Green, ethical, energy issues in the news

edited 12 July 2021 at 10:38AM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
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  • CoastalwatchCoastalwatch Forumite
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    That's some storage facility planned and being beyond what battery systems currently deliver will surely be a welcome addition to the storage aspect. They promote it's emission free and non toxic materials together with rotational inertia as supporting the move to a clean future for the grid, but I can find no figures for round trip efficiency other than saying it has increased efficiency over traditional CAES systems! 

    Hydrostor plans 400 MW / 3200 MWh compressed air energy storage

    The plant would be able to deliver 400 MW of electricity for 8 hours, and would be comparable in size to some of California’s largest fossil fuel power plants.
    The company said its technology has a 50 + year system life, uses no toxic materials, is emissions-free, and can provide rotational inertia in support of grid stability.

    The plant, named the Pecho Energy Storage Center, will be able to deliver 400 megawatts of electricity for 8 hours, and will be comparable in physical size to some of California’s largest fossil fuel power plants. It is planned to interconnect at an existing 230 kV PG&E Morro Bay Switching Station, strategically located to serve California’s central coast.

    The Pecho Energy Storage Center is expected to create 30 to 40 permanent, full-time jobs, and 200 to 450 labor jobs during construction.



    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    Crazy in the title, and this idea does look a bit far fetched, especially with WT's shading a PV array, but I have to admit I love the idea of PV, wind and wave power all co-located. I just hope it's possible.


    Crazy Floating All-In-One Renewable Energy Gizmo Has Everybody Suddenly Talking

    When the German company SINN Power first introduced its floating hybrid renewable energy platform last year, the news caused barely a ripple. Now suddenly everyone is talking about the company’s so-named Ocean Hybrid Platform, including us. We’re calling it the Swiss Army Knife of clean power because it combines wind, solar, and wave energy all in one delicate-looking package. However, looks can be deceiving, and perhaps this spring chicken is no shrinking violet after all.
    However, as SINN points out, the technology used on freshwater bodies does not require hardening against waves and other stormy conditions typical of ocean environments or, for that matter, large lakes.

    “As the possibility of extreme weather events rises, these systems are in danger of failing. Depending on the extent of damage, consequences will range from loss of revenue up to a complete loss of investment. Therefore, current freshwater solutions face restrictions in deployments at sea, partly even in protected coastal areas and big lakes,” SINN emphasizes.

    The solution SINN offers is a flexible design that can accommodate wave heights of up to 12 meters and winds speeds of 27 meters per second. SINN also claims that the skeleton of the structure can take on wind speeds of up to 60 meters per second.

    That’s not exactly hurricane strength, but it does open up the potential to plumb offshore waters in bays and other sheltered areas for renewable energy. It’s also possible that SINN’s offshore platform could be shuttered or towed to safety when extreme weather threatens, considering that it provides for small and medium-sized deployment as well as large-scale arrays.

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    Time for a Carbon Commentary Newsletter from Chris Goodall

    Things I noticed and thought were interesting

    Week ending 28th November 2021
     
    1, Replacing oil with hydrogen. Oman produces about 1 million barrels a day, or 1% of world production. Reports say that it will target 30 GW of hydrogen production capacity by 2040, reaching 10 GW by 2030. If these electrolysers worked at 100% capacity, they would produce hydrogen with an energy value approximately half of its current oil production. In other words, the plan is for a proper transition to a lower carbon economy. The amount of hydrogen produced could provide for over 2% of likely world demand in 2040. Oman’s resources of wind and sun make these objectives ambitious but attainable. Recent announcements of several major hydrogen projects, particularly for green ammonia, suggest that Oman is serious about its intentions.
     
    2, E-methanol. The Swedish government put €15m behind a factory to make methanol from green hydrogen and CO2 captured from a combined heat and power plant. The plant will be operational in 2024, according to the developers Liquid Wind. One likely customer for the 50,000 tonnes a year will be Maersk, whose first large methanol-capable vessel will arrive also in 2023/2024. One ship would use about as much fuel as the annual output from the Liquid Wind plant. Maersk recently said it was talking to about 40 potential suppliers of zero carbon methanol and suggested it was the preferred fuel for its fleet.
     
    3, Hydrogen in distilleries. A consortium said it would largely decarbonise the industrial processes of a large Scotch whisky distillery owned by RemyCointreau. One of the first hydrogen boilers in Europe will provide the heat the plant needs. The equipment provider, Hydrogen Technologies, produced cost estimates which suggest that at today’s European natural gas prices (which probably won’t persist beyond spring 2022, of course) green hydrogen would be the cheapest power source, assuming wind electricity being available at less than 7 or 8 US cents a kWh. (See page 7). One interesting feature of the technology is that it is entirely closed loop. Electrolysis results in oxygen and hydrogen which are then burnt in the boiler and return to water. 

    4, Utilities committing to exit fossil fuels. ENEL is probably the world’s largest utility. It committed to abandoning generation using coal by 2027, and gas by 2040. It has about 40 GW of gas and coal capacity around the world today, able to generate almost two per cent of world electricity. The new target represents another tightening of its plans; previously it had suggested a 2030 for exit from coal. It said it would invest €210bn in renewables and grid improvements by 2030, more than doubling its low carbon capacity and taking it to 129 GW. The cost of the new plan dwarfs the current capital expenditure of around €10bn a year and means investments will have to run at around a third of annual revenue. Even for a utility of this size, the ambitions are impressive.
     
    5, Clothing. Circular economy specialist the Ellen Macarthur Foundation wrote about the impact of increasing what it calls the four ‘Rs’ – rental, resale, repair and remaking. It calculated that the ‘Rs’ represent about 3.5% of total clothing spending now and predicted that this figure could rise to 23% by 2030. This would reduce clothing’s greenhouse gas burden by 16%, providing almost one third of the reduction necessary to get to the industry’s target of a 50% by the end of the decade. The Foundation also commented that clothing production doubled between 2000 and 2015, while the average number of times an item was worn before disposal fell by 36%. The four ‘Rs’ will not be enough to meet climate objectives; a reduction in new purchases will also be necessary.
     
    6, Fertilizer producers as source of ammonia. Much of the world’s hydrogen production will be shipped as ammonia. This represents a major opportunity for the world’s fertiliser manufacturers, who are accustomed to dealing with safety issues and with the storage and transportation of this chemical. It may double or triple their available global market. Netherlands-based OCI, a fertiliser company, announced a joint venture with the Abu Dhabi state oil company to develop a green ammonia plant in Egypt using renewable electricity from new sites operated by Norway’s Scatec. The proposed plant is not huge – only 90,000 tonnes a year - but is an important early step towards developing a global supply chain for ammonia as a storage medium for hydrogen.
     
    7, Liquefaction of hydrogen.  One of the reasons why hydrogen will be transported over long distances in the form of ammonia, rather than as liquid, is the cost of liquefaction. The US government estimated that a plant to liquefy 70,000 tonnes a year would cost about $800m. (For comparison, the hydrogen used as an input to this facility might only be valued at about $100m annually if the gas reaches its target price of $1.50 a kilogramme). In addition, the energy used for chilling the H2 will be around one third of the energy value of the gas when used. These disadvantages are slowing the growth of liquefaction infrastructure. Nevertheless, US fuel cell and electrolyser leader Plug Power (the proposed source of the electrolysers for the joint venture in note 6) re-emphasised its intention to develop full liquid hydrogen networks across the US and Europe for transport and materials handling. It completed the purchase of a Texas business that specialised in products for transporting liquid gases. However my guess is the costs of liquefaction are so great that hydrogen pipeline networks will eventually dominate, even over long distance routes in North America. (Thanks to Mike Mason).
     
    8, Hydrogen for steel melting. Some steel is substantially processed after manufacture. It has to be melted for these processes to be carried out. Norwegian manufacturer NEL said it had sold what I think is the first electrolyser intended for use to produce hydrogen to heat cold steel. The 20 MW unit will operate at site in Sweden. Also noteworthy is the contract value of €11m, suggesting a price per kilowatt of €550, significantly lower than most current estimates of the price of alkaline electrolysers. The UK government, for example, estimates a current price of nearly €1000. (page 18)
     
    9, Perovskites. A wave of announcements from scientists around the world promising advances in perovskites, which are likely to provide a cheaper material for photovoltaics than silicon. Researchers at Rice University in the US said that they had developed an extremely thin layer of perovskite that is both durable and offers reasonable energy conversion, a combination that has evaded scientists in the past. Cambridge scientists examined perovskite structures in microscopic detail and advanced understanding of why the molecules behave as they do, raising hopes of further improvements in efficiency. Oxford PV's plant in Bradenburg, eastern Germany, should start production of combined silicon and perovskite panels in the next few weeks. This will be the first commercial scale output.

    10, South Australia reaches (nearly) 100% renewables. RenewEconomy reported that the renewable generators in the Australian state had reached up to 135% of total demand, a new world record. The news site also noted an important development on the grid with the extensive use of new forms of  ‘artificial inertia’, a way of coping with variations in renewables output. The consequence is that the grid was able to use less gas-fired generation than would previously have been the case. This advance needs to be copied by other renewables-based grids around the world which are forced to throttle renewables when output approaches 100% of total demand while keeping large amounts of gas generation capacity still operating.  

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    Renewables are still growing fast, but not fast enough to deal with the climate crisis.

    Please note that this article refers to the capacity rollout of new RE, not the percentage of energy from new RE.

    Renewable energy has ‘another record year of growth’ says IEA

    It has been another record year for renewable energy, despite the Covid-19 pandemic and rising costs for raw materials around the world, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

    About 290GW of new renewable energy generation capacity, mostly in the form of wind turbines and solar panels, has been installed around the world this year, beating the previous record last year. On current trends, renewable energy generating capacity will exceed that of fossil fuels and nuclear energy combined by 2026.

    New climate and energy policies in many countries around the world have driven the growth, with many governments setting out higher ambitions on cutting greenhouse gas emissions before and at the Cop26 UN climate summit in Glasgow last month.

    However, this level of growth is still only about half that required to meet net zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

    Fatih Birol, executive director of the IEA, said: “This year’s record renewable energy additions are yet another sign that a new global energy economy is emerging. The high commodity and energy prices we are seeing today pose new challenges for the renewable industry, but elevated fossil fuel prices also make renewables even more competitive.”

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    This article looks at how the 'anti' movement has shifted their attack now that science denial no longer works for the vast majority of rational people. Bear in mind that the 'anti' argument has really just been a way for the FF industry to slow down action to deal with the climate crisis, and the transition to renewable generation where wind and PV don't need to buy the fuel. Similarly a move to BEV's, combined with an ever greater percentage of low carbon leccy generation, is a 'one-two punch' for the FF industry.

    Anti-EV & Anti-Renewable FUD Keeps Evolving

    Fossil fuel companies have known about the risks of climate change since the 1970s. For several decades, they did everything they could to convince the public and policymakers that it wasn’t real, spending vast sums on advertisements, planted articles in the press, and studies by sympathetic “think tanks,” many of which were (and are) cited by politicians to justify inaction.

    These days, outright climate change denial doesn’t get much traction with educated people, so the defenders of the status quo have shifted their strategies. The oil companies and their allies (which include many automakers, utilities, conservative political parties and oil-exporting nations) now seek to present themselves as the good guys. Not only do they believe in climate change, but they’re at the forefront of efforts to fight it. In fact, it turns out that we can fix our environment while continuing to burn ever-increasing amounts of fossil fuels! (/s)

    Isn’t that great? Our grandchildren can still have the butterflies and polar bears, and oil companies can still rake in billions in profit. Everybody wins! But alongside this counterfeit carrot, there’s a sinister stick — radical commie-types and well-meaning but misinformed greenies are pushing pie-in-the-sky solutions like electric vehicles and renewable energy that won’t be viable for decades, if ever, and that will bankrupt taxpayers. As if that wasn’t bad enough, they also want to take away our burgers and pickup trucks.

    As Stella Levantesi and Giulio Corsi write in DeSmog, climate denial has evolved into “a softer, more insidious type of misinformation, one that focuses on denying urgency and action, one that targets the solutions more than anything else. Key elements of this strategy include promoting confusion, doomist perspectives, conspiracy theories, and fabricating lies to convince the public that there is no real need for climate change policy.”

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • shinytopshinytop Forumite
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    This article looks at how the 'anti' movement has shifted their attack now that science denial no longer works for the vast majority of rational people. Bear in mind that the 'anti' argument has really just been a way for the FF industry to slow down action to deal with the climate crisis, and the transition to renewable generation where wind and PV don't need to buy the fuel. Similarly a move to BEV's, combined with an ever greater percentage of low carbon leccy generation, is a 'one-two punch' for the FF industry.

    Anti-EV & Anti-Renewable FUD Keeps Evolving

    Fossil fuel companies have known about the risks of climate change since the 1970s. For several decades, they did everything they could to convince the public and policymakers that it wasn’t real, spending vast sums on advertisements, planted articles in the press, and studies by sympathetic “think tanks,” many of which were (and are) cited by politicians to justify inaction.

    These days, outright climate change denial doesn’t get much traction with educated people, so the defenders of the status quo have shifted their strategies. The oil companies and their allies (which include many automakers, utilities, conservative political parties and oil-exporting nations) now seek to present themselves as the good guys. Not only do they believe in climate change, but they’re at the forefront of efforts to fight it. In fact, it turns out that we can fix our environment while continuing to burn ever-increasing amounts of fossil fuels! (/s)

    Isn’t that great? Our grandchildren can still have the butterflies and polar bears, and oil companies can still rake in billions in profit. Everybody wins! But alongside this counterfeit carrot, there’s a sinister stick — radical commie-types and well-meaning but misinformed greenies are pushing pie-in-the-sky solutions like electric vehicles and renewable energy that won’t be viable for decades, if ever, and that will bankrupt taxpayers. As if that wasn’t bad enough, they also want to take away our burgers and pickup trucks.

    As Stella Levantesi and Giulio Corsi write in DeSmog, climate denial has evolved into “a softer, more insidious type of misinformation, one that focuses on denying urgency and action, one that targets the solutions more than anything else. Key elements of this strategy include promoting confusion, doomist perspectives, conspiracy theories, and fabricating lies to convince the public that there is no real need for climate change policy.”

    It's a shame both sides can't be a bit more reasoned and constructive.  That article is worse than the Daily Mail. 
  • Exiled_TykeExiled_Tyke Forumite
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    shinytop said:
    This article looks at how the 'anti' movement has shifted their attack now that science denial no longer works for the vast majority of rational people. Bear in mind that the 'anti' argument has really just been a way for the FF industry to slow down action to deal with the climate crisis, and the transition to renewable generation where wind and PV don't need to buy the fuel. Similarly a move to BEV's, combined with an ever greater percentage of low carbon leccy generation, is a 'one-two punch' for the FF industry.

    Anti-EV & Anti-Renewable FUD Keeps Evolving

    Fossil fuel companies have known about the risks of climate change since the 1970s. For several decades, they did everything they could to convince the public and policymakers that it wasn’t real, spending vast sums on advertisements, planted articles in the press, and studies by sympathetic “think tanks,” many of which were (and are) cited by politicians to justify inaction.

    These days, outright climate change denial doesn’t get much traction with educated people, so the defenders of the status quo have shifted their strategies. The oil companies and their allies (which include many automakers, utilities, conservative political parties and oil-exporting nations) now seek to present themselves as the good guys. Not only do they believe in climate change, but they’re at the forefront of efforts to fight it. In fact, it turns out that we can fix our environment while continuing to burn ever-increasing amounts of fossil fuels! (/s)

    Isn’t that great? Our grandchildren can still have the butterflies and polar bears, and oil companies can still rake in billions in profit. Everybody wins! But alongside this counterfeit carrot, there’s a sinister stick — radical commie-types and well-meaning but misinformed greenies are pushing pie-in-the-sky solutions like electric vehicles and renewable energy that won’t be viable for decades, if ever, and that will bankrupt taxpayers. As if that wasn’t bad enough, they also want to take away our burgers and pickup trucks.

    As Stella Levantesi and Giulio Corsi write in DeSmog, climate denial has evolved into “a softer, more insidious type of misinformation, one that focuses on denying urgency and action, one that targets the solutions more than anything else. Key elements of this strategy include promoting confusion, doomist perspectives, conspiracy theories, and fabricating lies to convince the public that there is no real need for climate change policy.”

    It's a shame both sides can't be a bit more reasoned and constructive.  That article is worse than the Daily Mail. 
    I don't find anything unreasoned in this. It summarises a lot of the arguments we have heard in recent times, all of which we know to be bogus. And of course anything Fox news puts out we know to be utter lies (as this article points out). I remember watching a Fox news bulletin which set out to reassure viewers that Jesus was of course white! So sorry I can't agree that it's worse than the Mail.   The Mail is a pack of lies, Fox news is a pack of lies but I can't find much here that isn't merely pointing out the ridiculous narrative that multi-million dollar organisations are using to try to defend their huge wealth. 
    Install 28th Nov 15, 3.3kW, (11x300LG), SolarEdge, SW. W Yorks.
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  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
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    shinytop said:
    This article looks at how the 'anti' movement has shifted their attack now that science denial no longer works for the vast majority of rational people. Bear in mind that the 'anti' argument has really just been a way for the FF industry to slow down action to deal with the climate crisis, and the transition to renewable generation where wind and PV don't need to buy the fuel. Similarly a move to BEV's, combined with an ever greater percentage of low carbon leccy generation, is a 'one-two punch' for the FF industry.

    Anti-EV & Anti-Renewable FUD Keeps Evolving

    Fossil fuel companies have known about the risks of climate change since the 1970s. For several decades, they did everything they could to convince the public and policymakers that it wasn’t real, spending vast sums on advertisements, planted articles in the press, and studies by sympathetic “think tanks,” many of which were (and are) cited by politicians to justify inaction.

    These days, outright climate change denial doesn’t get much traction with educated people, so the defenders of the status quo have shifted their strategies. The oil companies and their allies (which include many automakers, utilities, conservative political parties and oil-exporting nations) now seek to present themselves as the good guys. Not only do they believe in climate change, but they’re at the forefront of efforts to fight it. In fact, it turns out that we can fix our environment while continuing to burn ever-increasing amounts of fossil fuels! (/s)

    Isn’t that great? Our grandchildren can still have the butterflies and polar bears, and oil companies can still rake in billions in profit. Everybody wins! But alongside this counterfeit carrot, there’s a sinister stick — radical commie-types and well-meaning but misinformed greenies are pushing pie-in-the-sky solutions like electric vehicles and renewable energy that won’t be viable for decades, if ever, and that will bankrupt taxpayers. As if that wasn’t bad enough, they also want to take away our burgers and pickup trucks.

    As Stella Levantesi and Giulio Corsi write in DeSmog, climate denial has evolved into “a softer, more insidious type of misinformation, one that focuses on denying urgency and action, one that targets the solutions more than anything else. Key elements of this strategy include promoting confusion, doomist perspectives, conspiracy theories, and fabricating lies to convince the public that there is no real need for climate change policy.”

    It's a shame both sides can't be a bit more reasoned and constructive.  That article is worse than the Daily Mail. 
    But there aren't two sides. There's reality, with all of the science confirming AGW. There's the science the FF industries carried out four decades ago, also confirming (very accurately in fact) AGW from FF emissions, that they then hid. But all of the science was in agreement.

    So there is only one side, the science/facts. The other 'side' is simply the FF industry that has done everything in its power for nearly half a century to mislead and misrepresent the truth about AGW, and now that they can no longer lie about the science, they choose to spread FUD about cleaner, greener and more ethical choices to slow down the necessary transition.

    I really don't understand why anyone would choose to be on, or believe in 'the other side'.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
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