"Is it wrong to work at a cinema or be a binman?" blog discussion.

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  • dktreeseadktreesea Forumite
    5.7K Posts
    It's probably more financially worthwhile to work as a binman, which is usually not a minimum wage job than in a cinema on minimum wage. But either way, the wages of the two activities are not set high enough to inspire people to want to do them. It seems to me our economy is set up to give financial incentives to people who choose to stay out of the workforce (or at least restrict the hours they are willing to devote to working) and instead have children, the more the merrier.
  • jbreckmckyejbreckmckye Forumite
    241 Posts
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    smala01 wrote: »
    The trouble with society today is that every tom !!!!!! and harry expects the world but few are prepared to work for it.

    Great, but we don't even *let* people work. Even entry level jobs demand experience, and if you're 'overqualified', you're not even considered.

    Leaving university and being unemployed, I was more than happy at the prospect of working in a very junior job (it's money and it proves I can hold something down) - but the interviews just never came. No-one seemed to believe that I wanted the work in question. Thankfully, a 'Future Jobs Fund' placement gave me a leg up and put me in a position where I could break in to my chosen field, but before that was just six months of frustration.

    I suspect the real problem is that it's so hard to fire a bad employee, that businesses are just too cautious to give people a chance.
  • I have admiration for anybody who is doing a job because it is better than being unemployed!
  • EmmaHertsEmmaHerts Forumite
    313 Posts
    I did some pretty grotty jobs as a teenager/young adult, but I took the approach that it was good for me. Not just because I got money, but because I got to meet such a wide selection of people and learnt to communicate with just about anyone.

    I think doing the grotty jobs is what gave me the skills and confidence to go on to a fairly well-paid job.
  • SaturnaliaSaturnalia Forumite
    2.1K Posts
    Nothing at all wrong with doing either of those jobs, why would there be? I just don't get the attitude of some people.

    For me, emptying the bins or working on a till would be a job that is beneath my qualifications and beneath my work experience level, but I would not consider the job to be beneath me. It's work, it pays, and in the case of the binman earning £20k, that's better wages than in some London offices I've worked in.
    Public appearances now involve clothing. Sorry, it's part of my bail conditions.
  • PetlambPetlamb Forumite
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    While it's ridiculous to suugest this attitude is the ONLY reason for high youth unemployment (it isn't), I do think the blog makes a good point in the sense that it certainly isn't helping. Too many people are sitting around waiting for an opportunity that only comes once in a handful of peoples' lifetimes.
    On the up :D
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  • smala01 wrote: »
    There is nothing wrong with these jobs, just the person who does them should not expect to be able to buy a house, car and take 2 holidays a year.

    Those luxuaries come with hard work and sacrifice (moving away, education promotion at work etc)

    The trouble with society today is that every tom !!!!!! and harry expects the world but few are prepared to work for it.

    Smala01

    I have been a binman for 7 years now and have previously been a successful retail manager and an estate agent. I became a binman to better myself both financially and with my work/life balance. I'm not uneducated either I got good gcse results but had to go into paid work due to my parents divorcing and trying to keep a roof over my father and my heads. I also happen to enjoy hard manual work, it keeps me fit and saves on gym fees. As a binman/driver I earn £34,000 + per year, I live in a 12 year old 4 bed detached home, have a Westfield sportscar in the garage and my wife and I have newish cars on the drive. We also holiday up to 3 times a year including the Caribbean. I love the job, the only downside is people stereotyping me and treating me like something horrible I've stepped in and talking to me as if I'm thick ! Next time you see a binman or another manual worker just think first !
  • CKhalvashiCKhalvashi Forumite
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    It's like asking whether it's wrong to work in a cab office/as driver.

    I've done both, and got very rich in the process.

    CK
    "I kada sanjamo san, nek bude hiljadu raznih boja" (L. Stamenkovic)

    Please note: All posts on Coronavirus legislation refer to England unless specified otherwise.

    I can spell, my iPad can't.
  • YoungBusinessmanYoungBusinessman Forumite
    1.2K Posts
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    In 5 short, very quick years i have worked from £3.20 an hour at 16 to my now £52k+ a year....

    hourly rate works out at £36.40 gross for past 2 weeks. In 5 years time i hope to keep this rate of progression up. Time will tell. Its not wrong, it is wrong if you take nothing from it.
    :eek:Living frugally at 24 :beer:
    Increase net worth £30k in 2016 : http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?p=69797771#post69797771
  • smala01smala01 Forumite
    154 Posts
    Six_string wrote: »
    I have been a binman for 7 years now and have previously been a successful retail manager and an estate agent. I became a binman to better myself both financially and with my work/life balance. I'm not uneducated either I got good gcse results but had to go into paid work due to my parents divorcing and trying to keep a roof over my father and my heads. I also happen to enjoy hard manual work, it keeps me fit and saves on gym fees. As a binman/driver I earn £34,000 + per year, I live in a 12 year old 4 bed detached home, have a Westfield sportscar in the garage and my wife and I have newish cars on the drive. We also holiday up to 3 times a year including the Caribbean. I love the job, the only downside is people stereotyping me and treating me like something horrible I've stepped in and talking to me as if I'm thick ! Next time you see a binman or another manual worker just think first !

    Well i know where i would begin the cuts...
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