Wood burning stove installation

I've been thinking about installing a wood burning stove for some time in order to:
A) Reduce my horrendous LPG costs (2.5 K/yr)
B) Use an available and free source of wood which I have around the propoerty
C) For asthetics.

I've trawlwed through various websites and am aware that there are a significant range of quality and prices. I am keen on a pedestall type stove and have narrowed the choice down to a Dovre or a Aduro model. These are not cheap at approx £1500 plus VAT, however I didn't expect the flue pipe and installation to be so high e.g. I am being quoted 2K plus VAT (1k for pipe and 1k for installation). The installation is straightforward, out the back of the stove and vertically up 5m through a ceiling then a slated roof). The overall cost of the stove, hearth, flue and installation is 4.5K. Trouble is when I look at the internet prices I reckon I can save considerably on stove and flue but none of the local installers will look at the job unless you buy the hardware from them at their inflated prices! My questions are:
1) Does this sound expensive?
2) Am I permitted to install DIY (Scotland).
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Replies

  • weldawelda Forumite
    600 Posts
    Hi ARD, you make no mention of a chimney, so I assume is without one?

    I'm no expert, but I would say your estimates will be higher than a standard install (if there is such a thing) of course a fitter will add "his bit on" for parts ect.

    Again if no chimney, different ball game for install, speak with local planners for further advice...2.5k a year OUCH!!

    Cheers.....
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    its the need of the double line flue which is where most the cost is, I think we got ours very cheap at £50 a metre compared to some places which were charging £100

    Yes you can do a self install in Scotland - you need to following the building regs and get the work signed off
  • My Dunsley Yorshire was installed this summer into my clay pot lined chimney. I used a HETAS registered installer he charged £720 including opening up the fireplace bigger, rendering it out, supply purpose made stainless adapter from stove pipe to chimney and stove pipe also few extra quarry tiles on the hearth.
    Border Sweep is his business name in South Yorkshire.
    Brian
  • edited 27 September 2011 at 2:38PM
    hethmarhethmar Forumite
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    edited 27 September 2011 at 2:38PM
    It is the cost of the twin walled freestanding flue which is adding to the price Im afraid. Not a simple or cheap job and not one really for a diyer -unlike, a normal internal flue. Though if you feel competent you should be able to get plenty of technical advice from the sales people. And then have it checked out and signed off by local building control (about £100 + VAT in England).

    Brian's price above cannot be any comparison Im afraid; it sounds like the installer hasnt lined the chimney with a stainless steel flue at all, let alone the cost of a twin walled freestanding one.

    You could always buy the stove online to save money and then get a local installer to do just the chimney? Stoves online supply stoves and the materials and may have a registered installer on their list in your area who would do labour only?
  • "Brian's price above cannot be any comparison Im afraid; it sounds like the installer hasnt lined the chimney with a stainless steel flue at all, let alone the cost of a twin walled freestanding one."

    That's right I didnt need a liner as the chimney is lined with pot pipes in good condition. I agree the twin wall stainless is expensive.
    My mate had an old chimney lined with stainless a good grade as there's two or three grades available. It cost him arond £1,000 fitted including a new pot for the top.

    Brian
  • hethmarhethmar Forumite
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    The OP has to use just about the most expensive stainless steel freestanding product as he has not got a chimney, basically its creating a chimney in the property - very expensive materials, plus things like collars where it goes through ceilings and roofs and supports on the roof.

    Brian, be careful with clay liners, they are being phased out as they have no flexibility in them - a fire within them can cause them to crack.
  • edited 27 September 2011 at 5:31PM
    782sirbrian782sirbrian Forumite
    21 Posts
    edited 27 September 2011 at 5:31PM
    Thanks for the advice about the pot pipe liners, I have the chinney swept regular and do it myself inbetween. The chimney's been in use for 50 years now. The pipes are 9 inch square on the outside, about 7 inch or just above inside.
    Brian
  • I have seen a lot of advertisements for cheap multi-fuel burning stoves for around £350+. I live in a relatively new home with a fireplace that has never been lit, so I doubt it would need any sort of linning, etc.

    My question is how much would it cost to get my fireplace openned up wide enough to fit a multi-fuel stove in it?

    Please advise
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    Jmarles wrote: »
    I have seen a lot of advertisements for cheap multi-fuel burning stoves for around £350+. I live in a relatively new home with a fireplace that has never been lit, so I doubt it would need any sort of linning, etc.

    My question is how much would it cost to get my fireplace openned up wide enough to fit a multi-fuel stove in it?

    Please advise


    Whats wrong with the open fire???

    Im not being funny but an open fire in a new home can be as efficient as a stove - esp a cheap stove.

    You would need to get in a few builders to quote you a price for the opening. Add that to the cost of the stove and the cost of the install and you really could be better off with just the open fire
  • hethmarhethmar Forumite
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    It unusual for a new house to have an open fire place that actually works (we get called to quite a few where the architects hasnt taken into account there is actually a relationship between the fireplace opening area/diameter of the flueway). I think your first job would be to call in a sweep to check out the flueway and he can advise on whether it would be ok for a stove.
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