New Car Port - Roofing Materials?

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The cold weather has given me the impetus to get a new car port erected!

I am proposing timber posts and 'wriggly tin' roof with timber joists, bolted to gable wall of house

My questions are:
1 Where can i purchase 'wriggly tin', including translucent panels
2 Where can i look up design loads and timber sizes for roof joists.

I'm sure others have probably done similar exercises so looking to tap into previous experiences.

Thanks

Comments

  • ormus
    ormus Posts: 42,714 Forumite
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    goto wickes for all your materials. large pvc corrugated roofing sheets are about 8 quid each.
    you need to replace them every ten yrs or so.

    forget the tin ones.
    Get some gorm.
  • spartacus173500
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    Excellent - thank you.


    Even found the attached on the Wickes website:
    "Corrugated Roofing & Cladding - Good Idea Leaflet 44"

    Should keep me busy the rest of the day working out design / materials needed.

    Anyone and ideas re discount codes for Wickes, or where to get materials at best price?
  • ormus
    ormus Posts: 42,714 Forumite
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    http://www.buildeazy.com/carport_imp.html

    heres an example of a carport design. there are loads of em on the net.
    just use it as a basis and modify it to your needs.
    Get some gorm.
  • Vibrant
    Vibrant Posts: 311 Forumite
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    The bitumen corrugated sheets are very good, easy to work with and seem to last well. I have used them on several sheds and outhouses.
    The clear PVC sheets should last longer than ten years, I used them on my porch and they still look good 20 years on.
    Make sure you use the appropriate fittings for whatever sheet type you choose.
  • knowloads
    Options
    False economy putting cheap stuff up there. Go on e-bay and search roofing they have polycarbonate that can be cut to size (same as conservatory roof) will outlast any of the above and remain light. Steel coated roof sheets for 100 yrs use. You can even walk on these two products for maintaining the walls,windows etc.. happy New Year
  • thickbuilder
    Options
    if you get polycarbonate or pvc corugated use a jigsaw with a metal cutting blade in to cut it
    the timber will be cheaper from a local wood/builders yard than the likes of b&q wickes ect
    tanalised timber will last alot longer than untreated
    i would think twice about walking on a polycarbonate roof
  • ormus
    ormus Posts: 42,714 Forumite
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    the tri-wall ploy is good stuff for the conservatory roof but a waste of money on a car port.
    its expensive too. no real point in insulating the sky.
    my car port roof cost me just over a 100 quid to replace, thatll do for me every 10/15 yrs or so.
    Get some gorm.
  • leveller2911
    leveller2911 Posts: 8,061 Forumite
    edited 29 December 2009 at 5:33PM
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    Try looking at the following: http://www.bliby.net/ They deliver to most areas for £10-00 which is good

    I get most of my polycarbonate,guttering and corregated sheets from here.I agree with another poster that polycarbonate is a better product for a car-port.Twin wall poly is good enough.The only instance I would use the corregated sheets is if the house is older than 1960,s and Polycarbonate looks far too modern.One downside with polycarbonate is it needs cleaning regularly.

    Poly sheets can be cut easily with a 4.5" grinder with a 1mm steel cutting disk,we generally use a cordless power saw with a fine blade and also a jigsaw(not great for cutting straight line ).

    If the OP is going to stand on the car-port they will need to make the joist centres smaller to spread the load.
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