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Peel-Away or Kling-Strip - which is better
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# 1
F t P
Old 15-05-2006, 2:32 PM
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Default Peel-Away or Kling-Strip - which is better

Has anyone used either of these poultice type paint removers?

I understand that this is the best way to get paint off bannisters and architraves etc but which brand is best?

Kling-Strip has been made for longer I think.....

There are two types of Peel-Away; numbered 1 and 7. If you know these, which should be used for the above paint removal?

Thanks

Laura
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# 2
monkey writer
Old 27-09-2006, 9:43 PM
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hello, I would also be interested to know this.

I need to strip some gloss paint from lime paster.

And also some enamel paint covered with gloss paint from some aluminium.
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# 3
flang
Old 28-09-2006, 6:53 PM
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good old fashioned heat guy always does the trick
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# 4
mintyfresh
Old 05-10-2006, 2:14 PM
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these products are useless. I tried several types to strip a ceiling cornice and ended up with a real mess. They claim to strip multiple layers of paint (up to 20) at a time but I found they struggled with 1. maybe they would work on large flat surfaces, but anything with detail is a no-go. You simply cant get the removal paper into the fine detail !

I spent nearly 150 and lots of time on a small hall and small room !!! wished I'd never had started in the end
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# 5
Mike G
Old 10-01-2007, 1:14 PM
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Default Peel Away or Kling Strip? Both are brilliant

Sorry to be joining this discussion rather belatedly!

I've needed to strip large areas of Victorian paint from skirtings, stairs, spindles, ceiling roses and ornate plaster cornices and since discovering Peel Away and then Kling Strip (a cheaper version, based on the same principle), my life has been made significantly easier!

It's important to cover the application properly and leave for a minimum of 24 hours before attempting to peel off the backing paper. While it's true that neither product removes every last spec of paint in a single application, they leave the residue on the cornice paintwork in a softened state which then enables me to pick out the remaining paint with a minimum of fuss. Similarly, any remaining paint on wooden surfaces can be removed easily with a second application (or a wipe-down with caustic soda if you're prepared to take the necessary precautions when handling the stuff!)

You also will need to neutralise the surfaces once they've been fully stripped (using either a proprietary neutraliser or your own solution of white vinegar) to ensure that any subsequent paint or varnish takes properly.

But overall, I can't recommend these products highly enough, provided you follow their instructions carefully and don't try to rush the job.
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# 6
crispyduck
Old 16-04-2008, 11:39 AM
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Hi thread


I've used PA 7 on soft stone flat and carved, and found it pretty damn good, I think it takes a bit of work to get it off once it's done it's magic as I found even on flat I needed to leave it longer than the instructions said.

http://www.decoratingdirect.co.uk/viewprod/p/PALPA7/

http://www.decoratingdirect.co.uk/viewprod/p/PALPA1/

I now need quite a bit and was wondering if any of you peeps have found a really good cheap source??

Sorry to come in quite late to the discussion

Cheers

C
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# 7
sarah_elton
Old 16-04-2008, 2:00 PM
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When I moved into my flat, the numpty who had painted the hall previously had managed to get paint all over the back of the front door.

I used this stuff:

http://www.makingdiyeasier.co.uk/nit...vremovers.html

(the green tin)

It worked great. As others have said with regard to other products, follow all the instructions as the process is a little convoluted. But it got 99% of the paint off without damaging the surface of the door.

It is highly toxic and the instructions said to only use it outside, but I wasn't going to take my front door off and carry it down so I used it inside - keeping all windows open during and for several hours afterwards, and had no problem at all.

Picked it up from B&Q if I remember rightly, probably for under 20 quid and still got most of the tin left. It was a couple of years ago so not sure who stocks it now.
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# 8
comingupforblair
Old 03-12-2008, 11:32 AM
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I have used Kling strip - it's very effective. I recently used porridge to remove paint. I'm not mad and it does work on coving (make up porridge stick it to area and cover in clingfilm) but I found the weight of the porridge meant that some of it fell down. If you can get the porridge to stay up there it's highly reccomended and very cheap!
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# 9
Jahz
Old 24-04-2009, 12:53 AM
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Yes, I've used porridge and it's very effective. If you 'cook' it to the correct consistency it sticks to anything! I use the 'value' brand of supermarket porridge oats and heat it in a pan with just enough water to make a thick gruel. (It shouldn't flow). This takes less than a minute (unless you also want to eat it, in which case cook as directed!) It's not really necessary to use warm porridge but I feel it's more likely to act better on the paint. But anyway, you'll find that if the porridge is thick enough it will easily stick to the plaster. Once you've spread it over the plaster (use a wooden or plastic spatula - a metal item can easily damage the cornice), cover it with cut-open carrier bags to retain the moisture and leave it for 2 or 3 days then pick it off. Much of it will come away with the porridge but you'll have to scrape off the remaining softened paint, but that shouldn't be a problem.
I wouldn't leave it on much longer though as mould can develop with a corresponding pong.
I'm assuming the paint to be removed is water-based (emulsion etc). I don't imagine it would be very good on oil-based paint (gloss etc). But would be interested to hear of anyone else's experience.
So.....
It's safe
It's 'green'
It's effective
It's CHEAP!
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# 10
TheGardener
Old 16-08-2009, 2:58 PM
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Thumbs up PorridgePaint stripper

Like Jahz, I tried the porridge method - with a lot of cornicing to tackle, the Peel Away 7 product was simply way too expensive for my meagre budget and I have to say I was astounded to find porridge really does work! A bit of experimenting with consistency and the tools I used to remove it and we got it sussed. Supermarket value porridge oats, own brand swing bin liners (gosamer thin) and an assortment of wooden manicure sticks, old credit card and a kitchen palet knife, this job cost me less then a tenner rather than over 100. To top all that it was as eco friendly as you can get! No chemicals to neutralise (or for the dogs and kids to get at) and very kind to my skin!! A total winner for me.
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# 11
Stina
Old 18-05-2011, 1:27 PM
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Default what paint to use?

Hi,

I found the porridge option to work well for me after reading your posts. Thanks!

Now to my question: What paint should I use to repaint the stripped cornicing? It is very detailed Victorian cornicing and I don't want it to clog up, that would make all the work stripping it pointless...

Emulsion paint? Does it need to be watered down and layered? Without paint it is beige and I want to paint it white.

Thankful for advice!!
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# 12
danperry
Old 13-06-2011, 4:20 PM
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Default What to do next????

We used PeelAway. Is a complete complete nightmare - and has taken months to do a whole room (and ).

Looks good though.

Anyone suggest what to use to paint it now?

Dan
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# 13
Leif
Old 15-06-2011, 4:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stina View Post
Hi,

I found the porridge option to work well for me after reading your posts. Thanks!

Now to my question: What paint should I use to repaint the stripped cornicing? It is very detailed Victorian cornicing and I don't want it to clog up, that would make all the work stripping it pointless...

Emulsion paint? Does it need to be watered down and layered? Without paint it is beige and I want to paint it white.

Thankful for advice!!
I tried porridge on woodwork, probably gloss oil paint on wood, and on some painted plaster, lord knows what kind of paint. In neither case did it do anything at all. Is this a wind up or did you really use porridge? And if so, what kind of paint was it and on what surfaces? and did you add sugar or salt? Yeah, I know, an obvious comment. I'm sorry if your post was genuine, but it does seem like a wind up to me, and I wasted time trying porridge. I stick to Eco Solutions for painted wood, though sanding is better IMO.
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# 14
Ali-Green
Old 15-10-2011, 1:30 PM
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Default Re-painting after using Klingstrip

Hi guys,
I have been stripping door frames with Klingstrip to remove lead paint. It did a brill job, but it takes litres and litres of water to remove and trace of the chemical on the wood so it is very messy. Now that my door frames are cleand and dry I have started to repaint but the primer/undercoat is no going on at all well; it is blistering and peeling.

Is there something I should be treating the wood with before I paint so this doesn't happen?

I hope someone can help - my carpets arrive in 2 weeks and I have a lot to do!

Thanks
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# 15
Ali-Green
Old 16-10-2011, 12:17 PM
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"You also will need to neutralise the surfaces once they've been fully stripped (using either a proprietary neutraliser or your own solution of white vinegar) to ensure that any subsequent paint or varnish takes properly."


I know the above post was posted years ago, but can anyone tell me where I can buy some proprietary neutraliser?
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# 16
Leif
Old 16-10-2011, 3:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali-Green View Post
"You also will need to neutralise the surfaces once they've been fully stripped (using either a proprietary neutraliser or your own solution of white vinegar) to ensure that any subsequent paint or varnish takes properly."


I know the above post was posted years ago, but can anyone tell me where I can buy some proprietary neutraliser?
Search for Kling Strip and you will find the manufacturer. Then look for the data sheet, and that should tell you what you need to know. Kling Strip is not the same but I think it is similar i.e. caustic soda based. Do check though in case I am wrong.
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# 17
rogercorke
Old 05-11-2011, 7:45 AM
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Question Stripping sealant off a stone floor

I've got a flagstone floor which is covered in some sort of sealant which I've tried to get off with paintstripper. It hasn't touched it. Can anyone recommend anything which will get it off? I wondered about Peel-Away or Kling-Strip, but they are designed for lead paint.
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# 18
greenlaws
Old 06-11-2011, 12:24 PM
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Paint finishes - try NOT to use plastic based paints - they form an impervious layer and can flake. Best to use one of the new clay paints which are green, and dont trap any form of moisture, thus wont peel. I think a company called Earthborn do them - a lot of my clients use these, from this company, and have had really good results. Good luck with the porridge!
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# 19
Madeinoz
Old 25-11-2011, 3:23 PM
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Question Stripping Table legs

I have 4 Victorian carved oak table legs that appear to have been French Polished a long time ago. I have read reviews on Peel Away 7 and none actualy state whether this stuff works on French Polish or not. Once Stripped I want to finish them with a wax polish. Can anyone help?

Thanks
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# 20
woodking
Old 06-12-2011, 10:39 AM
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Peelaway 7 should work but avoid Peelaway 1 as this has been known to turn oak black because of its caustic properties.

As with any wood finishing product, i would suggest getting a tester pot or the smallest pot available and testing it on a section that is less visible to see how it performs.

Sample packs of Peelaway 7 are avaialable online at...

wood-finishes-direct
decorating direct
restexpress
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