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READ ME FIRST PLEASE . . . Useful links, Resources and FAQs

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READ ME FIRST PLEASE . . . Useful links, Resources and FAQs

edited 27 February 2012 at 11:45AM in Consumer Rights
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squeakysqueaky Forumite
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edited 27 February 2012 at 11:45AM in Consumer Rights
Welcome to the Consumer Rights board

The regular members have contributed the following list of sites that you will find helpful, along with some definitions and brief outlines of some of the legislation plus some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

Suggestions for additions or updates etc can be made on this thread:-

Helpful links ... Suggestions please



Read Me's Quick Links
  • [post=41506542]The MoneySavingExpert articles[/post]
  • [post=41506560]Shopping Tips Before Buying[/post]
  • [post=41543332]Useful links[/post]
  • [post=41583292]Useful threads[/post]
  • [post=41583302]Useful Places List[/post]
  • [post=41583298]Resources[/post]
  • [post=41583464]Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)[/post] (Direct links listed below)
    1. [post=41583464]Mispriced items - Sold out?[/post]
    2. [post=41583528]Does a shop have to sell at the advertised price?[/post]
    3. [post=41807104]When can I get a refund? Or am I entitled to only a repair or replacement?[/post]
    4. [post=41866860]How are partial refunds for price/age/usage calculated?[/post]
    5. [post=42130720]Can companies charge for admin or restocking?[/post]
    6. [post=42847344]Being chased over debt?[/post]
    7. [post=42863382]Cancelling a contract signed at home?[/post]
    8. [post=42873192]Is a deposit ever refundable[/post]
    9. [post=42874252]When is an on-line contract formed? (They took my money - but then declined the order)[/post]
    10. [post=42875358]Shopping abroad - help with finding consumer advice and aid.[/post]
  • [post=41583538]Expanded FAQ answers[/post]
    [post=41583538]Must shops sell at the advertised price?[/post]
This
editor
is a pain

Common abbreviations
DPAX's - Data Protection Act

DSRX's - Distance Selling Regulations

GRO BMD - General Register Office - Birth Marriage Death index

LBAX's - Letter Before Action (see Resources)

OPXX's - Opening Post or Opening Poster

POPX's - Proof Of Purchase

RMAX's - Return Merchandise Authorisation

SOGA's - Sale Of Goods Act

T&C'sX - Terms and Conditions




.
Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
«1

Replies

  • edited 23 February 2012 at 11:45AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
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    edited 23 February 2012 at 11:45AM
    .
    .
    The MoneySavingExpert articles:


    The quick links for these articles can be found at the top of the main listing page for this forum:- Consumer Rights

    Which ones should you read? Martin would say all of them!

    Here's what each one covers...

    Consumer Rights: "Give me my money back!"

    This article covers what you should know about your basic rights, some Do's & Don'ts when complaining, your rights when buying goods and services (even freebies!), buying on the web, a complaints check list and more.
    Consumer Rights Mini-Guide: Foldout to pop in your wallet

    The main points of the Consumer Rights article in a handy single page print out that you can fold and keep in a wallet or purse. It will help you make sure that you mention the right rules/regulations when making a complaint and not let yourself get "fobbed off" by "company rules".
    Consumer Rights: "How to complain"

    This article covers how to push your complaint to the max. It includes free template letters for faulty goods and shoddy services.
    Consumer Rights Mini-Guide: Foldout to pop in your wallet

    The main points of the Consumer Rights article in a handy single page print out that you can fold and keep in a wallet or purse. It will help you make sure that you mention the right rules/regulations when making a complaint and not let yourself get "fobbed off" by "company rules".
    Section 75 refunds: Free protection for ALL spending

    You have legal protection when buying goods (between £100 & £30,000) with your credit card, even if the company that you bought from goes bust! This guide is a must read if you bought anything anywhere with your card.
    Visa / Mastercard chargeback: Protection for debit card purchases

    There's valuable hidden protection on Visa or Mastercard credit and debit cards, whether from Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds or any other bank. It's called 'chargeback' and means if you don't get the goods you bought, you may be able to get your money back.
    Administration Help: Reclaim your cash from companies

    When a firm goes bust it is placed in Administration. This is a clear and simple explanation of how it all works, where you are in the pecking order of who gets their money back, and how to make the best of your chances of recovering your own money
    Your Financial Rights: Complain, get help & compensation

    Dealing with financial matters (banks, finance companies) can be difficult. This article helps keep it simple and shows you how to use the "big guns" - the Financial Ombudsman.
    Restaurant Rights: Bad service/food, what can you do?

    Whether it's Claridges, Pizza Express or Burger King with a voucher, you've got rights when eating in a restaurant.

    So whether your question's can you get free tap water? Is the service charge a must? How to split the bill? Or what if the food ain't up to scratch?... this quick Q&A should help.
    Failed delivery - Fight back.

    It's enough to make you growl: you've been told you need to be in for a pre-arranged delivery or service installation – sometimes taking a day off work – then you wait in all day and they're hours late, or don't turn up at all.

    Yet you can fight back if you know your rights. You may even be able to force compensation for the lost time. The aim here is to be reasonable, but with our often rotten delivery culture, we need to start to make them understand there could be consequences when they fail to, er ... deliver.

    Discussion threads:

    Main discussion thread: Delivery Rights discussion thread.

    Amazon specific thread: Delivery Rights: Amazon

    Debenhams specific thread Delivery Rights: Debehams

    Dixons specific thread Delivery rights: Dixons

    Play.com specific thread: Delivery Rights: Play.com

    Tescos specific thread Delivery Rights: Tescos
    25 ways to stop scams: As scams get clever we need to, too!

    Scams no longer target just the easily duped! But with more knowledge comes more power. Shop the right way and you're less likely to get caught out.

    This quick guide shows what scams to look out for, helps you become a more powerful shopper – and saves you money before you’ve even opened your wallet.


    .
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 14 April 2011 at 8:36AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    edited 14 April 2011 at 8:36AM
    .
    Shopping Tips for Before Buying

    .
    We strongly advise members to read the Terms and Conditions (T&C's) of a company whenever possible and especially when buying on line or from a catalogue etc.

    Many T&C's need to cover the relevant legislation and can sometimes seem quite complex. If you find your eyes blurring and your brain turning into grey flupp - at the very least find those sections dealing with:-
    • confirmation of a sale agreement
    • returns and refunds
    • failure of delivery
    • damage in transit
    This is even more important when buying at a distance, i.e. on-line because there is a possibility that you may, for one of any number of reasons, need to return it.
    .

    .
    When buying services such as Insurance, Mobile contracts, Magazine subscriptions etc. which may involve Auto Renewal make sure that you check the following:-
    • How much and how often monies will be taken
    • How to cancel and how much notice needs to be given
    .
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 15 April 2013 at 10:21AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    edited 15 April 2013 at 10:21AM
    .
    Useful links:

    .
    Sale of Goods Act 1979:-


    Direct.gov Consumer Rights
    Advice and information on your legal rights as a consumer before and after you have purchased goods or services, and guidelines on how to complain.

    http://www.oft.gov.uk/business-advice/treating-customers-fairly/sogahome
    The OFT's new look web page with help for businesses and customers, so you can see both side at one place.

    .

    .
    Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982

    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/Consumerrights/DG_182935
    If you are using a service such as hiring a builder or using a mechanic then you are covered by the Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982. This means that any goods supplied must be of satisfactory quality and any service you buy must be...

    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1982/29
    The Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982 Chapter 29 - The legislation in full.
    .

    .
    Distance Selling Regulations:-

    Office of Fair Trading's Guide to the Distance Selling Regulations.
    Buying goods and services over the internet, by phone or by mail order are all examples of distance selling.
    Guidance aimed at assisting consumer organisations and to provide consistent advice to businesses and consumers on their rights and responsibilities under the regulations.
    .


    Other Links:


    The magic EU 2 / 6 year "guarantee" explained

    The UE Sale of Goods Act (SOGA)

    Full implementation can be read here if interested:
    http://ec.europa.eu/consumers/cons_i...7_EN_final.pdf

    Or just admendments here:
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2...-act-1979/made


    Debt Free Wannabe sticky:- OFT Debt Collection & letter Guidance

    And also see on DFW:-Standard Template Letters to credit collectors etc.
    A great guide to dealing with collection agencies, whether by mail or phone.

    ASA - Advertising Standards Authority
    The ASA is the UK's independent regulator of advertising across all media, now including marketing on websites.


    http://www.out-law.com/page-394
    An explanation of on-line contract law ... lawyers break down the process of contract formation into three stages: an invitation to treat, an offer and an acceptance. The distinction between the three stages is not always immediately obvious...

    http://www.thesmartwaytopay.co.uk/DirectDebitExplained/Pages/DirectDebitGuarantee.aspx
    The efficiency and security of Direct Debit is monitored and protected by your own bank or building society. The Direct Debit Guarantee applies to all Direct Debits. It protects you in the rare event that anything goes wrong.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invitation_to_treat
    and
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/offer_and_acceptance
    Explanations of the buying process and of company tenders and contracts.

    http://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/
    Covers Sale of Goods, On-line Shopping, Making Complaints, Rip-Offs & Scams, and more.

    The Furniture Ombudsman
    The Furniture Ombudsman (TFO) is an independent organisation which specialises in providing Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) solutions for consumers of the furniture, home improvement and floor coverings industry.

    Unsolicited goods (Can I keep them?)
    You must take good care of goods which have been left with you. You may be held legally responsible if the goods are lost, stolen or damaged while in your care. However, the amount of care you need to take depends on whether or not you have a contract with the owner. (see the above link for more)
    See also: Abandoned Goods

    Railway fares/fines/penalties
    A forum where you may be able to find help if you have an issue with railway charges (http://www.railforums.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=105)



    The Better Business Bureau This is an American site which may be of help to members who are experiencing problems when buying from the USA.


    Re: Buying cars at distance - The OFT has published a guide called Cars and other vehicles sold by distance means (May 2005) Re: Play.com (located in Jersey) and SOGA:- http://www.jerseylaw.je/law/display.aspx?url=lawsinforce/htm/LawFiles/2009/L-14-2009.htm

    Re: Gym Contracts - OFT investigates gym contracts and Tens of thousands can cancel gym contracts MSE news story



    .
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 29 September 2011 at 5:38AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    edited 29 September 2011 at 5:38AM
    Useful Threads

    Tips on negotiating with companies
    Read tips from members and add your own.


    Refunding Albert Hall event tickets (any event tickets)
    www.seatwave.com/Buy Tickets on Seatwave for all Concerts, Theatre and Sporting Events. We are Europe's largest 100% guaranteed fan to fan ticket exchange
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 25 February 2012 at 6:56AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
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    edited 25 February 2012 at 6:56AM
    .
    Resources:



    How to complain - template letters

    The Direct.gov Consumer Rights section has a number of template letters that you can use. Just pick one to suit your situation.

    Help with Small Claims: MSE Article - Consumer Rights: "How to complain"

    Help with Letter Before Action: https://consumer-tools.direct.gov.uk...before_action/

    the MCOL website
    Money Claim On Line - Her Majesty's Courts Service Internet based service for claimants and defendants is a simple, convenient and secure way of making or responding to a money claim on the internet. You will need to register to make use of this service.

    ......


    www.saynoto0870.com
    List of alternative numbers for many companies - avoid paying higher charges for calls where possible.

    www.0800buster.co.uk
    Some mobile phones charge for 0800 calls. This free(*) service can switch your call to a landline - so use your inclusive minutes.
    * If your contract does not allow calls to landlines you will be charged landline rates which may still be cheaper. Read the site carefully and also check your mobile Terms and Conditions before using.

    whois?
    Use this website to look up who owns a commercial website (with registered address and contact details).


    ......



    Citizen's Advice Bureau
    The Citizens Advice service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free, independent and confidential advice... to find your local bureau use the search towards the top right of this page.

    Office of Fair Trading
    Enforces consumer protection law and competition law, reviews proposed mergers and conducts market studies. Decisions, and press notices. Trading Standards
    Trading standards professionals enforce consumer related legislation, legislation which is vast and constantly evolving and changing.
    TSI is not able to offer consumer advice.
    The government service Consumer Direct offers advice on 08454 040506 or via www.direct.gov Consumer Rights. Trading Standards is a local authority service. Online help may be available through your local trading standards service website for both consumers and business. Use the post code search to find your local office.

    Financial Ombudsman Service
    # It’s our job to sort out individual complaints that consumers and financial businesses haven't been able to resolve themselves...
    # We can look at complaints about a wide range of financial matters – from insurance and mortgages to investments and credit.


    The Information Commissioners Office
    The Information Commissioner’s Office is the UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, promoting openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals.



    .
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 6 August 2011 at 8:31AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
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    edited 6 August 2011 at 8:31AM
    Useful Places List



    Brighthouse:- http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk...urchase-Stores Part way down the page is Brighthouse topics area.




    .
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 8 March 2011 at 8:33AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
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    edited 8 March 2011 at 8:33AM
    .
    Frequently Asked Questions

    The regular members have contributed the following list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), most of which have brief answers and a link to help you find more detail which may apply to your query.

    .
    Mispriced items - Sold out?

    "I ordered a X item for £y and my money was taken by online company Z who are saying that it's a misprice/sold out. It was a bargain. Can I sue or order them to make up the difference"

    http://www.out-law.com/page-394 helps clear up queries.

    Note: Read the T&C to state when a contract has been accepted (usually on delivery) - online companies are no more than large shop windows.


    .
    Scroll down to see more FAQs
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 8 March 2011 at 8:36AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
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    edited 8 March 2011 at 8:36AM
    .
    Frequently Asked Questions


    .
    A shop has advertised a product at £10. I have tried to buy it but they have said the product is actually £20 and they made a mistake. Do they have to sell me the product at the advertised price of £10?

    Briefly:- The shop can refuse to sell you the product and they are under no obligation to. Only when they have accepted your offer is the contract complete and they are bound to sell you the product for £10. Some shops will sell you an item at the marked price just for the sake of good customer service but they are not under a legal obligation to do so.

    An excellent post on this subject, well worth reading, has been copied lower down this thread. To skip straight to it - [post=41583538]Click Here[/post]
    .


    .
    Scroll down to see more FAQs
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 2 December 2011 at 11:32AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
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    edited 2 December 2011 at 11:32AM
    .
    FAQ expansion - Must shops sell at the advertised price?

    (Contributed by mo786uk)



    Do shops have to sell goods at the advertised price?

    The simple answer is NO!

    - you cannot force a shop to sell you something

    - this applies to correctly and incorrectly priced items

    - this applies to ALL types of shops - whether they are online internet stores or offline physical stores

    - internet shops can to refuse to honour prices even after they have taken your money

    - if you think a retailer is intentionally trying to misleading with pricing then you should report this to your local Trading Standards, which can be done via Consumer Direct (08454 04 05 06)

    A more detailed explanation of the law can be found below.


    A shop has advertised a product at £10. I have tried to buy it but they have said the product is actually £20 and they made a mistake. Do they have to sell me the product at the advertised price of £10?


    This is a question best answered from both a civil and criminal point of view.

    Civil law = your rights as a consumer against a business. If your civil rights have been breached you can take a business to civil court and one remedy is monetary damages.

    Criminal law = action that can be taken by a public body to prosecute a business for breaking the law. This usually ends in a fine or prison.

    Civil

    When you buy an item from a shop you and the shop are entering into a contract. Let take an example of buying a product from a supermarket.

    You go into the shop and see a price label for £10. This is an invitation to treat. This is basically the shop saying we will take £10 for the item if you are willing to offer it.

    When you take the item to the till you are making an offer. Which is basically saying 'I am willing to offer you £10 for this item'.

    The £10 you are offering is consideration. This is you promising to pay them £10. The shops promise or consideration is the item they are going to give you for the £10. Most contracts have to have some form of consideration (although not all).

    Finally, the shop can decide whether to accept or not. At this stage they can still refuse to sell you the product and they are under no obligation to. Only when they have accepted your offer is the contract complete and they are bound to sell you the product for £10.

    Both parties must be willing to enter in a contract and there must be a meeting of the minds. This is where both sides are totally clear what the terms of the contract are. Clearly if the shop and customer disagree on the price there cannot be a meeting of the minds.

    Some shops will sell you an item for the price they have marked it just for the sake of good customer service but they are not under a legal obligation to do so.

    So, effectively there can be no contract until the shop accepts.

    From a practical point of view it is pretty easy to see this in practice in a real life shop as the contract usually complete when they take your money and give you the item.

    Its a bit more difficult with online transactions because it is not always clear when a contract has been formed. In the past online retailers would accept as soon as you made a payment. However due to a few cases where shops lost money through pricing mistakes most shops now only accept your offer when they send the item out. This means even if you pay for an item, the shop has not actually accepted your offer even though they have taken your money - this means they can cancel the order. You should read the terms and conditions of the retailer to see what their stance is on pricing errors and when the contract is formed.

    Finally, there may arise a situation where you have managed to pay for an item at a lower price and the shop has only realised after you have paid for the goods and taken the item (where the contract is complete for all intents and purposes). In this scenario the shop has sold you the item and you are not under an obligation to pay the difference, although you can do if you want to.

    Criminal

    Does a shop have to display prices?

    The Price Marking Order 2004 is the legislation that makes shops have to display prices for goods. Prices must include VAT and be clearly legible. Items do not have to be individually price (i.e they can use a price list) but the prices should be available so that the customer does not have to ask for them.

    There is currently no law that specifies that prices must be displayed for services. This is currently controlled by the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 under misleading omissions. What this means is that there is no blanket answer for every situation, instead it depends on whether the lack of price can influence customers decision to buy. Lets say you go to a bar and order a lemonade. There are no prices listed. Chances are you expect the drink to cost around £1. If it does in fact cost £1 you are probably happy with that and the lack of a price list hasn't influenced your decision to buy. Now lets say the lemonade costs £5. Clearly this could now mean you would not have ordered the drink had you know this. This sort of scenario is where the lack of pricing could be a misleading omission. In my opinion its a bit of a flaw in the law(!).

    Was it a simple mistake or are the shop purposely misleading customers with incorrect pricing?

    This is all covered by the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. Without going into too much depth it can be a criminal offence for a shop to mislead consumers about the price of a product and the way in which it was calculated.

    This legislation also prevents businesses from purposefully taking orders for a product they know they cannot supply so that they can get you into their shop (bait advertising) or from taking orders for a product but then trying to get the customer to buy another product (bait and switch). Mind you there is criteria for deciding what these are, but I have simplified it here for you.

    So finally, the question is was it just a mistake? This really depends on whether the shop changes the mistake ASAP and whether they do it often. In the grand scheme of things a pricing error is no big deal for the authorities to bother taking action on. I would however suggest that you report all incidents where you believe the shop has tried to deceive you. The more information the authorities have the easier it is for them to see which companies are clearly breaking the law.
    .
    If you found this FAQ helpful please thank mo786uk in the [post=41472662]original post.[/post]
    .
    .

    .
    Scroll down to see more FAQs
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • edited 14 April 2011 at 8:55AM
    squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
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    edited 14 April 2011 at 8:55AM
    .
    Frequently Asked Questions

    .
    .
    When can I get a refund? When will I be entitled to only a repair or replacement?

    If you are returning goods that are not of satisfactory quality or not as described and you inform the trader of the problem within a reasonable period of time, you may be entitled to full refund. If you have had some use from the goods or have had them for a while before you take them back you could ask for a repair or a replacement item. You, as the consumer, have the option of which solution you would like, however you must not require the trader to repair or replace the goods if this would be too costly, as compared to another remedy.

    See: www.direct.gov Returning faulty items


    .

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    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
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