Double Glazing deposit refund

A couple of weeks ago a double glazing firm came to our home to give us a quote.

To cut a long story short we handed over a cheque for a deposit but had told the salesman we didnt know when we would have the windows fitted as we couldn't afford it straight away.

Reality has set in and now we need to cancel the order (the surveyor hasn't been yet so no units have been made) I want to know if I am entitled to get my deposit refunded or is the company entitled to refuse a refund?

Thanks in advance

Replies

  • ukwoodyukwoody Forumite
    531 Posts
    There is a colling of period to any "distance selling " transaction which you may well be covered by. They may also be entitled to keep a percentage of your money back though. You could really do with checking out your rights ona legal forum.

    woody
    City & Guilds qualified Wood Butcher:D
  • maninthestreetmaninthestreet Forumite
    16.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    If you invited the DG firm to visit your home to give you a quote, you may well have no statutory cooling-off period. However, if the visit was scheduled as the result of the DG firm cold-calling you, then a cooling-off period may well apply. Does the contract state any cooling-off period applied?
    "You were only supposed to blow the bl**dy doors off!!"
  • DNKDNK Forumite
    67 Posts
    I had my windows done a while back and gave a £50 deposit which they stated was refundable. I was told that I could get the deposit back at any time prior to the surveyor coming round. After they've been then the windows get built. I didn't need to actually get the deposit back as they offered the best deal anyway out of the several quotes I obtained.
  • sashmansashman Forumite
    318 Posts
    100 Posts
    ✭✭
    mrsmudge

    You do have a cooling off period under consumer law providing the agreement/order was placed in your home (I think its 7 days), if you sign an order in a company premises that cooling off period is not applicable. This is to prevent pressure selling.

    Nethertheless it may be you are outside the time scale, but DO write to confirm you do not wish to proceed. A court will take your letter into account should the business not act with due consideration for your wishes.

    Do not let the surveyor on your premises. The only cost the business can claim they paid out would be the commission to the sales man for selling the windows, however no reputable business would insist you go through with the purchase if they havent made anything

    Consider the GGF and ask trading standards for actual terms of cooling off periods, but do get something in writing as soon as you can.

    sashman
    Buying quality goods which last, should be an investment that saves money. :T
    Buying cheap products which fail, wastes money and costs twice as much in the long run. :mad:



  • Rex_MundiRex_Mundi Forumite
    6.3K Posts
    1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    sashman wrote: »
    mrsmudge

    You do have a cooling off period under consumer law providing the agreement/order was placed in your home (I think its 7 days), if you sign an order in a company premises that cooling off period is not applicable. This is to prevent pressure selling.

    Nethertheless it may be you are outside the time scale, but DO write to confirm you do not wish to proceed. A court will take your letter into account should the business not act with due consideration for your wishes.

    Do not let the surveyor on your premises. The only cost the business can claim they paid out would be the commission to the sales man for selling the windows (and possibly the surveyors time), however no reputable business would insist you go through with the purchase if they havent made anything

    Consider the GGF and ask trading standards for actual terms of cooling off periods, but do get something in writing as soon as you can.

    sashman

    Very good advice (as always) from sashman. My only further comment is above (in red).

    It would also be a good idea to check the terms of the contract you have signed regarding deposits. They should state what the company expects in circumstances like this. Though I can't see how they can justify holding onto your money before they have measured up and made any product for you.
    How many surrealists does it take to change a lightbulb?
    ...
    ...
    ...
    ...
    Fish
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides