Spill the beans... on cheap, nutritious back to school lunchboxes

1468910

Comments

  • Fire_Fox
    Fire_Fox Posts: 26,026 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker
    jellyhead wrote: »
    Thanks, he already eats blueberries until they come out of his ears :) We've got 3 bushes in the garden. He has an egg most mornings too, and I can definitely see a difference on the days where he has cereal (with lactose free milk) because the cereal doesn't fill him up for long and he asks for food again.

    He would happily wrap his egg in ham, I'll try that :)

    Oooh fresh blueberries! :cool:

    Fill him up for longer with protein, fat and fibre (nuts, seeds, eggs, soft cheese, whey powder), milk is healthy but it's fairly low in protein and fat. Choose lower glycaemic index carbs (beans, barley, jumbo oats, tree fruits, berries) and limit higher glycaemic index ones (most wheat the flour is so finely ground, rice).
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
  • jasmin10
    jasmin10 Posts: 905 Forumite
    edited 1 September 2012 at 10:53PM
    Talking bout watching friends children. My dd loves salads etc as I put it out on the table when we eat. Even if she dosent eat it or say she doesnt want something the more we put it out(obviously
    she has a dinner I know she will eat). eventually after a few days of her seeing us eat something she will try it - that's all we ever say to her, just try it first to see.

    Anyhow, this friend we invited over for tea, 6yr old. I cooked a roast dinner , all from scratch and the roast spuds done in the actifry as always. She came to me and apologised as she didn't like the roast potatoes as they didn't taste like mummy's and she only liked those. I was really baffled, how else could a potato be??? Lucky we are v good friends so I told her that she left her roasties as mummys was better, she told me that they weren't mummy's they were aunt Bessie's. I was gob smacked that anyone would buy pre done - I did giggle tho
    TopCashback £1792.63
    My Little World
  • freyasmum
    freyasmum Posts: 20,597 Forumite
    Name Dropper Photogenic First Post First Anniversary
    I've given my daughter chicken legs, quiche, tuna/chicken/ham pasta but it mostly comes home uneaten - the packed lunch children are kept seperate from the SD kids and one little boy (the teachers son) keeps saying 'I hate it when you bring that box, it's always stinking' so she doesn't like taking that :wall: If I give her a big tub of salad (corn, leaves, carrots, peppers, cucumber, tomatoes, and big chunks of meat) the little sod will eat the veg and leave the meat :doh:

    She usually has sandwiches/rolls or, her favourite, wraps loaded with salad and chicken/cheese/ham.

    She'll take a tub of pepper and cucumber sticks, or grapes with cucumber or different chopped fruits, or apples, or cherries and berries, etc - it depends what mood she's in - and another little lock n lock tub of dried fruits (eats apricots like they're going out of fashion!) and different nuts - pecans, cashews, hazlenuts and pistachioes are her current favourites.

    She also has a frube which I'm well aware isn't as healthy as plain, unsweetened yogurt, but it's easier for her to eat and it's less messy in her box. It's also more kid friendly, imo.
    Fire_Fox wrote: »
    Oh dear your daughter is a fussy little thing, isn't she? Why are you bothering to read a thread on nutritious lunchboxes if you are going to be so rude about the suggestions? Has your daughter inherited your appalling manners as well as your finickiness?
    Why is not eating pilchards, or chicken liver pate being fussy? :o
  • Fire_Fox wrote: »
    Don't put more than ONE SMALL junk/ processed/ sugary/ fatty item in the lunchbox even if they are homemade. It is recommended that these comprise no more than 10% of daily calories which is a lot less than you might think, 150 to 200 calories per day depending on the age and appetite of the child.

    There are many different delicious dried fruits available now - my personal favourites are sour cherries, pears and sun dried (unsweetened) pineapple; nuts and seeds are packed with protein, minerals, fibre and healthy fats and go well with dried fruits. These can be made into flapjacks with jumbo oats, wheatgerm, creamed coconut instead of all butter, a little natural sugar substitutes such as xylitol or stevia.

    Please make sure they are allowed to take in nuts. One girl in my daughters school has a severe, life threatening allergy to nuts. She doesn't have to eat them just being close by is enough to send her in to shock.
  • Someone mentioned about chocolate not being too bad for you. I agree that cocoa is very good for you - a source of iron, antioxidants and other stuff but it's all the additives that make it bad - sugars, oils etc etc.
    I mentioned previously I make cocoa-beet muffins for my son which has a good amount of cooked beetroot in it so they're actually one of his 5-a-day! I use agave nectar which is lower GI than standard sugar and sweeter so you need less (I think it's fructose based). Soya milk which is fortified with calcium and B12, some flax seed oil which is a great source omega oils. Who said cakes can't be healthy.
  • Thanks for the lunch ideas Fire Fox. I'm well past the school dinner stage but I'll try and use your list as inspiration for my work lunches. I either skip lunch altogether, just snack on some fruit, or go out and get a supermarket/Boots sandwich that bores me to death now after 20-odd years of work lunches.

    I try and take stuff in sometimes and it's always so much nicer, I just need to get into the habit of planning for it, buying the stuff, and then making sure I act on those good intentions instead of food sitting in the fridge for 2 weeks then thrown away.

    I'm going shopping today - I'm going to make myself a lunch plan and list first for the week, and stick to it. Much more MSE!
    Cash not ash from January 2nd 2011: £2565.:j

    OU student: A103 , A215 , A316 all done. Currently A230 all leading to an English Literature degree.

    Any advice given is as an individual, not as a representative of my firm.
  • jellyhead
    jellyhead Posts: 21,555 Forumite
    Combo Breaker First Post
    freyasmum wrote: »
    one little boy (the teachers son) keeps saying 'I hate it when you bring that box, it's always stinking' so she doesn't like taking that :wall:

    If you complained he'd probably be told not to do it. My son was told off last year for complaining about the smell of people's lunchboxes (he really hates cheese). 1 parent complained to school, and when the teacher mentioned it 2 other children said he'd done it to them too.

    He'd tried to deal with it himself by moving away from the people who eat cheese every day, but he didn't do it subtly, he told his best friend that he was wasn't going to sit with her because her sandwiches smell :(

    Teacher's son might be a horrrid child, but he might have special needs that mean his nose is too sensitive and he truly hates certain smells. He still needs to be told to deal with it in a way that doesn't make others feel uncomfortable though.

    For some reason when I was pregnant I hated the smell of cheese, and even walking down the isle where they were enclosed in packets made me heave.
    52% tight
  • What do you do for the "liquid" part of the lunchbox? Am I supposed to buy a carton/bottle of squash for each day or can I just fill up a bottle with juice either made at home or decanted from a larger juice carton? It would be more economical this way, right?
    ..............................................................................
    NW: [STRIKE]£5014.49[/STRIKE]/£4000/£745
    BC: £4308/£2500
    Loan: Co-op: [STRIKE]£3777.23[/STRIKE] /
    [STRIKE]£3387.23[/STRIKE]
    £2900/PAID
    Challenge: debt-free by Christmas 2017
  • jellyhead
    jellyhead Posts: 21,555 Forumite
    Combo Breaker First Post
    Yes, just find a bottle that doesn't leak. That way you can dilute it to suit - my son has his squash much weaker than the squash bottle suggests, and they can have tap water.
    52% tight
  • Fire_Fox
    Fire_Fox Posts: 26,026 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post Combo Breaker
    Someone mentioned about chocolate not being too bad for you. I agree that cocoa is very good for you - a source of iron, antioxidants and other stuff but it's all the additives that make it bad - sugars, oils etc etc.
    I mentioned previously I make cocoa-beet muffins for my son which has a good amount of cooked beetroot in it so they're actually one of his 5-a-day! I use agave nectar which is lower GI than standard sugar and sweeter so you need less (I think it's fructose based). Soya milk which is fortified with calcium and B12, some flax seed oil which is a great source omega oils. Who said cakes can't be healthy.

    Welcome! :) Absolutely, as I said "Contrary to popular belief chocolate is not a 'naughty' food .... it's the sugars and vegetable fat in regular chocolate that are bad for you."

    Flaxseed should be eaten raw because heating damages the delicate short chain omega-3s, it is advised to bake with a more stable oil. Do be aware fructose or agave nectar still counts towards the maximum 10% daily calories from sugary/ fatty/ junk/ processed foods.
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
This discussion has been closed.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 343.2K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.1K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449.7K Spending & Discounts
  • 235.3K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 608K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.1K Life & Family
  • 247.9K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards