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Please ensure your electrics are up to date!!!!!!!!! - Page 2

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Please ensure your electrics are up to date!!!!!!!!!

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  • bocksterbockster Forumite
    448 posts
    Ishtar wrote:
    Apparently you can get trip switches that plug into the fuse box, where your fuse carriers currently sit - can't remember how much they cost, but my dad has been nagging us to get them for a while (he's seen them in Focus DIY, and I'm sure they are probably available from Screwfix). Obviously the ideal situation is to get an RCD box, but this could be be a good interim measure.

    D.


    the 'trip switches' you mention are miniature circuit breakers whose function is to protect the cable on that circuit from overload, not to protect someone from shock.

    the device that is designed to protect people from shock has several names inc;- rcd - residual current device.
    rccb - residual current circuit breaker.
    elcb - earth leakage circuit breaker.
    there may be others! but all the same thing.
    it will have a 'test' button on it to help you identify it.

    please don't be confused into thinking you are protected from shock if you only have miniature circuit breakers!
    Please note, we've had to remove your signature because it was sh*te!
  • roger56roger56 Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    478 posts
    Here is an example of a RCD used as part of a consumer unit:
    http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/Consumer_Units_Index/MK_Sentry_RCDs/index.html

    You can also buy versions to replace sockets:
    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=23064&ts=79731

    And safety extension leads (recommended for garden equipment):
    http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=40107&ts=79615

    Do be aware of current rgulations about electrics:
    http://www.niceic.org.uk/partp/partphouse.html
  • benoodbenood Forumite
    1.4K posts
    We moved last year and our rewirable fuseboard had a great warning sign: "wired by dyslexic electrician", that encouraged us to have a proper modern board fitted straight away, and it wasn't very costly - about £300 from memory including a few other bits of work too - well worth it I think after reading this post.
  • Not long since finished having ours rewired - total rewire from top to bottom. We were in two minds whether to do that now or wait a couple of years until our forthcoming baby was old enough to cope with the mess. As it was they could do it fairly quickly so we did.

    I won't bore you with all the potentially dangerous things they found - all no doubt perfectly legal when installed, but the piece de resistance was the discovery that the socket I was happily using for the lawnmower was actually on the unearthed lighting circuit!
    Adventure before Dementia!
  • baldelectricianbaldelectrician Forumite
    2.5K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
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    All the stuff noted above is great, but I would point out there are other competent person schemes see below:
    You should use a competent person for the work, links below

    In Scotland:
    Individuals regitered;
    http://www.sbsa.gov.uk/register/ListAC.asp
    Companies registered
    http://www.sbsa.gov.uk/register/SearchCo.asp?T=Construction&ID=2

    In England and Wales:
    http://www.competentperson.co.uk

    Hope this helps
    baldly going on...
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  • jobbingmusicianjobbingmusician Forumite, Board Guide
    20.3K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Intrepid Forum Explorer
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    Just a tip for those of you who have consumer units for the first time - they can be very sensitive, so don't panic if the lights go out - a blown lightbulb can tend to trip the fuse. Just keep a torch near the unit, and flick the switch back into position :D
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  • baldelectricianbaldelectrician Forumite
    2.5K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
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    just a quick point about lamps tripping MCB.

    If you buy branded lamps (phillips; osram ;sylvania) this is unlikely to happen.
    If you buy lamps from the supermarket (own brand, cheapo) these will cause the MCB to trip.
    baldly going on...
  • ksh123ksh123 Forumite
    1.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
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    Completely agree with the advice about trip boxes, tho I hadn't thought of having a regular check and shall think about that soon.

    Similarly NEVER EVER neglect to use a circuit breaker plug when using outdoor elelctricals like a lawn mower, headge trimmer, mulcher et etc.

    My 21 year old daughter, who often gets impatient with mum for saying time and again, "don't forget to use the circuit breaker!" when she is doing a job for me outside, learnt the value of this the other day.

    She was up a small step ladder trimming the hedge with our electrical trimmer, a job she has done lots of times, when yes, you've guessed it - she cut straight through the wire. If it weren't for the circuit breaker tripping and immediately cutting off the electricity supply the combination of the shock and the fall would almost certainly have finished her off.

    You should have seen her ashen face when she came to tell me what had happened and I go cold thinking about it again now.

    Circuit breaker plugs are so cheap - usually between £7 and £12 - but they are certainly worth their weight in gold!

    Take care x
    Stop looking for answers....
    The most you can hope for are clues.....:)
  • ollykollyk Forumite
    597 posts
    ✭✭
    Alan50 wrote:
    Suprising how we take electricity for granted, I still think (passed statistics) that there have been no fatalities where an RCD has been installed in an electrical installation.

    Good luck

    Alan (NICEIC electrical domestic installer)

    see:- https://www.NICEIC.com for electrical safety advice

    Are there alternatives to NICEIC? If so, what are they?

    I would like to ask Martin, considering he is a MSE, if he would like to change his original insert posted at the top of the OP's post, to reflect a broader choice and not miss-guide people into thinking there is only the one option...?
  • jedeyejedeye Forumite
    103 posts
    My parents home is a typical mix of old house with new extension and then last year they bought a new kitchen and had to rewire the kitchen and install a RCD box for the house electrics. Unfortunetely or fortunetely this has caused the front room power sockets to fail (I think they are unsheathed wire!!).

    Does anyone know of any discounts applicable for OAP's (over 70's) to rewire a house?

    Thanks,

    jedeye
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