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NEARLY RETIREMENT AGE - and could be about to claim benefit

edited 8 October 2010 at 7:26AM in Over 50s Money Saving
6 replies 1.5K views
NowWhat_2NowWhat_2 Forumite
73 Posts
edited 8 October 2010 at 7:26AM in Over 50s Money Saving
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  • milliemillie Forumite
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    I was made redundant 4 years ago at the age of 58. I had to sign on every 2 weeks just the same as other job seekers and fill in booklets with what I was doing to find work. If I did not fill in the booklet I was told my JSA would be stopped. I used to find it really annoying that others (mostly unemployable yougsters) were just coming in and signing and going off without any hassle. They were searching the computer trying to find me jobs, I was not allowed to say I only wanted part time I had to apply for fulltime jobs. I was also told that after 6 months I would have to sign in every week and could not stipulate what sort of job I wanted and would have to take any job that was available. After being hassled by them for 6 weeks I found a part time job myself. That was 4 years ago may be different now.
  • OldernotwiserOldernotwiser
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    NowWhat wrote: »
    Looks like I'm going to lose my job soon :mad: and have to claim benefit.

    As I've only got a couple of years to go till I retire anyway - my question is in what way the signing-on process differs for those in this age group.

    I know/understand that younger people have to sign on every fortnight/produce all sorts of evidence at regular intervals of the jobs they are asking for - generally have "quite a palaver".

    At our advanced age - does the same thing still apply?

    I recall reading something ages ago that those over 50 only have to sign on once a month and I presume its accepted we have a lot greater difficulty in finding replacement jobs - so we arent hassled for endless proof that we are trying to find a replacement job for the short time left to us.

    Does anyone know how things differ for us nearly-retirees?

    How old are you?
  • FarwayFarway Forumite
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    I was made redundant a few years back, over 60 at time, but like Millie I had to sign on every two weeks and show I was looking for work, in my case they were reasonably understanding given my age, and also my job did not fit into a neat category they could understand [electrical engineer]

    The booklet was not too hard, I made most of it up TBH, things like checked internet, looked in local paper, visited recruitment offices,

    Once I had lost my claim to Contribution based JSA I stopped going to job centre, as I had never intended to work again anyway because my redundancy money & savings ensured I could easily survive until 65 and pension, which I did
  • OldernotwiserOldernotwiser
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    NowWhat wrote: »
    i guess you're thinking of Pension Credit? Not QUITE old enough for that yet.

    I was - worth a try!
  • Newly_retiredNewly_retired Forumite
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    You can get Pension Credit if you are 60 or over. It can be a better option than JSA,( ie. may pay out more ) but it is means tested so you need to provide full details of household income. If you are single you will probably be better off but if you have a spouse/partner with income you probably won't be eligible. If you do get it, you will probably get Housing Benefit if you are renting, and/or Council Tax benefit too.
  • Janey3Janey3 Forumite
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    I retired at 60 and claimed my state pension. My OH was 58 and unemployed after 40 odd years in employment. He had to sign on every fortnight. We were advised to go down the pension credit road with me doing the claiming, which I did and was successful. Consequently OH does not have to sign on anymore.
This discussion has been closed.