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Changing the rateable values of Water bill

edited 25 March 2010 at 5:08PM in Water Bills
2 replies 2K views
falcon21falcon21 Forumite
61 posts
edited 25 March 2010 at 5:08PM in Water Bills
Hello all!

In November I moved into a single floor flat that had been created out of part of a two floor maisonette.

The landlord isn't the most organised person, with the result that we had to get the Council Tax rebanded - another story altogether!

However, I am now wondering whether we are overpaying our water. I checked with the water people and they have (quite bizarrely) still got us down as a same rateable value as before the split. Even more strangely the people upstairs (second floor of the maisonette - now another single floor flat) seem to be on the same rateable value, but as a separate account. The water utility company are effectively getting twice the money for effectively the same amount of coverage. However, the person I spoke to from the Water company was adamant that I couldn't change the rateable value.

Can anyone advise on a way I could get it changed?

Replies

  • AltarfAltarf Forumite
    2.9K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
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    They are correct, you can't get it changed.

    http://www.ofwat.gov.uk/aptrix/ofwat/publish.nsf/Content/info47

    Have you considered a water meter?
  • falcon21falcon21 Forumite
    61 posts
    For other people's information these are the relevant answers:

    "Can I appeal if I think my rateable value is too high?

    No. Rateable value assessments have not been made since 31 March 1990. Since that date there has been no appeal mechanism for existing rateable values."

    "What happens if my property has been structurally altered since its rateable value was assessed?

    You should contact your water company. If your property has changed in size or in use from domestic to commercial purposes or vice versa - it may mean that the rateable value is no longer valid. In some circumstances the company might insist that a meter is fitted or apply a new fixed charge"
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