Heavy duty petrol grass trimmer

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
15 replies 6.6K views
4suzie4suzie Forumite
157 Posts
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
I am looking for a heavy duty petrol grass trimmer with a metal blade for my daughter,they have a big area of land which is totally over grown with very tall nettles and lots of weeds.

Thank you for any help.
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Replies

  • 4suzie wrote: »
    I am looking for a heavy duty petrol grass trimmer with a metal blade for my daughter,they have a big area of land which is totally over grown with very tall nettles and lots of weeds.

    Thank you for any help.

    what would you like to no ?
  • SalzSalz Forumite
    385 Posts
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    I am looking for £250000 to buy a house, go on holiday, etc. Thanks for your help. ;)
    Don't Panic - and carry a towel
  • 4suzie4suzie Forumite
    157 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 100 Posts Combo Breaker
    what would you like to no ?

    If you mean what would you like to know?

    It would be the name of a good heavy duty petrol grass trimmer with a metal blade.
    Salz wrote:
    I am looking for £250000 to buy a house, go on holiday, etc. Thanks for your help.

    Sorry can't help I am busy looking for grass trimmer :p
  • Hi Suzie, I have had a Spear and Jackson brush cutter for three years, its just packed in but worked hard and cut many acres of woody stems, nettles, thistles and docks. only cost £99, but I can't find another to replace it so have looked elsewhere.

    I saw a Stihl one the other day, shop wanted £350 but came down to £295 for cash, but then i found this one online, almost a third of the price, a three year warranty, and plenty good reviews......

    http://www.toolbaydirect.co.uk/catalogue/product/Strimmers--Brushcutters/258/Silverline-267969-43cc-Petrol-Engine-Brush-Cutter--Line-Trimmer-440mm---BullhornBike-Handles/208623/

    I'm having one of them, hopefully next week. Hope that helps :)

    Bucket.
  • We've used a Ryobi brush cutter for about 3 years now. Bought it off ebay and paid about 75 quid IIRC. It's had some real hammer and still works like new.
  • fworfwor Forumite
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    Bucket - a word of warning about Silverline. Everything I've ever bought by Silverline has been rubbish quality.

    I should add that I don't know anything specific about that brush cutter, but I bought a chop saw by them and it was just rubbish - all the adjusters had play in them and when fully tightened up it wobbled all over the place.

    A mate of mine works in a technical college and he won't touch anything by them other than hand tools - and only those because the students trash them every year (or sometimes every term), irrespective of make.
  • tired_dadtired_dad Forumite
    621 Posts
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    lots of land = get pro stuff.

    Stihl 2 stroke tools.
    Hayter or Honda mower
  • edited 30 June 2012 at 10:33PM
    ItismehonestItismehonest Forumite
    4.4K Posts
    edited 30 June 2012 at 10:33PM
    When you say big area, OP - how big?

    We use a petrol Husqvarna (& change trim head to brushcutter etc. as needed) but the size/model would depend on how much punishment you'd want to put it through.
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    I wouldn't go with anything cheap, but it's a bit hard to advise when one person's "big area of land" is another's puny 0.2 acre! There are wheeled brushcutters that cost upwards of £500 which would be appropriate to an acre or more and heavy duty hand-held models that will be fine with less than that.

    I've been using a 35cc Honda for the last 3 years on an area of about an 1.5 acres, plus clearing-up jobs elsewhere. The thing has been thoroughly thrashed and, until now, has taken it all without complaint. It's a four stroke so no piddling-about mixing oil & petrol, and starting is a breeze.

    However, I now have a problem with the Honda which I can't fix alone, so this leads me to suggest that your daughter looks at what 'proper' dealers are selling & servicing in her area, rather than buy from a DIY shed or on the Internet. Eventually, she will need one of these people.

    As an aside, I use a three year old Ryobi tending the graveyard. It's powerful enough, but its harness is rubbish, starting is hit & miss and the bent shaft is a nightmare. Get a straight shaft machine with a good harness. I find cow horn handlebars most comfortable, but that might be a personal thing.

    Oh, and your daughter won't always need a blade. 3mm line is often just as good, unless dealing with saplings.

    For more advice, Google the Landscape Juice web site, wehere the pros discuss these things. ;)
    People who don't stand for something will fall for anything.
  • peter_the_piperpeter_the_piper Forumite
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    Second Daves advice, Honda are good (we have one)but as with all small engined machines do not like being left with old petrol in over winter or long periods, it gums up the carburettor.
    I'd rather be an Optimist and be proved wrong than a Pessimist and be proved right.
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