Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Dukes_of_hazard
    • By Dukes_of_hazard 3rd Nov 06, 3:01 PM
    • 85Posts
    • 10Thanks
    Dukes_of_hazard
    Cost Per Litre
    • #1
    • 3rd Nov 06, 3:01 PM
    Cost Per Litre 3rd Nov 06 at 3:01 PM
    Can anyone tell me roughly how much water costs per litre. I want to try and visualize the savings I could be making by flushing my loo fewer times and by
    turning off the tap when brushing my teath etc...

    Cheers
    Easy Money
Page 1
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 3rd Nov 06, 5:13 PM
    • 26,334 Posts
    • 12,667 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #2
    • 3rd Nov 06, 5:13 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Nov 06, 5:13 PM
    Water charges vary greatly across the country.

    Some have high standing charges and lower water/sewerage charges and others low standing charges and higher water/sewerage charges.

    I live in the Severn Trent area which has low standing charges and pay 108.77p per cubic metre for water and 77.23p per cubic metre for sewerage.

    So as a cubic metre is 1,000 litres I pay 0.108p per litre for water and the combined figure is 0.184p per liter - i.e. 5 litres costs just less than 1 pence.
    • Dukes_of_hazard
    • By Dukes_of_hazard 4th Nov 06, 12:29 AM
    • 85 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Dukes_of_hazard
    • #3
    • 4th Nov 06, 12:29 AM
    thanks
    • #3
    • 4th Nov 06, 12:29 AM
    Thanks for info. Blimey I really need to think of other ways of saving money !! It could take me a while this way !!

    Cheers
    Easy Money
  • silvergirl
    • #4
    • 20th Feb 08, 7:53 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Feb 08, 7:53 AM
    Mmm yes, but the issue may be how long does one run the tap? When I checked (yes sad I know) I ran 4 litres in 10 seconds. So if it's say 15 seconds average to run 5 litres, that's 20 litres a minute. Whilst maybe not a lot of pence (although we all know about pence and pounds taking care of selves) running the water whilst brushing teeth properly for example is maybe a bit of a habit and may not be necessary. (I only wish our local water was drinkable. It's like swallowing a swimming pool.)
  • CrashUK
    • #5
    • 28th May 09, 12:21 AM
    • #5
    • 28th May 09, 12:21 AM
    No I think they are real saving to be made. Try out interflush, Tapmagic,

    Interflush is for thr toilet saves 20% water per year so save about £100 off a £500 water bill
    Cost is about £15-20 per toilet - http://www.interflush.co.uk/

    Tapmagic is for your taps. Saves about 4% water per year so saves about £20 off a £500 water bill.
    Cost is about £5 per tap. - http://www.tapmagic.co.uk/

    Low-Flow Showerhead- Most showers use around 18 litres per min Water Saving Show Heads use about 8 litres per min so the saving 50% on water and energy.. Cost is about £15-50 Note. Dont work on electric showers.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 28th May 09, 1:22 PM
    • 26,334 Posts
    • 12,667 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #6
    • 28th May 09, 1:22 PM
    • #6
    • 28th May 09, 1:22 PM
    No I think they are real saving to be made. Try out interflush, Tapmagic,

    Interflush is for thr toilet saves 20% water per year so save about £100 off a £500 water bill
    Cost is about £15-20 per toilet - http://www.interflush.co.uk/

    .
    Originally posted by CrashUK
    There are savings to be made if you have one of the old toilets. Of 45 million toilets in UK about 7 million are the old 13 litre type.

    http://www.waterwise.org.uk/reducing_water_wastage_in_the_uk/house_and_garden/toilet_flushing_at_home.html

    However for the majority have much smaller capacity.

    Even if you had a 13 litre toilet and saved the claimed 6 litres every time, you would save say 1p to 1.5p a flush. With older toilets due to their design you often need a full flush to get rid of solids.

    On modern toilets your savings are minimal.

    Not the best internet advert I have seen!!!!!
  • CrashUK
    • #7
    • 28th May 09, 6:39 PM
    • #7
    • 28th May 09, 6:39 PM
    There are savings to be made if you have one of the old toilets. Of 45 million toilets in UK about 7 million are the old 13 litre type.

    http://www.waterwise.org.uk/reducing_water_wastage_in_the_uk/house_and_garden/toilet_flushing_at_home.html

    However for the majority have much smaller capacity.

    Even if you had a 13 litre toilet and saved the claimed 6 litres every time, you would save say 1p to 1.5p a flush. With older toilets due to their design you often need a full flush to get rid of solids.

    On modern toilets your savings are minimal.

    Not the best internet advert I have seen!!!!!
    Originally posted by Cardew
    Its not a cistern displacement device that save x number of litres per flush. it stops the water as soon as you take your hand off handle.

    cistern displacement device dont work that well as you can never do a full flush.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 28th May 09, 7:55 PM
    • 26,334 Posts
    • 12,667 Thanks
    Cardew
    • #8
    • 28th May 09, 7:55 PM
    • #8
    • 28th May 09, 7:55 PM
    Its not a cistern displacement device that save x number of litres per flush. it stops the water as soon as you take your hand off handle.

    cistern displacement device dont work that well as you can never do a full flush.
    Originally posted by CrashUK
    No I appreciate that it is not something like a 'hippo'- I have read the website.

    I am just disputing how much it will save, not the principle of saving water by using the device.
  • CrashUK
    • #9
    • 29th May 09, 12:11 AM
    • #9
    • 29th May 09, 12:11 AM
    No I appreciate that it is not something like a 'hippo'- I have read the website.

    I am just disputing how much it will save, not the principle of saving water by using the device.
    Originally posted by Cardew
    I am very happy with it. I did not know the number of people with this type of old toilets was so low. I dont know any one with the new modern toilets.. maybe most of the modern toilets are business.

    I am installing every thing in my house to save money when the pay back is less then one year or less. I look in to solar hot water and solar power and wind power on the side of the house but the pay back is 15-20 year
    • tomstickland
    • By tomstickland 29th May 09, 12:16 AM
    • 18,890 Posts
    • 15,427 Thanks
    tomstickland
    A washing machine uses loads of water, so the cost per litre isn't insignifcant.

    I was pretty horrified to realise that I was using around 60L per day in a flat on my own.
    Happy chappy
  • Sir Alan
    Every little helps
    I laid a 500ml plastic drink bottle in the floor of the cistern. Just removed the label and filled to the brim with cold water. I didn't bother to work out how much it will save, but it cost nothing and it is a tiny saving every flush. Makes no difference to the effectiveness. I might try standing a couple of 250ml bottles in a corner, saving 1 litre per flush in all.

    Before I had a meter I had replaced my manky old taps with lever types; this makes it a doddle to turn the water on and off briefly while cleaning my teeth, and must have saved a fortune already in the two years since the meter was installed.

    My downstairs neighbour asked for a meter at the same time but it was not possible, as the pipe feeds my supply; she did get a compensatory reduction in her annual bill, but it's still rather higher than mine.
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 18th Mar 11, 1:34 PM
    • 20,606 Posts
    • 17,209 Thanks
    HappyMJ
    I laid a 500ml plastic drink bottle in the floor of the cistern. Just removed the label and filled to the brim with cold water. I didn't bother to work out how much it will save, but it cost nothing and it is a tiny saving every flush. Makes no difference to the effectiveness. I might try standing a couple of 250ml bottles in a corner, saving 1 litre per flush in all.

    Before I had a meter I had replaced my manky old taps with lever types; this makes it a doddle to turn the water on and off briefly while cleaning my teeth, and must have saved a fortune already in the two years since the meter was installed.

    My downstairs neighbour asked for a meter at the same time but it was not possible, as the pipe feeds my supply; she did get a compensatory reduction in her annual bill, but it's still rather higher than mine.
    Originally posted by Sir Alan
    You'll be saving (if in my area) about a tenth of a penny per flush for a half litre saving. If you and your family flushed on average 10 times a day though it would save you £3.30 per year.

    I've just figured out my cost per litre. I use 26 cubic metres in a year (no outside usage) @ £1.8098 per cubic metre totalling £47.06 plus £98.38 per year standing charges for a total bill of £145.44 divided out over 26,000 litres means each litre costs me 0.56p/litre.
    • Ken68
    • By Ken68 19th Mar 11, 9:26 AM
    • 6,160 Posts
    • 3,885 Thanks
    Ken68
    Drawn water also incurs a sewerage charge.
    My bill last year was £24. This includes mains water for shower, laundry and cooking and rainwater for everything else.
    Not for everyone but worth a go.
    The £350 p.a. saving pays for the house insurance, broadband and boiler servicing.
  • Look again
    I’m afraid CrashUK has fallen for Interflush’s misleading statement – “Reduce water bills by 20-40%”

    It might be fair to say “Reduce toilet water usage by 20-40%” but that’s a completely different saving
    Baring in mind that we also use water for showers, washing up, watering the garden, washing the car, cooking etc I doubt if water used in the loo accounts for much more than 20% of the total water used
    20% of 20% is only 4% so Interflush should be reported to the advertising agency for gross misrepresentation

    Sir Alan’s idea would save you wasting £25 from the con company or just do what people have been doing for years, put a brick in the cistern
  • The Leveller
    Cost Per Litre
    'Look Agian' should indeed look again. I have just had a look at the interflush site and number one fact in the 'facts' heading was

    ''Toilet flushing is the single largest user of household water, 30-40%, up to 90% for offices.
    (The Interflush™ can save 47% of this).''

    47% of 40 is 18.8, not far off the 20% claimed, just 1.2% short, for households

    47% of 90 is 42.3, 2.3% MORE than the 40% claimed, for offices.

    I suppose the high water use for toilet flushing in offices is because they dont have baths, showers or washing machines etc.

    I have had interflush kits fitted for a few years now and they have saved me literally tons of water. I really cannot see the problem with some people, it's not rocket science. Just hold the handle down till the waste has gone, then let go to stop the flow. The waste is variable so make the flush variable. How can anyone have a problem with that.
  • Look again
    I’m puzzled why The Leveller didn’t comment on my point about Interflush’s misleading statement – “Reduce water bills by 20-40%”
    This is boldly printed across the top of their home page which can’t be missed although they do contradict themselves on a tucked away page which CrashUK and many others may not have read

    Toilet flushing is the single largest user of household water, 30-40%, up to 90% for offices.
    (The Interflush™ can save 47% of this).


    The leveller breaks down what 47% of 40% is but doesn’t bother to break down the more realistic figure of 47% of 30%
    As 47% of 30% is less than 15% Interflush’s claim of saving 20%+ has been exaggerated by over 1/3rd

    “up to 90% for offices” is a pointless claim unless you’re talking about the perhaps 2 offices in the whole country where nobody washes their hands after using the loo, don’t water the plants, wash the floor, drink tea or wash up.
    If they don’t drink tea/coffee then they won’t use the loo much so the water saving wouldn’t be worth mentioning

    Why would someone try to justify their point by using the figures quoted by a company who are trying to sell a product when there are plenty of independent results available?
    Waterwise is one of them
    Sorry I can't post a link to the facts but this site doesn't allow newbies t post links

    “Toilets use about 30% of the total water used in a household. An old style single flush toilet can use up to 13 litres of water in one flush. New, more water-efficient dual-flush toilets use only six litres for a full flush and four litres with a reduced flush.”

    The Leveller makes it sound so simple - “Just hold the handle down till the waste has gone, then let go to stop the flow.”
    Sorry I though all the waste had gone but the water splashing about hid some of the waste
    Should I flush it again?
    Dam! Now no water has been saved. I wish I’d just used a brick then I wouldn’t have to study what I’m leaving behind

    “The worst UK drought in 50 years is predicted for 2006.”
    When did Interflush make this statement? It must have been at least 5 years ago
    Since then we’ve had 2006 and the south east was worst effected according to groundwateruk
    It was their worst for 30 years but Interflush prefer not to update their figures as the UK for 50 years sounds more dramatic

    “I have had interflush kits fitted for a few years now and they have saved me literally tons of water”
    Well as you have lots of it spouting out you’ll need a lot of water to flush it all away
    Even if you saved just 5% of your water bill, in your case this would be a substantial saving

    By the way, does Interflush give you a good staff discount?
  • cheeseandpeas
    I love Jesus and think that any water saved should be used to baptise people. Woohoo!!
  • mimi007
    I have to choose between 2 houses. One is 8 Bedrooms each with ensuite and large garden that will need water for the grass and flowers, lets call it house1.
    The other one is 6 bedrooms with 3 ensuite and a garden as well with Apple trees, grass lets call it House2.

    If I was to run the house as a b&b which house will be more beneficiale to me. I will only be using between 3 to 5 rooms and the rest will be my private space.

    House1 is water metre
    House2 isn't.

    I am thinking flushing the loo, washing machine every day, costumers having long showers....

    I saw on the comment above that someone pays 0.56p per litre? thats a lot. One bath is around 225L so lets say 3 rooms with couples makes it 6 people having a shower everyday
    I have a shower everyday aswell as my husband. We both have a bath once a week as a treat.

    Please anyone who is good in maths or understand what I am trying to say could you please give some advice.
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 13th Oct 11, 8:12 AM
    • 26,334 Posts
    • 12,667 Thanks
    Cardew
    I have to choose between 2 houses. One is 8 Bedrooms each with ensuite and large garden that will need water for the grass and flowers, lets call it house1.
    The other one is 6 bedrooms with 3 ensuite and a garden as well with Apple trees, grass lets call it House2.

    If I was to run the house as a b&b which house will be more beneficiale to me. I will only be using between 3 to 5 rooms and the rest will be my private space.

    House1 is water metre
    House2 isn't.

    I am thinking flushing the loo, washing machine every day, costumers having long showers....

    I saw on the comment above that someone pays 0.56p per litre? thats a lot. One bath is around 225L so lets say 3 rooms with couples makes it 6 people having a shower everyday
    I have a shower everyday aswell as my husband. We both have a bath once a week as a treat.

    Please anyone who is good in maths or understand what I am trying to say could you please give some advice.
    Originally posted by mimi007
    The 0.56p per litre figure given above is unrepresentative in that it was for very low consumption and high standing charges. Had the occupant used 1 litre in a year the cost would have been £98 a litre


    Charges are dependant on where you live in UK but for most people are between 0.2p and 0.3p a litre.


    The question you ask is just not answerable without knowing the Rateable Value(RV) of 'house 2'.

    It is also pertinent to add that the Water company should insist that a meter is fitted to House 2 on change of occupant, although some companies don't bother enforcing that regulation.

    Also the fact that you will be using the house as a commercial premises could affect charges.
  • Gothicfairy
    If you live in the Midlands you will have to have a meter fitted anyway as it becomes a commercial property. Truth is you should have a meter for a B&B no matter where you live and all water companies can force one on you so it all depends on how long you get away with it for.
    Also you need to remember to add all charges into your room rate anyway so the bills should all be covered no matter what the rate (ie meter or RV)

    You also need to remember the standing charges and the SWD
    There is a race of men that don't fit in; A race that can't stand still;
    So they break the hearts of kith and kin, and roam the world at will.

    Robert Service
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

139Posts Today

1,431Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Good morning & goodbye. Now my series is over, I'm going to take a week off work & twitter to spend time with Mrs & mini MSE. Ta ta for now

  • RT @JulieGriff4: £2800 paid into my bank thanks to @MartinSLewis advice about packaged accounts. Unexpected and welcome. Great advice ????

  • RT @justwanna: Listened to an hour's worth of @MartinSLewis podcasts. Now have a pathological need to save some money!

  • Follow Martin