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No insulation (and no space for it) = damp

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  • MouldyOldDough
    MouldyOldDough Posts: 1,851 Forumite
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    My house has this sort of roof. The blurb called it 'galleried ceilings', it's 1908.
    When we moved in in 1883 the ceilings were black with mould in 4 of the bedrooms, mostly behind 1950's style hardboard built-in wardrobes. 
    We striped out the wardrobes and installed an airbrick in each bedroom and the problem has never returned even in the rooms which are largely unheated. I thought the airbricks would be drafty but TBH I don't even notice them now
    We still have airbricks in each room but they make no difference
    We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 5,102 Forumite
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    Photo, MOD?
  • GDB2222
    GDB2222 Posts: 24,885 Forumite
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    My house has this sort of roof. The blurb called it 'galleried ceilings', it's 1908.
    When we moved in in 1883 the ceilings were black with mould in 4 of the bedrooms, mostly behind 1950's style hardboard built-in wardrobes. 
    We striped out the wardrobes and installed an airbrick in each bedroom and the problem has never returned even in the rooms which are largely unheated. I thought the airbricks would be drafty but TBH I don't even notice them now
    We still have airbricks in each room but they make no difference
    We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower
    Are you saying that you get damp on the ceiling/walls after it rains?  How about when it's cold and dry?




    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
  • MouldyOldDough
    MouldyOldDough Posts: 1,851 Forumite
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    GDB2222 said:
    My house has this sort of roof. The blurb called it 'galleried ceilings', it's 1908.
    When we moved in in 1883 the ceilings were black with mould in 4 of the bedrooms, mostly behind 1950's style hardboard built-in wardrobes. 
    We striped out the wardrobes and installed an airbrick in each bedroom and the problem has never returned even in the rooms which are largely unheated. I thought the airbricks would be drafty but TBH I don't even notice them now
    We still have airbricks in each room but they make no difference
    We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower
    Are you saying that you get damp on the ceiling/walls after it rains?  How about when it's cold and dry?





    No - we get condensation on the ceiling on the outside 2 or 3 feet when it is cold - the roof itself is fine
    I never mentioned rain...
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 5,102 Forumite
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    Insulated p'board, applied directly to the underside of your sloping roof = cure.
  • GDB2222
    GDB2222 Posts: 24,885 Forumite
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    edited 18 March at 2:34PM
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    GDB2222 said:
    My house has this sort of roof. The blurb called it 'galleried ceilings', it's 1908.
    When we moved in in 1883 the ceilings were black with mould in 4 of the bedrooms, mostly behind 1950's style hardboard built-in wardrobes. 
    We striped out the wardrobes and installed an airbrick in each bedroom and the problem has never returned even in the rooms which are largely unheated. I thought the airbricks would be drafty but TBH I don't even notice them now
    We still have airbricks in each room but they make no difference
    We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower
    Are you saying that you get damp on the ceiling/walls after it rains?  How about when it's cold and dry?





    No - we get condensation on the ceiling on the outside 2 or 3 feet when it is cold - the roof itself is fine
    I never mentioned rain...

    Ah, you said: "We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower", and I misunderstood what you meant! :)
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
  • MouldyOldDough
    MouldyOldDough Posts: 1,851 Forumite
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    GDB2222 said:
    GDB2222 said:
    My house has this sort of roof. The blurb called it 'galleried ceilings', it's 1908.
    When we moved in in 1883 the ceilings were black with mould in 4 of the bedrooms, mostly behind 1950's style hardboard built-in wardrobes. 
    We striped out the wardrobes and installed an airbrick in each bedroom and the problem has never returned even in the rooms which are largely unheated. I thought the airbricks would be drafty but TBH I don't even notice them now
    We still have airbricks in each room but they make no difference
    We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower
    Are you saying that you get damp on the ceiling/walls after it rains?  How about when it's cold and dry?





    No - we get condensation on the ceiling on the outside 2 or 3 feet when it is cold - the roof itself is fine
    I never mentioned rain...

    Ah, you said: "We also use an electrical dehumidifier every time that we have a shower", and I misunderstood that! :)

    Ha Ha - no I meant a shower in the bathroom !!
  • MouldyOldDough
    MouldyOldDough Posts: 1,851 Forumite
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    edited 20 March at 12:14PM
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    Here are photos of the mould, showing the sloping ceiling - with no insulation (or space for insulation) above the sloping bit.. the mould lines up with beams above
    As can be seen - an airbrick


  • ian1246
    ian1246 Posts: 237 Forumite
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    edited 20 March at 12:17PM
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    As others have said... insulated plasterboard is the answer.

    Basically any moisture in your room is condensing on the coldest surface - the sloping bit, causing the mold.

    By insulating it, it ll be less cold & therefore less condensation/mould. Remove the existing plaster & plaaterboard, apply new insulated plasterboard - you'll loose a few inches in height but should solve the problem.

    Make sure the insulated plasterboard has a vapour barrier so no vapour gets through to the timber of the roof - and tape the edges of the plasterboard etc... to where it joins the rest of the ceiling/wall to maintain the vapour barrier.
  • MouldyOldDough
    MouldyOldDough Posts: 1,851 Forumite
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    ian1246 said:
    As others have said... insulated plasterboard is the answer.

    Basically any moisture in your room is condensing on the coldest surface - the sloping bit, causing the mold.

    By insulating it, it ll be less cold & therefore less condensation/mould. Remove the existing plaster, apply new insulated plasterboard - you'll loose a few inches in height but should solve the problem.

    You mean on the inside of the ceiling ?
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