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  • FIRST POST
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 3rd Apr 07, 8:02 AM
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    Phirefly
    How does Expired MOT affect insurance claim?
    • #1
    • 3rd Apr 07, 8:02 AM
    How does Expired MOT affect insurance claim? 3rd Apr 07 at 8:02 AM
    Hi, I've searched the threads where this issue has been discussed previously, sorry if I'm repeating but I'm just looking for confirmation on a point raised.

    I had a minor at fault bump resulting in almost 1.5K of repairs to my car the DAY after my MOT expired without me realising (hows your luck ) I was oblivious and the claim was set in motion. Now I've realised my mistake I'm in a dilemma over whether to tell my insurers about this or if its not worth it. The car is booked in to be repaired in a couple of weeks and thus far all I've been told by the insurers is that I will need to pay my £150 excess diectly to the bodyshop.

    I've seen it stated on this forum that for minor reparable claims, insurance companies do not require you to produce a valid MOT certificate. Is this a fact?

    Many thanks in advance
    Last edited by Phirefly; 03-04-2007 at 10:19 AM.
Page 1
    • FlameCloud
    • By FlameCloud 3rd Apr 07, 8:18 AM
    • 1,744 Posts
    • 802 Thanks
    FlameCloud
    • #2
    • 3rd Apr 07, 8:18 AM
    • #2
    • 3rd Apr 07, 8:18 AM
    By allowing the MOT to lapse (and subsequently the Tax as well I think) you have clearly breached page 20 section 3 of the policy- keeping the vehicle in a roadworthy condition.

    If the insurance company find out its an probable repudiation, and don't be fooled into thinking that we need you to produce a physical certificate to be caught out by it.

    Its a connundrum about whether to keep quiet about it, but it is down to your own morals I suppose.
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 3rd Apr 07, 10:07 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
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    Phirefly
    • #3
    • 3rd Apr 07, 10:07 AM
    • #3
    • 3rd Apr 07, 10:07 AM
    Thanks for your reply.

    Its completely alien to me to be in this position. At university I used to preach to my friends who falsely insured their cars from their parents' address and I have had a claim investigated in the past so I know how important it is to be as up front with insurers as possible.

    From my research into this it seems that this whole issue is somewhat of a grey area. The consensus on this board seems to be that if the car is repairable the you wont be required to produce an MOT certificate to the insurers. Anecdotal evidence I've found confirms this and also that it is rare for insurers to check on MOTs in straightforward cases.

    On the Times Online, its stated that
    It is a Myth that If your car has no MoT or road tax then your insurance is invalid
    and that
    There are a very few policies that insist in the small print that an MoT must be in force otherwise they will refuse to pay. These, however, are extremely rare, but it is worth checking the wording just in case.
    I do not want to deliberately mislead, but I also don't want to open an unnecessary can of worms....
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 3rd Apr 07, 10:16 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
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    Phirefly
    • #4
    • 3rd Apr 07, 10:16 AM
    • #4
    • 3rd Apr 07, 10:16 AM
    Also, I've read that as the MOT is no guarantee of roadworthiness, it isn't strictly relevant to the clause you made reference to. It appears that the 'roadworthiness' issue is dealt with on a case by case basis, and whether any defect was causatory.

    The accident occured under 20mph when I backended someone who performed an emergency stop as we were moving away at the green light. I would think that the only vehicular roadworthiness issue relevant to this particular incident would be my brakes and possibly tyres. As it happens my brakes were serviced and tyres checked a few days prior to the incident....
  • mattymoo
    • #5
    • 3rd Apr 07, 11:05 AM
    • #5
    • 3rd Apr 07, 11:05 AM
    Phirefly, your 2nd post (3rd on thread) is pretty much spot on.

    Not quite sure what Flamecloud is getting at quoting section this, page that of a policy document. Whose policy document? You never said who the insurers were. Suspect he is quoting his own companies policy.

    MOT certs are inspected when the car is a write off. No MOT will result in a lower valuation. It does not, as you say, invalidate your insurance. MOT only proves a car is roadworthy on the day of the MOT test.

    Your insurers will have got their motor engineer to inspect the car and agree the repair costs with the bodyshop. If he had any concerns about its condition, he would have raised them then.

    Do not volunteer the MOT information. Get the car repaired and then arrange an MOT test for the day you collect it from the bodyshop. You must then drive from bodyshop to MOT testing station - the only journey you can legally make without an MOT.

    Oh, and don't book MOT with a garage in the same chain as the bodyshop. That would be just daft
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 3rd Apr 07, 11:11 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
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    Phirefly
    • #6
    • 3rd Apr 07, 11:11 AM
    • #6
    • 3rd Apr 07, 11:11 AM


    You're a Legend, thanks a million for the reassurance.

    I had stated my insurers in my first post so thats probably why the other poster had made reference to a particular clause. I thought better of it though and edited the name of my insurers out.
    • nadnad
    • By nadnad 4th Apr 07, 10:49 AM
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    nadnad
    • #7
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:49 AM
    • #7
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:49 AM
    yep just to reassure you - your insurance company will only ask for the MOT and reg book if the vehicle is written off. get it fixed get it MOTd and say nothing!
    DON'T WORRY BE HAPPY

    norn iron club member no.1
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 4th Apr 07, 10:56 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
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    Phirefly
    • #8
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:56 AM
    • #8
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:56 AM
    Thanks nadnad, its very reassuring to hear that. I'm not a fraud and try to lead a moral life, I just wanted to double check whether I would have been disclosing something I needn't have. I just want the whole matter over with now!
  • milkydrink
    • #9
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:57 AM
    • #9
    • 4th Apr 07, 10:57 AM
    Not trying to scare you.

    BUT aren't MOT's on a computer database now anyway.

    If you do your car tax online you don't need to show your MOT they just know you are listed as having a valid one.

    The yaba-daba-do thing the police have, that knows automatically if a car is legit by number plate recogniction.

    My insurance company is one who says you must have an MOT to be insured. I would have thought without a MOT you are not road legal & if you are not legal why would they pay out:confused: .
    • nadnad
    • By nadnad 4th Apr 07, 11:36 AM
    • 1,561 Posts
    • 1,394 Thanks
    nadnad
    they will pay out because they dont check. they trust that their custmoers will have tax and mot.
    DON'T WORRY BE HAPPY

    norn iron club member no.1
    • Phirefly
    • By Phirefly 8th May 07, 11:50 AM
    • 1,510 Posts
    • 1,843 Thanks
    Phirefly
    Thought I'd update this thread as when I was looking for info on the subject, I found plenty of opinions but no facts regarding what actually happened in the end to people in this situation.

    Well I got my car MOTd immediately, then repaired at a main dealer, paid my £150 excess and got my car back last thursday no questions asked
  • kwizzy
    At fault crash with lapsed MOT but current tax & insurance
    Does anyone know what is likely to happen insurance-wise with a car which is a write-off following an accident? The car was roadworthy but my elderly friend had just lost track of the MOT date because of problems at home with sick husband. The crash was driver error (admitted) and my friend will not drive again now but is afraid that she will be sued for all her worldly goods. The insurance company is Saga (they have just asked for car docs including MOT and don't know yet) and we don't know how to respond.
    Any info or advice gratefully received.
  • mattymoo
    If the vehicle is written off she will get a lower value for the car, typically the trade in value you would expect from a dealer. The insurer's motor engineer will check the car for roadworthiness. Only issue you might have is if there is a defect on the car that would have been picked up by the MOT, that contributed directly to the accident. For example, failed brake components.
    • Horace
    • By Horace 6th Nov 07, 4:37 PM
    • 14,129 Posts
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    Horace
    If the car has no valid MOT then it invalidates any insurance she may have. It is the car owners responsibility to ensure that the car has a valid MOT and to say that your elderly friend lost track because of a sick husband is no excuse.

    No MOT means no insurance.
    Semper in faeces profundum variat

    Make £5 a day challenge Oct 2014 £126.00/£155
    Make £5 a day challenge Nov 2014 £157.40/£150
    Make £10 a day challenge Dec 2014 £392.90/£310
  • mattymoo
    Horace, go back and read the thread again. Lack of MOT does not invalidate insurance.
    • Horace
    • By Horace 6th Nov 07, 4:45 PM
    • 14,129 Posts
    • 24,783 Thanks
    Horace
    Horace, go back and read the thread again. Lack of MOT does not invalidate insurance.
    Originally posted by mattymoo
    Mattymoo - my partner was caught with no MOT - he had forgotten to get it renewed and was actually nobbled by the Police because they had done a check on their computer and he was done for having no MOT and no insurance (despite him having fully comprehensive car insurance that was up to date).

    I offered an opinion that is all... I thought that was what this forum was about but hey if not, I shall go elsewhere and not proffer advice on here again.
    Semper in faeces profundum variat

    Make £5 a day challenge Oct 2014 £126.00/£155
    Make £5 a day challenge Nov 2014 £157.40/£150
    Make £10 a day challenge Dec 2014 £392.90/£310
  • mattymoo
    Sorry Horace. Did they say why it resulted in no insurance? Although both are vehicle related the absence of an MOT should not automatically invalidate insurance.
    MOT only proves car is roadworthy on day of test.
    • vikingaero
    • By vikingaero 6th Nov 07, 6:34 PM
    • 10,157 Posts
    • 12,803 Thanks
    vikingaero
    Mattymoo - my partner was caught with no MOT - he had forgotten to get it renewed and was actually nobbled by the Police because they had done a check on their computer and he was done for having no MOT and no insurance (despite him having fully comprehensive car insurance that was up to date).

    I offered an opinion that is all... I thought that was what this forum was about but hey if not, I shall go elsewhere and not proffer advice on here again.
    Originally posted by Horace
    Horace,

    The difference was the your Partner was caught by the Police with no MOT. The OP simply forgot to renew the MOT by a day and hasn't been caught by any official. They could simply renew the MOT and if asked to present it they could present a new certificate. Most insurers would presume that the MOT ran concurrently with the expired MOT.
    • peter999
    • By peter999 6th Nov 07, 7:54 PM
    • 6,944 Posts
    • 2,926 Thanks
    peter999
    By allowing the MOT to lapse (and subsequently the Tax as well I think) you have clearly breached page 20 section 3 of the policy- keeping the vehicle in a roadworthy condition
    Originally posted by FlameCloud
    If the car has no valid MOT then it invalidates any insurance she may have. It is the car owners responsibility to ensure that the car has a valid MOT and to say that your elderly friend lost track because of a sick husband is no excuse.

    No MOT means no insurance.
    Originally posted by Horace
    Utter codswallop.

    peter999
    • vikingaero
    • By vikingaero 6th Nov 07, 8:37 PM
    • 10,157 Posts
    • 12,803 Thanks
    vikingaero
    Not having an MOT is an offence but IIRC is isn't an endorsable offence.
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