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Ground Source Heat Pumps

1.1K replies 315.5K views
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Replies

  • edited 9 January 2011 at 7:15PM
    weldawelda Forumite
    600 posts
    edited 9 January 2011 at 7:15PM
    geotherm wrote: »
    There is no real difference. Winter temps where we are in central Italy close to the Sibillini mountains get low in the winter, albeit not as bad as in the UK this year.

    Geotherm, I'm no geologist, but to say "there is no real difference" I would say is not factual, geology between the two I would say is great, Italy is famous from north to south for it old Roman Spa towns, Acqui Terme near Turin in the north is one that comes to mind, there is also still volcanic activity at various parts too.

    Which in effect, is of great benefit if you have GSHP and residing in Italy, where as, Romans gave up searching for Spa's, certainly in Scotland, they build a big wall instead to keep the cold and rain in!!

    Same goes for volcanic activity, the first and last time I felt the ground shake here, I think I was 15 years old :D

    :beer:
  • lovesgshplovesgshp Forumite
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    Welda.
    There is no major difference in the ground temperature at 1.5 mtrs depth whether you live in the north of England or the north of Italy. We have no volcanos in this area, but do get seismic activity where the walls actually wobble like jelly, but something you get used to after the first couple of times.
    Please check actual facts, as we do not all live on volcanos here.
    As Manuel says in Fawlty Towers: " I Know Nothing"
  • edited 9 January 2011 at 11:09PM
    weldawelda Forumite
    600 posts
    edited 9 January 2011 at 11:09PM
    geotherm wrote: »
    Welda.
    There is no major difference in the ground temperature at 1.5 mtrs depth whether you live in the north of England or the north of Italy. We have no volcanos in this area, but do get seismic activity where the walls actually wobble like jelly, but something you get used to after the first couple of times.
    Please check actual facts, as we do not all live on volcanos here.

    Geotherm, it was a genuine pertinent question, plus I never said all in Italy live on volcanos, certainly no volcano's live or dud, bar a hot thermal spa where my sis has a 2nd home with her hubby outside Acqui Terme.

    As I stated at start of my post, I am no geologist, however that said, surely there are parts of the world where temperatures vary at 1.5 metre, more so in areas if we can call them "hot spots" such as Acqui Terme for example, where geothermal activity around this old spa town has been studied for decades?

    :beer:
  • Geotherm keep posting it is interesting.

    Do ground source heating systems produce much noise ?

    If I was going for it I would have to try the borehole method. I just think it would be far too expensive.
  • lovesgshplovesgshp Forumite
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    Ok Welda. I was just referring to European areas. There are of course variations e.g. Lanzarote where the volcanic activity heats the ground in certain areas. We just have to take an average and work from that, unless there is more specific area data.
    As Manuel says in Fawlty Towers: " I Know Nothing"
  • lovesgshplovesgshp Forumite
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    Globalds. Think of the noise a refrigerator makes and that is close to a heat pump. I would try to go for a compact collector system against a borehole.
    As Manuel says in Fawlty Towers: " I Know Nothing"
  • weldawelda Forumite
    600 posts
    geotherm wrote: »
    Ok Welda. I was just referring to European areas. There are of course variations e.g. Lanzarote where the volcanic activity heats the ground in certain areas. We just have to take an average and work from that, unless there is more specific area data.

    Thanks for prompt reply Geotherm, I was curious if perhaps your figures were parhaps based on you being in a "hot spot" area of Italy?

    I just replied to another post concerning ASHP, where I attended a seminar, basically was run by sales people, my many questions were never answered, I left a sceptic on certain areas of renewables, based purely on "spin" replies. Plus I was not alone being left a sceptic, hopefully you can offer more technical, specific data?

    :beer:
  • thechippythechippy Forumite
    1.9K posts
    There is a major factor to consider with gshp's....

    They are ok at first, as the surrounding temp is more stable in the borehole or ground loop than an ashp.

    However, over a period of years, the temp around the borehole / loop gradually declines and the environment is unable to replace the latent heat at the same rate as it's extracted. This means that the efficiency of the system will gradually decline. This can and DOES happen, but it can be several years before it's noticed.
    Happiness, is a Kebab called Doner.....:heart2::heart2:
  • weldawelda Forumite
    600 posts
    Spot on Chippy, system basically sucks out more heat energy that can be replaced by normal solar activity. Bore hole and surrounding area is froze!!

    :beer:
  • lovesgshplovesgshp Forumite
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    Welda
    I will answer everything that I can on the subject without any spin or sales talk. I have only association with a well established Italian Geothermal company (10 years old ) and none with any in the UK.
    As Manuel says in Fawlty Towers: " I Know Nothing"
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