myself getting fascinated with all the movements via the interconnectors as their numbers rise to ~14 by the end of 2025.]

    I saw that at one point this morning, the generation was 17.8 kWh from wind. I believe that is a (slight) new record for UK wind.

    https://www.energylivenews.com/2021/05/05/uk-wind-power-breaks-new-record-on-bank-holiday/#:~:text=British wind farms broke a,GW set on 13th February.
  • CoastalwatchCoastalwatch Forumite
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    Hooray, Wales is getting in on the tidal 'wave' too.

    Nova and Sabella secure 12MW Welsh tidal site

    Tidal energy players Sabella and Nova Innovation have secured a 12MW berth off the coast of north Wales, at one of the world’s largest tidal energy sites.

    Morlais is the first project win for Sabella and Nova after they announced in June 2021 that they will be working together on tidal energy site development.

    Each company will develop 6MW in the 12MW berth, located off Holy Island, Anglesey, which covers an area of 650 sq m.

    Sabella and Nova Innovation have already started surveys at Morlais and they are looking to install their first turbines in 2023/24.

    That's great news Mart. Can't wait to see them in place generating, then scaling up as wind has in the last decade or two.
    Impressive as the figures are and a  pleasing step forward 12MW is but the output of one of the latest Wind Turbines. I wonder what energy price has been agreed/discussed?

    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Three Givenergy 8.2 kWh batts & 3.0 kW ac inverter. Still waiting for V2H. CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    I appreciate that 'Blue' Hydrogen, produced from FF methane with CCS has not been well received on here, and personally I see a lot of the push for a hydrogen economy coming from the FF industry rather than a more sensible approach with excess RE and electrolysers, but even this news surprised me.

    So, take the FF methane, produce hydrogen, capture some of the CO2 and bury it, and what do you get when you add it all up including fugitive emissions, you get more CO2(e) released than just burning the FF gas. Well ain't that just great.

    [Note - Some of the comments suggest that this facility is a test facility, and not designed to maximise CO2 capture, so improvements should be possible. But the counter argument seems to be that FF's can no longer compete economically against RE, so adding on additional costs and complexities for CCS, that still won't make it 'carbon free' appears to fail all metrics going forward. M.]

    Global Witness Exposes The Lie Behind The Carbon Capture Scam

    Hydrogen is often viewed as an important energy carrier in a future decarbonized world. Currently, most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming of methane in natural gas (“gray hydrogen”), with high carbon dioxide emissions. Increasingly, many propose using carbon capture and storage to reduce these emissions, producing so-called ‘blue hydrogen,’ frequently promoted as low emissions.

    “We undertake the first effort in a peer-reviewed paper to examine the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of blue hydrogen accounting for emissions of both carbon dioxide and unburned fugitive methane. Far from being low carbon, greenhouse gas emissions from the production of blue hydrogen are quite high, particularly due to the release of fugitive methane.

    “Perhaps surprisingly, the greenhouse gas footprint of blue hydrogen is more than 20% greater than burning natural gas or coal for heat and some 60% greater than burning diesel oil for heat, again with our default assumptions. In a sensitivity analysis in which the methane emission rate from natural gas is reduced to a low value of 1.54%, greenhouse gas emissions from blue hydrogen are still greater than from simply burning natural gas, and are only 18%-25% less than for gray hydrogen.

    “Our analysis assumes that captured carbon dioxide can be stored indefinitely, an optimistic and unproven assumption. Even if true though, the use of blue hydrogen appears difficult to justify on climate grounds.”

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    Article looking at the savings from negawatts - reduced energy consumption from greater efficiency devices and of course insulation, insulation, insulation. Savings sound high, but I suppose helping with very poor quality housing over the years, and large properties does make a huge difference, and loft insulation alone must be a big win.

    Later on the article looks to the savings that RE generation has brought v's greater reliance on expensive gas at the moment.

    I appreciate it's a massive oversimplification, but everything seems to keep pointing at insulation, efficiency and cheaper renewables. It's not exactly rocket surgery, we have all the necessary solutions today, just a need to push forward. Longer term solutions such as larger scale storage appear to be developing well too for when their time comes.


    Green energy measures saving households £1,000 a year – analysis

    Energy efficiency measures have already saved the average British household about £1,000 a year in energy bills, and further insulation and home improvements could halve future bills, analysis has shown.

    But the future savings are unlikely to be realised unless the government focuses swiftly on insulation, as the savings to date have come largely from efficiency improvements in electrical appliances and boilers, which will not be repeated.
    “Gas boilers are now about as efficient as they can be. The big area for improvement is insulation,” said Rosenow. “You can’t get to net zero without insulation. It’s impossible, it would be far too expensive and impractical.”

    Some Conservative MPs and rightwing commentators have argued that the net zero target should be reconsidered in light of the energy crisis, and have called for more oil and gas exploration. However, analysts have shown that renewable power has reduced the cost of electricity generation, and that overreliance on gas is the leading cause of high prices.

    “Green” Tories have also stepped up their defence of the net zero targets in recent days. Alok Sharma, president of the Cop26 climate summit, in a speech to the Chatham House thinktank said: “Clean is competitive, and the global race to supply the technologies and solutions a net zero world needs is on. The train is pulling out of the station and countries and companies that want to remain competitive need to leap on now.”

    Grant Shapps, the transport secretary, told the Bright Blue thinktank: “People who are sceptical about net zero worry that it’s going to add to the cost of energy bills … [But] this is all about taking a lead, jobs and exports. We can steal a march on the world by learning how to decarbonise. For decarbonisation, we want to be the pilots, not the passengers.”

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
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