'Shame on Nationwide – no, I won't give you my security details' blog discussion

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  • Skie_2
    Skie_2 Posts: 20 Forumite
    I've had a call from Natwest that was similar. I moved a large amount from a savings account with them to my current account as I was about to buy a car and needed to be able to pay with my card. Within a few hours my local branch called and did the "this is x from Natwest, to confirm who you are please tell me lots of details you dont want in the wrong hands". In the end they just wanted to sell me a savings account for all of the money I now had in my current account.

    But it isnt just banks who do this, Virgin Media will often call and ask for your account password completely out of the blue. Even worse it's usually their Indian call centres doing this which, given the current batch of overseas scams with people claiming to be Microsoft employees, makes the practice even more dodgy.

    I'm sure the banks would hang you out to dry if you did get duped by a call like this.
  • squack
    squack Posts: 633 Forumite
    yes i had a similar call one evening last week from a company I hold a credit card with.

    The english-sounding guy immediately asked for some security details and was very patronising about my doubts to his authenticity when I told him that he could have nicked my details from an old statement at the recycling centre, or something

    He gave me his extension number to call back if I wanted to verify his credentials (I had no wish or reason to)

    Poor bloke was most likely completely legit but as a point of principle I was treating him as a total scammer in the call, he was pretty calm and collected until I made the comment that he "didn't even sound like his name was really xxxxx" when he lost it and was giving it, oh yeah, what do I sound like my name should be then?

    I like to turn these irritating sales calls into a reverse prank call where the call centre operative goes home and seriously considers whether ringing people in their own homes and trying to sell, or not sell, them something is a decent way of making a living

    A woman rang the other day about "the endowment policy" which I, as a victim of the unwanted sales call, assume is insurance for being well endowed i.e. covering accidents like it being slammed in a train door etc, to much mirth and sometimes embarrassment, at the end of the day THEY have rung ME, if everyone replied to these calls in such an idiotic manner their irritating and intrusive industry would be dead and I for one would be glad to see these parasites joining the shrinking dole queues
    squaaaaaaaaacccckkkkkk!!!! :money:
  • jamesd
    jamesd Posts: 26,103 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
    Skie wrote: »
    I'm sure the banks would hang you out to dry if you did get duped by a call like this.
    They would probably try and then, if they used the same approach in their own calls to you, fail when the matter reached the FOS. If a bank is training you to give out security information to unknown callers, they can't then rely on you protecting that information from an unknown caller.
  • I got one of these calls and refused to supply details - and it turned out to be to do with something that I'd already been into the branch and spoken to them about and resolved anyway. Much against my principles I rang them back (at my cost) to find out what they were playing at, realised it had happened because one part of Nationwide doesn't speak to the other part. I also made a strong bid that they should set up a reverse password, as it's a bit much to ring customers up and then chastise them for not supplying confidential info. I was eventually passed to their formal complaints team, and got my points recorded (for all the good that will do) and a £10 credit to my account as an acknowledgement that I'd had to spend time and money resolving a problem they'd caused. It was offered - I didn't ask for it, but obviously I accepted!:D
    Reason for edit? Can spell, can't type!
  • olly300
    olly300 Posts: 14,736 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    I was working abroad and paying for my accommodation by Nationwide credit card.

    As Nationwide would stop the payment I would phone them up to get them to authorise the transaction after it didn't go through.

    On two occasions I received automated messages to my UK mobile telling me to call Nationwide after I had already phoned them and got the transaction authorised.

    On one occasion this happened for 3 days continuously after the transaction had been authorised, until I called them again to ask them what the issue was. Apparently the person who had dealt with my call had not entered the right information into their system to stop these calls happening.

    Luckily for me I had brought top-up packages so receiving these calls was included.

    However I prefer Nationwide's automated calls compared to Barclaycards complete lack of response when they think a transaction is fraudulent.

    I've ordered printers etc on my Barclaycard and instead of notifying me that they won't allow the transaction they do absolutely nothing. So I have to wait for the retailer to contact me to inform me that they can't dispatch the item which can take 72 hours. Oddly I no longer use my Barclaycard for these type of transactions.
    I'm not cynical I'm realistic :p

    (If a link I give opens pop ups I won't know I don't use windows)
  • What would be best, in my opinion, is if all the banks had a clear "Call back" number on their website, back of cards and top of statements. If you receive a call from them the automated call just says "This is a call for X from XXXX bank. Please call us back on the call back number on your statement/card and enter the numbers YWXZA. This is not a marketing call. [End call]".

    When you call the "call back number" and enter the 4 or 5 digits (which could, in the basic sense, just be an extension for the fraud department of credit cards or the extension for complaints department: "best sense" would be a code - which combined with your DOB - is unique to this issue), it then prompts to pass identification (DOB etc) before routing you to the appropriate person.
  • I had First Direct call me once although it was quite a while ago. It was about a product I was interested in, we discussed it, I wanted it, and then she asked me to go through security questions and I said no.

    "Why not?"

    "because you phoned me, and I don't know that you are who you say you are. I'll call you back."

    She seemed quite taken aback by this.

    I once had a call from Sky who asked me for my password, and I said "is it Jones?" - my Mother's maiden name*. The agent replied, "No its 'Einstein'"* Gobsmacked!

    * Jones and Einstein aren't really my mother's maiden name and my password.
  • kazd wrote: »
    The reality is that each department uses a different computer system
    Tell me about it - I had to change my address details once on my NBS accounts, went into the branch, current account details changed, and it took several requests to get the mortgage department to change it because they (wait for it) used a different system.
  • I recently had a call. No names, let's just say it was 1st D*rect. They tried to get me to answer some security questions. In common with most people on this board I refused, pointing out that I could not be certain that it was a bank, and not an identity thief, calling. So the lady offered to tell me some of my own private information (eg date of birth, 2nd letter of password) in order to convince me! So she is quite happy to give my private and security details to someone whom she thinks might be a complete stranger. And they wonder why we are sick of banks.


    TOPS
  • pooch
    pooch Posts: 828 Forumite
    I recently had a call. No names, let's just say it was 1st D*rect. They tried to get me to answer some security questions. In common with most people on this board I refused, pointing out that I could not be certain that it was a bank, and not an identity thief, calling. So the lady offered to tell me some of my own private information (eg date of birth, 2nd letter of password) in order to convince me! So she is quite happy to give my private and security details to someone whom she thinks might be a complete stranger. And they wonder why we are sick of banks.


    TOPS
    They should be pretty sure who you are as they are calling you on the number you gave them.

    They just need to ensure it really is you, and not a relative etc.
    After they have given you sufficient confidence they really are the person they claim, they will probably go through some different security details to double check you really are the pesron they wish to speak with.
    I can't see any issues with that. :)
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