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    • clairehi
    • By clairehi 6th Jan 08, 10:04 PM
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    clairehi
    Widows entitlement to state pension
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:04 PM
    Widows entitlement to state pension 6th Jan 08 at 10:04 PM
    Hi guys

    Sadly, my father died on Christmas Day 2007 aged 63. He therefore was never able to collect his state pension althought he had a full record of contributions
    My mother is 61 and has been in receipt of a partial state pension since she was 60.

    I have received the DWP booklet "what to do when someone dies" from the hospital but it is unclear on what if anything someone in my mothers position is entitled to. when I registered the death I was given a form to complete with an envelope to return to the Pensions Agency (?) in Cardiff but have heard nothing back as yet.

    my father was under the impression that my mothers state pension would be "made up" to the full amount on his death and that she would receive 2000 Bereavement Payment, but I am not sure if this is correct. can anyone advise?


    thanks
Page 1
    • CLAPTON
    • By CLAPTON 6th Jan 08, 10:25 PM
    • 39,096 Posts
    • 27,761 Thanks
    CLAPTON
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:25 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:25 PM
    try reading

    http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/RightsAndResponsibilities/Death/WhatToDoAfterADeath/DG_066810
    • jem16
    • By jem16 6th Jan 08, 10:33 PM
    • 18,438 Posts
    • 11,209 Thanks
    jem16
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:33 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:33 PM
    my father was under the impression that my mothers state pension would be "made up" to the full amount on his death and that she would receive 2000 Bereavement Payment, but I am not sure if this is correct. can anyone advise?


    thanks
    Originally posted by clairehi
    Sorry to hear about your loss.

    It seems that your father was correct and your mother should now receive a pension based on your father's contributions. Exactly how much would depend on thos contributions and may well be the full amount. It looks likely that she is also entitled to the 2000 Bereavement Payment as he was not in receipt of his state pension when he died.

    See P77 of this guide where it explains in more detail;

    http://www.thepensionservice.gov.uk/pdf/np46/np46apr05.pdf
    • Dustykitten
    • By Dustykitten 6th Jan 08, 10:51 PM
    • 16,409 Posts
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    Dustykitten
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:51 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 08, 10:51 PM
    Hi claire I am really sorry to hear about of your Father's Passing.

    My Dad also died at 63 with my mother being 61. Mum's pension was increaed to a widows pension, she also received the 2000. I am pretty sure it was all triggered once we sent the form you mention off. With it being the holiday period I guess it may take a little longer but the back pay will be issued along with a notification of the figure from then on. Please feel free to PM me if I can be of any help as I have kept most of the paperwork involved.

    Best Wishes

    Dusty x

    The birds of sadness may fly overhead but don't let them nest in your hair
    • clairehi
    • By clairehi 8th Jan 08, 2:37 PM
    • 1,332 Posts
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    clairehi
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 08, 2:37 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 08, 2:37 PM
    thank you all. I had to refer to p 77 of the 120 page long NP46 form to confirm that my mum should get a pension increase to the value of my dad's state pension entitlement. Could they not make these things a bit clearer?

    I believe the form I received from the registrar was the BD8 Certificate of Registration of Death, which should, accordingly to NP46 act as an application for the pension increase. This is a simple 2 sided A4 form. Job done

    However in order to get the 2K bereavement payment (which will just about cover last month's gin bill....) Mum needs to complete another 20 page form, BB1, and send it to the JobCentre Plus office with original birth, marriage and death certificates. Or (rather than risk having her identity stolen by Royal Mail), she can take it in person to the local Job Centre Plus and (presumably) queue up along with all the dole claimants to be seen. Great - that should probably just about finish her off as well.
    • Elcee
    • By Elcee 12th Jan 08, 8:47 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Elcee
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 08, 8:47 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 08, 8:47 PM
    I am recently widowed aged 62 and receiving a partial state pension in my own right, my husband was 60 when he died in November 07 having a full record of contributions, I am not sure what I am entitled to and can anyone tell me to qualify for any additional pension, is it means tested?
    Last edited by Elcee; 12-01-2008 at 8:53 PM.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 12th Jan 08, 8:56 PM
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    seven-day-weekend
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 08, 8:56 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 08, 8:56 PM
    I'm sorry to hear of your bereavement Elcee.

    I think you can claim a full pension from your late husband's contributions . State Pension is not means-tested.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
  • Uluru
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 08, 10:56 PM
    Pension confusion and anxiety
    • #8
    • 7th Dec 08, 10:56 PM
    Hi - I need some advice, but it is a bit complicated and I must admit I struggle to understand the whole pension area! But here goes... Here is the background: My father died suddenly in 2002 at the age of 58. He had been paying into a private pension fund (Unilever) and a representative for the fund came to see my mother at the time (age 58) - informing her that she could claim his pension and, being in full time education at the time, I started receiving an allowance (which stopped when I finished uni in 2004). My mother reached retirement age and started to claim my father's Unilever pension and a state pension (she had worked for a proportion of her life). I seem to recall at the time the pension representative came to see my mother, she said that my mother would be entitled to both pensions. My mother has never felt comfortable with this. She thinks that she is not entitled to both and that she is receiving too much, which is causing her a great deal of anxiety. Despite assuring her everything is OK - and even contacting the DWP and Unilever on her behalf (she does not understand everything to do with the pensions and struggles on the phone) to confirm it at least twice before - she is still extremely worried that she will have to pay it back and with interest. I guess what I am wanting is some confirmation that it is possible to receive both a private and state pension and if anyone else has been in this situation? How can I assure her everything is OK? I am assuming if it wasn't - it has been brought to the DWP/Unilever's attention via query, so they would have said so? She does not accept this argument however. Help! Thanks
    • CLAPTON
    • By CLAPTON 7th Dec 08, 11:13 PM
    • 39,096 Posts
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    CLAPTON
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 08, 11:13 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Dec 08, 11:13 PM
    It's perfectly normal to receive a state pension based on her own contributions via NI and a occupational pension based on her husbands contribtions to a private (Unilever ) scheme

    Otherwise no-one would contribute to occupactional schemes.

    Does she have any friends in a similar situation that she could seek confirmation and make her feel more comfortable.
  • EdInvestor
    My mother reached retirement age and started to claim my father's Unilever pension and a state pension (she had worked for a proportion of her life).
    Originally posted by Uluru
    I suggest you contact the Pension Service to check on this.If she does not receive the full basic state pension in her own right, she may be better claiming on the basis of her late husband's contributions, as she would now, as a widow, receive 100% of his pension, plus 50% of any SERPS/S2P he was due.

    www.thepensionservice.gov.uk

    Is she paying the correct amount of tax? Both state and private pensions are taxable.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 8th Dec 08, 12:13 PM
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    margaretclare
    If you're widowed before retirement age there is usually a form of 'pension' based on late husband's contributions.

    Once you reach retirement age you have 2 options: EITHER (1) claim retirement pension based on your own contributions OR (2) claim retirement pension based on late husband's contributions, whichever is most favourable.

    This happened to me in 1992. I was widowed age 56, late husband was 58, and because he hadn't yet become eligible for retirement pension, I was paid 1000 'bereavement payment' (it's now 2000).
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • Uluru
    Thank you all for the swift responses! It is appreciated. Unfortunately she doesn't have many friends other than family (lost touch with many and think she finds it difficult to get out and make new ones). But even then she is quite uneasy about mentioning this as I think she feels that she is committing fraud of some kind - which as far as my siblings and I are concerned, cannot be the case as we have contacted the Pension Service in the past to confirm everything is OK and a representative from Unilever helped to sort everything at the very beginning!! The problem is we don't really understand the finer details of all this pension stuff and neither does she - so other than a lack of anyone telling us something is wrong when we have asked for confirmation (am I being completely niave here?), we find it difficult to substantiate an explanation that will remove her anxiety. I am trying to gather the facts to decipher the rationale behind the specific payments she receives, but I am struggling to understand it myself. One of the things she is worried about is the tax. How can we investigate this for her? Is it possible to claim a late husbands private AND state pension also? Or would this be covered by a private pension only? Thanks again.
    • jem16
    • By jem16 8th Dec 08, 8:40 PM
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    jem16
    One of the things she is worried about is the tax. How can we investigate this for her?
    Originally posted by Uluru
    Your mum is 64, possibly 65 now?

    Personal allowance for up to age 65 is 6035. From age 65 it is 9030. You will need to add your mum's state pension and her gross pension from your dad's pension company together. Anything above the personal allowance is taxed at 20%. If she is above this personal allowance she needs to get in touch with HMRC who will send her a form to complete which should detail all of her income.

    Is it possible to claim a late husbands private AND state pension also? Or would this be covered by a private pension only? Thanks again.
    Yes it is possible to claim both and you may find she gets more pension based on your dad's contributions. Contact them at the link EdInvestor gave earlier.
  • EdInvestor
    One of the things she is worried about is the tax. How can we investigate this for her?
    Originally posted by Uluru
    Does she have a tax code?Has she received any communications from HMRC? If not, contact her tax office which will be the one which serves Unilever. There is a short form which they send to people who have recently retired - it's only a couple of pages long. Ask for one of those, fill it in and return it and Mum will then be deluged with letters announcing new codings for a few months as the system sorts her out Eventuallky it will become clear. Is tax being deducted from the Unilever pension? How much is her total income?

    [quote]Is it possible to claim a late husbands private AND state pension also?-/quote]

    Yes Normally what happens is the husband's occupational pension will pay a spouse's pension to the widow.This may or may not be as much as he got - between 50% and 100% of what he got is typical.

    With the state pension, she should get 100% of his basic pension and (probably) 50% of any SERPS/S2P additional state pension he got.

    Both these pensions can be received at the same time.
    • jem16
    • By jem16 8th Dec 08, 8:51 PM
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    jem16
    and (probably) 50% of any SERPS/S2P additional state pension he got.
    Originally posted by EdInvestor
    There may not be any/much SERPS/S2P as he may have been contracted out because of his occupational pension.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 8th Dec 08, 9:37 PM
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    seven-day-weekend
    Both myself and my husband will be entitled to an Occupational Pension and a State Pension.

    It is quite usual to have more than one pension source.

    As for tax, your mum will have a personal allowance - add all her income together and if it is over her personal allowance she will have to pay tax on the excess.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 8th Dec 08, 9:42 PM
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    seven-day-weekend
    If you want a rationale - her husband has paid into the private pension, so she is entitled to receive that (the amount according to the terms of the scheme); she has paid into her State Pension so she is entitled to receive that too, the amount depending on how many qualifying years she has.

    She may also be entitled to some SERPS/S2P (additional State Pension) depending upon how much has been accrued.
    To love someone is to learn the song in their heart and to sing it to them when they have forgotten it
    'I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen. Not only because I see it, but because I see everything by it': C.S. Lewis
    St. Augustine 'In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.'
  • jancee
    Another way of putting it might be to say, 'Right. Dad worked and paid National Insurance from his wages. That entitled him [and his widow if he died] to state pension. But he also paid out extra for his Unilever pension so that he and his wife would have more to live on in retirement. So he paid for two pensions from his wages every week, which costs a lot more than just National Insurance on its own, so she is entitled to both.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 9th Dec 08, 11:09 AM
    • 9,982 Posts
    • 16,129 Thanks
    margaretclare
    Both myself and my husband will be entitled to an Occupational Pension and a State Pension.

    It is quite usual to have more than one pension source.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    Yes. Many of us have state pension and work-based, or other private, pension in addition.

    As for tax, your mum will have a personal allowance - add all her income together and if it is over her personal allowance she will have to pay tax on the excess.
    She will be better off for tax purposes when she reaches age 65, because that's when the age-related personal allowances kick in. Have a look on HMRC's site: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/pensioners/index.htm

    HTH
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • boobbby
    • By boobbby 10th Dec 08, 1:28 AM
    • 753 Posts
    • 212 Thanks
    boobbby
    I often notice that posters refer to the age related pension allowance as being available from age 65. In fact it is available from the start of the tax year after your age is 64. Best day to be born is the 4th April !!
    BB
    Last edited by boobbby; 10-12-2008 at 9:25 PM.
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