Calculating working days per tax year

I get paid hourly with my wage coming in every month. I've noticed that my employer uses 260 days to calculate what I get paid every month but with this being a leap year, I was wondering if I should be paid more. I work weekdays and after totting up from April 6th 2023 to April 2024, I've seen that there are actually 262 week days. After googling I've seen that the correct value should be 260 days. How is this so?

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  • 400ixl
    400ixl Posts: 2,587
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    Most people are salaried annually so the number of working days is irrelevant. That annual salary is split into equal months for pay, otherwise it would be different each month as months do not have equal number of days.
  • Elliott.T123
    Elliott.T123 Posts: 140
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    Thor, I am a little confused, you say you get paid hourly but then that your employer uses 260 days to calculate what you get paid? Someone more knowledgeable may correct me but I was under the impression that if an individual is paid hourly then they should be paid for the hours they work not an estimated number?


  • Marcon
    Marcon Posts: 9,887
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    thor said:
    I get paid hourly with my wage coming in every month. I've noticed that my employer uses 260 days to calculate what I get paid every month but with this being a leap year, I was wondering if I should be paid more. I work weekdays and after totting up from April 6th 2023 to April 2024, I've seen that there are actually 262 week days. After googling I've seen that the correct value should be 260 days. How is this so?
    Why do they use days if you are hourly paid? If you're on minimum wage, then yes, you do need to be paid for the 'leap day'.
    Googling on your question might have been both quicker and easier, if you're only after simple facts rather than opinions!  
  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 8,852
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    Your mixing terms so it's not clear if you are on an hour rate contract or a salary. If you are on an hour rate contract as you initially imply then "days" are irrelevant, you simply get paid how many hours you worked in the period. 

    For salary you normally just take your annual monies and divid by 12 to get your monthly pay. The main time it gets more complex is if you take unpaid leave in which case the monies need to be reduced to reflect that. Overtime is often done as time in lieu so doesn't require a rate being calculated when you have to do the occasional weekend or such. 
  • EnPointe
    EnPointe Posts: 242
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    Thor, I am a little confused, you say you get paid hourly but then that your employer uses 260 days to calculate what you get paid? Someone more knowledgeable may correct me but I was under the impression that if an individual is paid hourly then they should be paid for the hours they work not an estimated number?


    does the OP mean they are genuinely  'paid hourly '  or does the OP mean their  pay is  expressed as a  hourly rate and they have to clock in  but  are fundamentally being paid a salary 
  • thor
    thor Posts: 5,483
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    Sorry about the confusion. I get paid by the hour and am expected to clock in for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. If I'm late clocking in then I'll lose the equivalent amount of pay for that month. My monthly wage(or salary?) is worked out by multiplying 260(days) x 8(hours)x hourly rate divided by 12 months.. So I'm just wondering why when this year I'll be working 262 eight hour days why they use 260. Is this any clearer?
  • Marcon
    Marcon Posts: 9,887
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    thor said:
    Sorry about the confusion. I get paid by the hour and am expected to clock in for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. If I'm late clocking in then I'll lose the equivalent amount of pay for that month. My monthly wage(or salary?) is worked out by multiplying 260(days) x 8(hours)x hourly rate divided by 12 months.. So I'm just wondering why when this year I'll be working 262 eight hour days why they use 260. Is this any clearer?
    Sounds as if you are actually on an annual salary (with a 'reference hourly rate' used to calculate pay lost if you arrive late), so it doesn't really matter how many 'days' your employer uses as the basis.

    If you're still puzzled, probably best to speak to them.
    Googling on your question might have been both quicker and easier, if you're only after simple facts rather than opinions!  
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