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    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 30th Sep 07, 6:18 PM
    • 25,446 Posts
    • 12,128 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #2
    • 30th Sep 07, 6:18 PM
    • #2
    • 30th Sep 07, 6:18 PM
    This has been covered many many times on this forum.

    It is not cheaper to keep the boiler on all the time. The longer your boiler is off, the lower your bill.

    Do a search on this forum or read the Energy Saving Trust.
    • simongregson
    • By simongregson 30th Sep 07, 7:37 PM
    • 807 Posts
    • 456 Thanks
    simongregson
    • #3
    • 30th Sep 07, 7:37 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Sep 07, 7:37 PM
    Think of it like, would it be cheaper to leave the kettle on all the time?

    The answer then seems obvious!
  • footprints
    • #4
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:06 PM
    • #4
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:06 PM
    Great thanks for the responce. That does seem obvious...just people we know do it! Is there anyway of finding out how much more it cost?
    • tomstickland
    • By tomstickland 1st Oct 07, 6:12 PM
    • 18,885 Posts
    • 15,427 Thanks
    tomstickland
    • #5
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:12 PM
    • #5
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:12 PM
    You'll find that some people swear blind that it saves them money. They usually say "you don't waste energy heating a cold building". If you hear this ask them if they'd leave the heating on if they went away for six months, because then they'd not have to heat up a cold house when they got back.
    Happy chappy
  • footprints
    • #6
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:24 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Oct 07, 6:24 PM
    good point..but I wonder if there are any factual ways of finding the answer out?
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 1st Oct 07, 11:11 PM
    • 25,446 Posts
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    Cardew
    • #7
    • 1st Oct 07, 11:11 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Oct 07, 11:11 PM
    The factual way of finding out the answer is to read and understand the laws of physics.

    Or ask on this forum and get people who know what they are talking about to answer.

    Or if you think the laws of physics are wrong -----
    • tomstickland
    • By tomstickland 1st Oct 07, 11:19 PM
    • 18,885 Posts
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    tomstickland
    • #8
    • 1st Oct 07, 11:19 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Oct 07, 11:19 PM
    It's pretty simple TBH. The basic rules of thermodynamics, as emperically derived and accepted as true over centuries of research are required.

    Heat flow is proportional to temperature difference between the heat source and the sink.

    The rate of heat flow from the building is proportional to the temperature difference between it and the outside. If over a day the building is left to cool then the total amount of heat released into the outside world will be less than if the building is kept at an elevated temperature.

    The total amount of heat lost per day will be proportional the summation of the time multiplied by temperature difference.

    Turning the heating off when out will allow the house to cool and this will
    Happy chappy
  • footprints
    • #9
    • 2nd Oct 07, 1:58 PM
    • #9
    • 2nd Oct 07, 1:58 PM
    Thanks..umm I dont think I understood all of that..

    So should I let it re heat twice a day or keep it on all day?
  • itsnotfair
    Never mind *footprints* some people just think they know everything. lol.
    I'm with the leave it on low all the time brigade.
  • espresso
    Never mind *footprints* some people just think they know everything. lol.
    I'm with the leave it on low all the time brigade.
    Originally posted by itsnotfair
    What's low and how high are your bills?
    Blue text on this forum usually signifies hyperlinks, so click on them!..
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 2nd Oct 07, 4:08 PM
    • 25,446 Posts
    • 12,128 Thanks
    Cardew
    Never mind *footprints* some people just think they know everything. lol.
    I'm with the leave it on low all the time brigade.
    Originally posted by itsnotfair
    Could that be because we have a rudimentary knowledge of the law of thermodynamics?

    Why “never mind”? The OP asked a question and got the correct answer from several people – until your contribution of course!

    Presumably it offends you that the OP is given the correct advice and won’t be following your practice?

    Or perhaps you could back your advice with some sort of evidence.

    Below is a extract from the FAQ on the Energy Saving Trust website – a Government backed organisation set up to advise on these matters – admittedly they probably think they ‘know it all’.

    Perhaps you could explain why they are wrong. Could it be that a man in the pub told you?
    Question

    Is it more economical to leave my heating on 24hrs in the winter?



    Answer

    No. It is a common misconception that it is cheaper to leave your hot water and heating on all the time. Boilers use more power initially to heat water from cold, however the cost of this is greatly exceeded by the cost of keeping the boiler running all of the time.
    The best solution is to programme your heating system so that it comes on when you need it most (possibly early morning and in the evening), and goes off when you don't need it (when you are out of the house or asleep). There are a range of controls that can be used and your heating engineer will be able to provide you with the most appropriate solution.
    Depending on your circumstances it may be necessary to keep the heating on all day during winter but it will cost more than if you turn the heating off when you don't need it.

    Last edited by Cardew; 02-10-2007 at 5:30 PM.
  • footprints
    Thank-you Cardew for researching that for me..I think I have my answer now!!

    But some people need to "chill out" abit and not get so stressed out! We aint all know it all's..we gotta learn from somewhere!

    Anyway..I will be having a nice warm house this winter! Thanks!
  • paulalawson
    I take it this goes for heating water too, i was always told it was cheaper to have it on all the time, heating and water, TYPICAL no wonder my bills are so high.
    would be great to know
    • tomstickland
    • By tomstickland 12th Oct 07, 6:04 PM
    • 18,885 Posts
    • 15,427 Thanks
    tomstickland
    Never mind *footprints* some people just think they know everything. lol.
    I'm with the leave it on low all the time brigade.
    Originally posted by itsnotfair
    I don't really understand what you're trying to achieve here. I certainly don't think I "know it all", but thermodynamics is a subject I know a fair bit about.

    There's no doubt that the total amount of heat flowing out from a house in a day will be higher if the house is kept warm all day compared with allowing it to cool for a couple of hours and then heating it back up.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 12th Oct 07, 6:24 PM
    • 25,446 Posts
    • 12,128 Thanks
    Cardew
    I take it this goes for heating water too, i was always told it was cheaper to have it on all the time, heating and water, TYPICAL no wonder my bills are so high.
    would be great to know
    Originally posted by paulalawson
    It applies for heating water as well - see the quote from the Energy saving trust in my earlier post.

    As has been said many times, would you leave your kettle boiling all day as it is supposed to cost more to heat it up from cold?
    That is the same principle; albeit the heat loss from a well lagged tank will not be high.
  • paulalawson
    thankyou cardew,after being miss informed for over 8 years or even more, and having my water on constant i have changed my hot water to twice daily on the timer. we only have a small tank so hope we get enough hot water for what we need. i have put it on timer for 3 hours morning and again evening.i haven't put my heating on twice daily though, cause i am at home all day, and i dont like the temperature to drop below 18 degrees. too cold for me.I like it to come on at 20 degrees if needed in the dayand i turn it down to 18 at bed time. thanks again
    Last edited by paulalawson; 12-10-2007 at 10:05 PM.
  • espresso
    thankyou cardew,after being miss informed for over 8 years or even more, and having my water on constant i have changed my hot water to twice daily on the timer. we only have a small tank so hope we get enough hot water for what we need. i have put it on timer for 3 hours morning and again evening.i haven't put my heating on twice daily though, cause i am at home all day, and i dont like the temperature to drop below 18 degrees. too cold for me.I like it to come on at 20 degrees if needed in the dayand i turn it down to 18 at bed time. thanks again
    Originally posted by paulalawson
    You should not need it on for three hours morning and night. If you have a gas boiler, use that to heat your hot water all year round, as it is much cheaper than using electricity. A gas boiler can heat a tank full in half an hour if timed for morning an evening.
    Blue text on this forum usually signifies hyperlinks, so click on them!..
  • paulalawson
    ok so we have a combination boiler, so half hour am and pm should be enough?
  • espresso
    ok so we have a combination boiler, so half hour am and pm should be enough?
    Originally posted by paulalawson
    Yes, if set for half an hour, it should heat up a tank full in less than that time.
    Blue text on this forum usually signifies hyperlinks, so click on them!..
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