Forum Home» Energy» Water Bills

Water meters - pros and cons? - Page 60

New Post Advanced Search

Water meters - pros and cons?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Water Bills
598 replies 365.3K views
1545556575860»

Replies

  • edited 20 May 2020 at 3:12PM
    notionalnotional Forumite
    34 posts
    Fifth Anniversary 10 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    edited 20 May 2020 at 3:12PM
    I live on my own in a one bed flat, which is the top half of a house. Thames Water is my supplier.
    I read that as a single person it's usually worth getting a meter, and if it's found to be not technically possible to fit one, you get put on a permanent discounted tariff.  This is absolutely true: it was not possible to fit a meter as the pipes are inaccessible (I had guessed this before the engineer visited).  My water bill got reduced from £23.45 to £21.77 a month.  :D
    I believe this is true for all suppliers, but do check.
  • CardewCardew Forumite
    28.5K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Rampant Recycler
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    notional said:
    I live on my own in a one bed flat, which is the top half of a house. Thames Water is my supplier.
    I read that as a single person it's usually worth getting a meter, and if it's found to be not technically possible to fit one, you get put on a permanent discounted tariff.  This is absolutely true: it was not possible to fit a meter as the pipes are inaccessible (I had guessed this before the engineer visited).  My water bill got reduced from £23.45 to £21.77 a month.  :D
    I believe this is true for all suppliers, but do check.
    If a customer applies for a water meter, and one cannot be fitted,  all customers regardless of number of occupants, must be offered an 'Assessed Charge'. Whilst a fixed charge, this is not a discounted charge, although it usually is considerably cheaper for single occupants.
    All water companies have differing methods to calculate the assessed charge. For instance Severn Trent use the type of property as the basis i.e. detached house, semi-detached, terraced or flat. The Assessed Charge for Thames Water is on the basis of number of bedrooms. In addition allcompanies offer a single person rate.



  • RobM99RobM99 Forumite
    652 posts
    500 Posts Fourth Anniversary Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭
    Probably already mentioned (I'm not trawling through 60 pages!) but water companies will have an on-line calculator. Dead simple to do.
  • RobM99RobM99 Forumite
    652 posts
    500 Posts Fourth Anniversary Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭
    Following on a friend (a lady I'm wooing - but without luck!) has done the above calculation and her water bill would go from £660 a year to £300.   May I say...


    Boom!
  • sheilavwsheilavw Forumite
    1.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    I pay just over £43 per month for 10 months for water. I was widowed in July 2019, my Daughters have left home so there is just me. I only have a wet room , I wash twice a week. Would I benefit from a meter? Is it free to change? thanks
  • harrym1bytharrym1byt Forumite
    51 posts
    Tenth Anniversary 10 Posts Combo Breaker
    sheilavw said:
    I pay just over £43 per month for 10 months for water. I was widowed in July 2019, my Daughters have left home so there is just me. I only have a wet room , I wash twice a week. Would I benefit from a meter? Is it free to change? thanks
    £430 per year. My annual bill five years ago was around £450 (Yorkshire Water), when my partner passed away and living alone. I did a bit of research which suggested I could cut my bill in half with a meter, so I gave it a go and sure enough it did and then some. I am no longer alone and paying a little more, £276 per year, but we use more water and prices have gone up and no doubt the £450 annual bill will have increased for unmetered. I take no special precautions to save water, I am just less frivolous with its use than I was.
    It used to be you could try one for a year, see how it worked out and reject the meter if it didn't work out for you, not sure if that is still true.
        
  • sheilavwsheilavw Forumite
    1.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    thanks harrym, I think that I will look into it. Im out at work too (term time)
  • TrojanxxxxTrojanxxxx Forumite
    3 posts
    Fourth Anniversary First Post
    MoneySaving Newbie
    I bought my father's 3 bedroom semi bungalow 11 years ago.The  bill was based on RV about £500 per year. 10 years on my bill is about £280 per year.
    One more note is make sure you read the meter regular.I travel a lot and was away 3 months but never turned the water off at the stop !!!!!!.off.
    My 6 monthly bill was £370 due to the leak even though I was not there.
    Positive thing if you check you will you know you have problems and find the leak and stop damage.Mine was under the floorboards don't easily seen reading the meter regularly would have alerted me as I know my average use.
    United Utilities  reduced my bill as it was a first time leak.
    If you live in your own and mid band RV I think it will be worth it,do the trial and see .

Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support