'1731, 2033, 9854' blog discussion

135

Replies

  • phil-99 wrote: »
    am continually astonished by the number of people who enter their PIN in plain sight. Sometimes want to tell them - but how?

    "Hi, I notice you enter your PIN in an unobstructed way which allows any passer-by, such as myself, to identify it. You should take preventative measures in the future such as covering your hand and placing your body between the pad and onlookers as best you can. This should help prevent strangers from finding out that your PIN is 3472. Don't worry, I've already debited from your account a nominal fee for my services. Happy to help."
  • I work in retail, and see this lack of PIN-secrecy regularly. Our shop is only a relatively small business that serves, on average, somewhere between 150 to 200 customers a week. However, I see an opportunity for card/PIN theft every single day.

    The worst cases of this I see are in the huge number of customers that keep their PIN written down inside their wallet, usually behind or next to their card, and openly look inside to check it first. I have also had one customer ask for their card back out of the machine because she couldn't remember her PIN: it was written in Tipp-Ex on the card itself! This is most notable among the older generations - perhaps representative of a greater worry about forgetting the PIN. Unfortunately, this also makes them a greater target.

    In this respect, it is also interesting the amount of trust put on the retailer: customers might often ensure that people behind are not watching but, in our shop at least, if they are the only person at the counter they will happily tap away in clear view of myself or other members of staff. I make a point of looking to one side whilst card payments are being made, but have also mentioned to several customers how dangerous it is to have their PIN so insecure.
  • IanOIanO Forumite
    18 Posts
    This article is a useful warning. I guess that we all get a little casual about such things as we become more familiar with them. Hopefully a few people have been saved from a traumatic experience as a result of reading the article.

    And whilst I'm here:
    "pin numbers"!
    PIN = Personal Identification Number
    So I suppose "pin numbers" means personal identification number numbers!
  • Of course all these methods are useful. However, geographical keypads of a mechanical nature should be replaced with touch screens. Thus, the "number" location can change after every use. Much safer and more user friendly. This could be implemented (funded) by selling advertising on the touch screen before the pin is entered. :T
  • I always cup my hand over the machine, even ones that have a plastic shield around them, I do the same at cash machines. A bit paranoid maybe but I think it's better to be safe than sorry.
  • hammodthammodt Forumite
    412 Posts
    IanO wrote: »
    This article is a useful warning. I guess that we all get a little casual about such things as we become more familiar with them. Hopefully a few people have been saved from a traumatic experience as a result of reading the article.

    And whilst I'm here:
    "pin numbers"!
    PIN = Personal Identification Number
    So I suppose "pin numbers" means personal identification number numbers!

    Yes, it's a form of Rhetoric Tautology, or often referred to as RAS syndrome!
    What shall I put here? :confused:
  • IanOIanO Forumite
    18 Posts
    hammodt - ha ha, very good, I've never heard of RAS syndrome before.
  • JimmyTheWigJimmyTheWig Forumite
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    jagu wrote: »
    is it common enough to be a problem? I trust what I read on MSE and I want to continue doing so. I don't like to feel that anecdotes are being presented as indicators of big problems if they aren't.
    The blog is Martin's "space to muse on a wider collection of topics". In his words - "Feel free to read or ignore".

    If this warning was a major part of the weekly email then feel free to question the importance of it. But a blog is an online equivalent to a discussion in the pub and doesn't always have to be of importance.
  • timbim_2timbim_2 Forumite
    1.3K Posts
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    Bah. This is all going to be irrelevant once the science community can perfect a small, accurate fMRI scanner to scan the internal structure of the finger. The pattern of blood vessels is entirely unique to you, and can't be fooled. You need a finger which is alive and in the scanner. That's the future of credit cards.
    Ubuntu is an ancient African word, meaning: 'I can't configure Debian'.
  • kyssynkyssyn Forumite
    156 Posts
    I've seen this happen loads and just today I was in a Starbucks where they have the readers fixed on raised brackets. It meant that I was able to observe the PINs of everyone ahead of me in the (long) queue! I only pay with cash in there.
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