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Train Delays guide discussion

edited 28 July 2014 at 3:34PM in Public Transport & Cycling
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  • As this is "compensation", can I personally claim for a delay even if I am travelling on a ticket paid for by my employer?

    Last week I had to travel on business, a journey with two legs on an Anytime ticket. The first leg was fine, but the trains for the second leg kept getting cancelled. In the end I ended up catching a train an hour and a half after the one I intended to, and got there two hours later than I was due to arrive.

    Although I have a photo of the time I arrived (taken to send to my manager moaning about how long I'd been travelling!), the ticket got swallowed by the barrier on my way out of the station. Therefore I don't have proof of my journey, but I do have a booking reference. Obviously though, this booking reference will show it wasn't a personal booking. Will this make a difference if I submit a claim?
  • pollythena wrote: »
    As this is "compensation", can I personally claim for a delay even if I am travelling on a ticket paid for by my employer?

    Last week I had to travel on business, a journey with two legs on an Anytime ticket. The first leg was fine, but the trains for the second leg kept getting cancelled. In the end I ended up catching a train an hour and a half after the one I intended to, and got there two hours later than I was due to arrive.

    Although I have a photo of the time I arrived (taken to send to my manager moaning about how long I'd been travelling!), the ticket got swallowed by the barrier on my way out of the station. Therefore I don't have proof of my journey, but I do have a booking reference. Obviously though, this booking reference will show it wasn't a personal booking. Will this make a difference if I submit a claim?

    good question - i'd like to know the answer to this as well.
  • Since there was no response, possibly because no one's sure, I've submitted a claim and will update if it's successful or not. Also, Arriva Trains Wales now has a downloadable claim form on their website (as part of the Passenger Charter) so you don't have to call or pick one up in the station.
  • Voyager2002Voyager2002 Forumite
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    I had a delay on Eurostar on May 21st London-Paris. Arrival time was 18.53 in Paris and the train stopped on the platform at 19.54. I rang Customer Service and they said no refund as the 'sensor' they use outside the station said the delay was only 55 minutes. The point is it was not possible to get off the train at the sensor, and the real delay was just over the hour, which should trigger compensation. What is the point of having a sensor to record delays if it bears no relation to the ACTUAL delay. The ticket says 18.53 arrival - it should be arrival time that is relevant.

    Perhaps your mistake was attempting to do this by telephone. Submit a claim form giving the time of arrival at the platform... if you noticed a wait outside the station then mention this, since that could explain the discrepancy between your record of arrival and their information as to when the train passed the sensor.
  • Voyager2002Voyager2002 Forumite
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    Johnjdc wrote: »
    Hi (old poster, hopefully temporary new account, password issues!)

    I am in a state of confusion. Guide is great, but it doesn't seem to solve my problem. I was delayed for exactly an hour on a long journey last week. The main part of the journey was on a Virgin train, but the delay was on a connecting Northern Rail service.

    The Northern Rail site tells me I have to claim from the company who sold me the ticket (I have no idea which company that was, it was the machine in the station - may have been a Virgin branded one but I can't say for sure). The Virgin site tells me I should claim from the company on whose train I experienced the delay.

    Which is it?!

    The machine would have belonged to whichever company operates the station: it is fairly easy to find out from the National Rail website which companies run which stations.
  • I have a question relating to all of the above. Making a claim to the rail operator is one thing but as my journey was delayed by 1hr and 30 minutes it meant I was too late for a flight! my subsequent charge for the next flight was £70 and that was 4 hrs later. Would you agree or disagree that I should be compensated for this extra charge. If so what about additional fee's like food charges whilst being stranded for 4 hrs based solely as a result of the train not running? Or am I just asking too much and should just go for my rail fare back?
  • Caz3121Caz3121 Forumite
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    missing a flight would be a consequential loss, and similar to a delayed flight meaning you miss a train and need to buy a new ticket, you should check your travel insurance to see if they cover. It may depend whether they deem that you have allowed sufficient time for the travel....I am guessing that without the delay you would have got to the airport 2 hours before the flight....your travel insurance may not consider that enough contingency allowed
  • Hi all. I have a question about refunds via an Oyster card.

    I live in zone 4 and commute to work in Victoria via Clapham Junction on South West Trains before changing onto Southern. However, my zone 1-4 travel card is a TFL travel card bought at Victoria Underground station which is loaded onto my Oyster card.

    According to South West Trains:

    We will not compensate you:

    If you purchased a Travelcard (either a 'paper' ticket or Oyster card) from a non-South West Trains outlet. We will consider your claim if you have proof that you use our services for all, or part, of your journey (e.g. a home or work address close to a station we serve, and details of the journey you make).

    Sorry, cant post link to this as new.

    So can I claim or not? It says they won't but then implies they'll consider it if i can prove my journeys use them. Fortunately I get an oyster statement every month detailing my journeys so this isnt difficult to do.

    Anyone had experience of this?
  • DonnySaverDonnySaver Forumite
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    I was delayed the other week by 63 mins on a First Hull Trains journey from London to Doncaster. I therefore filled in a compensation claim form and sent it off. I was entitled to a 100% ticket refund as my train was 60+ mins late.

    However, I have received a letter from First Hull Trains this morning saying that my train was only 59 mins late (how convenient) and therefore they will only pay my 50% of my fare back.

    I was travelling with 5 other people on this journey and the first thing we all did when our train stopped at Doncaster station was to look at our watches and the clock on the platform. We all said we were 63 mins late.

    It appears that First Hull Trains are not being totally honest with their arrival time in order to get out of paying money. Does anyone have any advice as to how I can prove our train was 63 mins late?
  • Try this perhaps?

    recenttraintimes(dot)co(dot)uk

    If you do the search, and then when the result window comes up click "Display more actual times" you can pan back through the records until you reach your train you took.

    Hopefully you can find the exact arrive time and compare to the advertised time. Look for the Bold Red number with an L after it.

    Let us all know if you or First Hull Trains are correct.
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