New (?) on-line threat

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Praise, Vent & Warnings
7 replies 1.1K views
Noobie_2Noobie_2 Forumite
205 Posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Praise, Vent & Warnings
New one to me:

Internet 'rogue dialler' swindles have caught out as many as 80,000 home computer users. Rupert Jones reports

Saturday November 27, 2004
The Guardian

……. The virus is often activated by closing an unwanted "pop-up" window on an internet screen. This sends a message to the computer, changing its usual log-on settings. It then surreptitiously diverts the connection into a premium-rate line, typically at £1.50 a minute.

http://money.guardian.co.uk/scamsandfraud/story/0,13802,1360626,00.html

Replies

  • soolinsoolin Forumite, Board Guide
    67.9K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
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    This one isn't new but it is dangerous, it's even been on watchdog a couple of times.

    Anyone that uses a dial up connection to access the internet should make sure they have anti virus software and fire walls and that both are updated daily if possible. My McAfee for instance sometimes updates twice a day, that's how often the virus' change or the hackers update their software.

    It is always believed that these diallers only come from !!!!!! sites, but we picked up one once when I used to be on dial up and all we'd done was to check out some house selling sites and log into a childrens game area Luckily we spotted it within a minute as a warning flashed on my screen that a file had completed downloading and was due to start running automatically. Since we hadn't downloaded anything we shut off the connection and checked the dial up properties and found a rogue dialler.

    Double check all your dial up connections routinely, it should be easy to spot if you have another programme listed as a default dialler.

    Soo
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to [email protected] (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
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  • ROGUE DIALLERS

    BROTHERS, FIGHT BACK


    see .......https://www.premiumratescam.co.uk
    Snootchie Bootchies!
  • Hopefully all those BT users affected will have found the website:

    .........https://www.premiumratescam.co.uk

    and joined in the resistance to payment.

    Spead the word.I bet they succeed

    squire
    Snootchie Bootchies!
  • Noobie_2Noobie_2 Forumite
    205 Posts
    Sorry Squire, haven't followed the link 'cos I'm a bit wary of where I go on the net (sure its OK, but..)

    I get the impression SOME people think it's the 'fault' of BT (or whoever), and that they shouldn't have to pay. I've got no problem if BT (or whoever) decide that, just wondered if anyone has a different view, something along the lines of, you're responsible for the security of your pc??

    Or am I being silly?
  • A lot of these diallers can come through when you are installing a program that is designed to help you! Examples being "toolbars", "password reminders".

    The collection of these type of applications come under the description of malware/adware/spyware/scumware.

    Some are !!!!!! based, some are not.

    Whenever you are considering to install a groovy new browser tool, always, read the T&Cs carefully (there are pages of gobbledegook) and if they refer to 3rd party software installations, you can pretty much guarantee that you are going to get a bit of software that will cause you grief in the long run.

    I have always recommended that users avoid "helper" tools.
  • Noobie_2Noobie_2 Forumite
    205 Posts
    Very good advice to read the T&C (or EULA) before downloading anything – “however, there are pages of gobbledegook” - sure can be:

    At 5,936 words, the license stretches to 63 on-screen pages as presented by the current Kazaa installer (bundling Gator).

    http://netrn.net/spywareblog/archives/2004/11/30/from-bad-to-worse-gators-eula/

    Some sites don’t actually encourage you to read the T&C (presumably because they are trying to hide something?), just to click ‘Accept’ (and get whatever crap they might want to stick on you)

    If in doubt, check it out.
  • VHVH Forumite
    501 Posts
    I get the impression SOME people think it's the 'fault' of BT (or whoever), and that they shouldn't have to pay. I've got no problem if BT (or whoever) decide that, just wondered if anyone has a different view, something along the lines of, you're responsible for the security of your pc??
    Totally agree, users should take more of an interest in their PC security.

    If you blame BT for this then you may as well blame them for anonymous phone calls, annoying telemarketers, heavy breathers etc. They only supply the phone lines after all - it is up to people what to do with them.
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