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  • FIRST POST
    itgirlinuk
    London areas - where to buy?
    • #1
    • 7th Feb 05, 11:46 AM
    London areas - where to buy? 7th Feb 05 at 11:46 AM
    Official MSE Insert:

    If you've arrived from Google, our fully researched House Buying Tips may help.

    Back to the original post...


    I don't know how many Londoners are on this site, but I was wondering if people could post replies to message regarding areas that they consider good / safe to live / bad / avoid it if you can.

    I would help me choose an area (I am currently look all over and at all areas in Zone 2 & 3 and I dont know London very well).

    Please help me get an idea of the areas I should concentrate on and avoid.

    Thanks in advance
    Last edited by Former MSE Zorica; 05-02-2014 at 5:52 PM.
Page 1
  • Joannaclaire
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 05, 10:05 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 05, 10:05 AM
    Depends what your budget is and whether you are after a house/flat/ mansion etc..... there are some lovely parts of London and some really hellish and 3rd world looking ones. Also where do you need to be near to for work/relatives/friends etc.

    As a rough suggestion not knowing your situation and what your needs are, I'd suggest Islington, Fulham, Battersea, Dulwich, Tuffnell Park and Clapham as nice generally safe areas but they are also pricey, but then most of London is these days. If you have a bigger budget then go for Hampstead, Chelsea, Notting Hill, Richmond, Maida Vale, South Kensington. Personally I'm not a big fan of East or north-east London and anywhere south or south-east of Clapham, but that's just me...

    There is a book available at bookshops/amazone etc that gives you an idea of areas, called The New London Property Guide, ed. Carrie Segrave. And www.upmystreet.co.uk also gives you info such as population/schools/crime stats etc for areas.
  • monki_man
    • #3
    • 9th Feb 05, 3:00 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Feb 05, 3:00 PM
    Some parts of Greenwich is nice, Maze Hill is ok as well
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    • VickyA
    • By VickyA 12th Feb 05, 5:47 PM
    • 4,413 Posts
    • 21,438 Thanks
    VickyA
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 05, 5:47 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Feb 05, 5:47 PM
    Peckham Rye is an up and coming area. I've a friend whose parents live there and it's really getting better and better. It's even got some "trendy" bars! Never used to when my friend was growing up there................
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    • theGrinch
    • By theGrinch 12th Feb 05, 11:35 PM
    • 2,910 Posts
    • 697 Thanks
    theGrinch
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 05, 11:35 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Feb 05, 11:35 PM
    london is really so vast and the question so general.

    the first thing to consider are travelling arrangements from home to where. this will usually dictate the corridor you will live in. then you need to break that corridor down. as a rule of thumb the further you move out the cheaper the property becomes (though not always true).

    if you give us a guide to the area you work or study, how long you are prepared to travel, and your budget then I could suggest some areas.
    "enough is a feast"...old Buddist proverb
    • Dan29
    • By Dan29 16th Feb 05, 4:02 PM
    • 4,506 Posts
    • 4,074 Thanks
    Dan29
    • #6
    • 16th Feb 05, 4:02 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Feb 05, 4:02 PM
    West/south west:

    Chiswick
    Ealing
    Richmond
    Putney
    .
    • westernpromise
    • By westernpromise 16th Feb 05, 4:22 PM
    • 4,263 Posts
    • 5,548 Thanks
    westernpromise
    • #7
    • 16th Feb 05, 4:22 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Feb 05, 4:22 PM
    I don't know how many Londoners are on this site, but I was wondering if people could post replies to message regarding areas that they consider good / safe to live / bad / avoid it if you can.

    I would help me choose an area (I am currently look all over and at all areas in Zone 2 & 3 and I dont know London very well).

    Please help me get an idea of the areas I should concentrate on and avoid.

    Thanks in advance
    by itgirlinuk
    You don't want to be south of the river. South Laandon is a grotty provincial town with poor transport links that just happens, by an accident of geography, to abut London proper, which starts on the north bank.

    Budget is everything. How much do you want to spend? Are you buying or renting?
    Buying a house, if you believe the market has a way to fall, or if you are paying sill asking prices ( like some sheeple ) or if you are buying in London, is now a massive financial gamble!!!!! - June 8, 2012 by TheCountOfNowhere
  • bluesnice
    • #8
    • 16th Feb 05, 10:17 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Feb 05, 10:17 PM
    I've lived north west and south west and have to say I prefer the south west. I wouldn't live in the n east, east or south or se at all. I found NW ok, but didn't really feel that safe in some place and they drive worse there too.

    I think london is different things to different people and everyone has a favourite place.

    I love richmond and sheen but its on the flight path and expensive. PUtney is nice. If you move further west there are some really nice villages (well, they call themselves that) such as weybridge, walton, mosely, hampton, sunbury.

    good luck in your hunt.
    • jat100
    • By jat100 17th Feb 05, 3:59 AM
    • 174 Posts
    • 19 Thanks
    jat100
    • #9
    • 17th Feb 05, 3:59 AM
    • #9
    • 17th Feb 05, 3:59 AM
    While some areas of East London are not wonderful places to live (i.e not like Hampstead, Islington or Greenwich), they are not bad and prices are pretty cheap at the moment compared to the rest of London. East London also has the added advantage of its' proximity to Canary Wharf and The Square Mile for anyone who works there. Transport links have improved over recent years ((with the Jubilee Line, etc) and are continuing to expand. Also, there is a lot of regeneration at present (e.g. the Channel Tunnel link at Stratford) and more so if the 2012 Olympic bid is successful. New shopping areas and bars, etc have been opened over the last couple of years. Most (but not all) of Leyton, Leytonstone and Stratford are safe places to live (as much as anywhere in London is) and with the regeneration going on, any property bought in this area is likely to significantly increase in value over the coming years. I have lived in this area for 20 years and have always considered it safe. In most cases, it's a question of what you're used to - I never liked South London and thought it unsafe until I spent years working there without any problems.
  • Lighteater
    Same as Anywhere...
    ..check where the new transport links are going to be, and buy there.

    Lighteater
  • itgirlinuk
    South East London
    I have always been a north london person, but I did visit Peckam and areas around there and I like it.

    Any suggestions in South East London, within Zone 2? And my budget is around 200K and I am looking for a 2/2.5/3 bed.
  • starlight
    I came up to London for a few days to visit a friend and was totally gobsmacked by the Canary Wharf site - I loved it. There seem to be a lot of new houses being built in the general area as well as apartment blocks with secure and manned receptions. We took the ferry up river and I was fascinated by the massive changes since I was there 20 years before. The other thing that struck me was the amount of wildlife using the river (not just the rowers!).

    The flight into City Airport was excellent and once the Docklands Light Railway is complete it will be so easy to up and go if you need to.

    However, as my years are starting to add up and the joints don't flex quite like they used to, I am happy not to live in London as it lends itself so well to the young and fit and I don't think I could keep up.
  • itgirlinuk
    And its expensive to buy as well...That's the reason I have given up on the river view apartments, because they don't fit within my budget. :-(
    The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it back in your pocket. :rolleyes:
    • Dan29
    • By Dan29 20th Feb 05, 8:32 PM
    • 4,506 Posts
    • 4,074 Thanks
    Dan29
    Any suggestions in South East London, within Zone 2?
    by itgirlinuk
    Greenwich
    Clapham
    Canary Wharf
    .
  • dippy
    Greenwich
    Clapham
    Canary Wharf
    by Dan29
    Greenwich and Canary Wharf, I agree

    Clapham Common is nice. Clapham North, North-east is rough.
  • loanranger
    For pretty good growth prospects I'd look at the royal docks (e16) where the DLR extension is currently under construction.

    You should be able to get partial dock views for that kind of money..

    For a selection of property take a look at

    http://www.royaldocks.com

    Thanks
    Z

    "It is better to fail in originality than succeed in imitation." Herman Melville.
    • gromituk
    • By gromituk 21st Feb 05, 10:52 PM
    • 3,031 Posts
    • 540 Thanks
    gromituk
    Generalisations
    There have been some gross generalisations on this thread, one of which was obviously flame-bait and would be laughted out of court, but some others could be taken seriously. On the other hand, you can perhaps benefit from some of the snobbery to the tune of a large amount of price differential for no apparent difference otherwise. I just wanted to emphasise that you can very rapidly go from a nice to a not-so-nice area and vice versa, which I appreciate makes choosing very difficult.

    My objection to the proliferation of these gated apartment complexes is that it can turn their neighbourhoods into car-dominated ghost towns where if you are outside the walls you feel very isolated and vulnerable. And people are notoriously lazy about security, letting both vehicles and people "tailgate" in.

    There is always a premium on new properties which I can't understand - they are not necessarily built any better than older places, and the NHBC guarantee is like a sieve.

    If you want to live in the centre of the action, with night clubs and a vast selection of restaurants within staggering distance, you are going to pay more - and suffer the resulting rowdiness.

    If transport links are not very good, you could consider taking up cycling - you beat the traffic, save huge amounts and keep fit. But it obviously requires confidence and the ability to withstand getting wet - about once a month if you are commuting.

    Just a few thoughts - money saving is about lateral thinking, after all!
    Time is an illusion - lunch time doubly so.
  • nickytv
    I recently moved to Turnpike Lane. Been a Londoner for 14 years and lived north, south, east (but not west). Love this area. Zone 3 Piccadilly line, two mulitscreen cinemas, shopping centre, plus lots of ethnic food stores serving the diverse community. Not a lot of trendy bars but do you really want to pay through the nose to live somewhere with overpriced lattes served to the people-carrier driving double-buggy brigade? Alexander Palace just up the road. My one bed flat with roof terrace overlooking a park cost me 150,000 in September. I also paid NO STAMP DUTY as lots of streets are exempt as it is a regeneration area. As with anywhere, you have to do your homework to avoid dodgy bits - but it's commonsense really.
    nicky at betty tv
  • itgirlinuk
    I know there are a lot of generalisations. But it helps me to get a view on how people look at things and what they mean when they say it.

    I have decided to go for an area, which feels safe when you walk around and a flat that makes me want it. I know its gut feeling and its very emotional...but is that so wrong?
    The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it back in your pocket. :rolleyes:
  • filigree
    Personally speaking, if I had 200K I would look at Crystal Palace. Huge park, loads of transport links, numerous "trendy" businesses and a few bohemian type bookshops, junk shops, antique markets etc. Some streets are conservation areas but they might cost more than 200K. The sticking point for me (apart from cost) is that local schools are hugely variable.

    It might sound odd but you could try http://www.ofsted.gov.uk for their reviews of local schools. It doesn't matter if you have kids or not, the Ofsted report gives a snapshot of the local area. It will tell you for example if the area is deprived, does it have a transient population etc. OTOH some reviews will tell you that a certain school serves an area with affluent families, high home ownership etc. If you do have kids, or plan to have a family, then local schools are an important consideration.

    www.tfl.gov.uk will help you find routes from home -> work, which is an important consideration. You don't want to find yourself at the wrong end of a poor bus service with no access to tube or train.

    Look at the travel zone and the council tax band. You could save a few grand on the asking price by choosing an apparently cheap area, then find out you have moved into an expensive borough - Haringey charges an astonishing amount for very poor services. Wandsworth's services are pretty poor too, but at least we aren't paying over 1000 a year for the privilige!
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