MSE News: Minister answers concerns on lone parent benefits

edited 27 December 2010 at 4:51AM in Benefits & Tax Credits
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  • seven-day-weekendseven-day-weekend Forumite
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    ceridwen wrote: »
    With the fact that the age of youngest child having been reduced to 7 now for eligibility for Income Support - have any safeguards been put in place to stop women deliberately having another child once their youngest reaches 6 years old (ie specifically in order that they are entitled to a further 7 years on Income Support)?

    I've certainly heard of at least one woman making a comment to the effect of "My youngest will soon be an age where the Government will expect me to go back to work - I'd better have another one quick to make sure I dont have to..."

    I don't see how you can legislate against having children.....
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  • Indie_KidIndie_Kid Forumite
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    Whilst understanding the difficulties about childcare for a single parent, maybe several single parents could work together to arrange time off for the school holidays and look after each others' children? Three parents working together could plug the six-week summer holiday, couldn't they?

    This is surely what couples do, so two or three single parents working together could do the same thing.

    Of course there are still the problems of children with disabilities, but afaik these parents are not expected to look for work when the child is five.

    What about before and after school?

    As for your last comment - it's only if they receive mid or high rate care. So, it would still be difficult to find child care for a child on low rate care. I sometimes went to clubs during the holidays and struggled - because I couldn't join in with most of the activities due to y disabilities.
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  • FBabyFBaby Forumite
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    Whilst understanding the difficulties about childcare for a single parent, maybe several single parents could work together to arrange time off for the school holidays and look after each others' children? Three parents working together could plug the six-week summer holiday, couldn't they?

    This is surely what couples do, so two or three single parents working together could do the same thing.

    Of course there are still the problems of children with disabilities, but afaik these parents are not expected to look for work when the child is five.

    When you want to find a way you can and childcare is just another exemple of it, except for children with disabilities.
  • seven-day-weekendseven-day-weekend Forumite
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    sh1305 wrote: »
    What about before and after school?

    As for your last comment - it's only if they receive mid or high rate care. So, it would still be difficult to find child care for a child on low rate care. I sometimes went to clubs during the holidays and struggled - because I couldn't join in with most of the activities due to y disabilities.


    Well I still think they could work something out between themselves in the same way that couples do. If there are three single parents (for example) pooling their childcare together, surely they could manage something? It would be cheaper (or free) too!

    I agree that children with disabilities would be much harder to find childcare for. :(
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  • Indie_KidIndie_Kid Forumite
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    Well I still think they could work something out between themselves in the same way that couples do. If there are three single parents (for example) pooling their childcare together, surely they could manage something? It would be cheaper (or free) too!

    It's not as simple as you make it out to be. I'm sure there's new rules that came in recently about what you're suggesting.
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  • edited 1 January 2011 at 12:43PM
    seven-day-weekendseven-day-weekend Forumite
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    edited 1 January 2011 at 12:43PM
    sh1305 wrote: »
    It's not as simple as you make it out to be. I'm sure there's new rules that came in recently about what you're suggesting.

    I think it IS simple. The logistics of it may need some careful planning however.

    What rules would these be then? Are people not allowed to babysit any more without a host of qualifications and an OFSTED report?

    When my son was young (admittedly it was 25 years ago), he needed after-school care for about half an hour so a friend looked after him . He walked home from school with her son and she just had him in her house until I got there. It was just the same as if he had gone round to play with her son.

    Are people not allowed to do that any more?

    Edit: Yes they are! http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/oct/12/friends-childcare-legal-balls
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1219915/Friends-look-children-fear-prosecution-says-Ed-Balls.html
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/education/article6872120.ece

    So unless the Coalition have changed this, it is perfectly OK for two or three friends to share childcare arrangements providing no money changes hands.

    Glad Labour did something useful whilst in power!
    (AKA HRH_MUngo)
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
  • ceridwen wrote: »
    With the fact that the age of youngest child having been reduced to 7 now for eligibility for Income Support - have any safeguards been put in place to stop women deliberately having another child once their youngest reaches 6 years old (ie specifically in order that they are entitled to a further 7 years on Income Support)?

    I've certainly heard of at least one woman making a comment to the effect of "My youngest will soon be an age where the Government will expect me to go back to work - I'd better have another one quick to make sure I dont have to..."
    What?!
    How can you possibly do that.
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • sh1305 wrote: »
    It's not as simple as you make it out to be. I'm sure there's new rules that came in recently about what you're suggesting.
    Are you thinking about a case just recently where two police ladies looked after each other child?
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • When my son was young (admittedly it was 25 years ago), he needed after-school care for about half an hour so a friend looked after him .
    So a friend looked after your child, I'm assuming someone you had known for years? Someone you were happy and comfortable leaving your child with.
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • edited 1 January 2011 at 12:46PM
    OldernotwiserOldernotwiser
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    edited 1 January 2011 at 12:46PM
    I don't see how you can legislate against having children.....

    You could stop paying CTC/CB for children born after the parent(s) started to claim benefits.
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