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Composite/plastic cladding

Calidad
Calidad Posts: 49
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edited 14 January at 6:38PM in House buying, renting & selling
We are looking at properties in Norfolk and have noticed a couple of housing developers (we are not only looking at new builds) seem to be using a sort of composite/plastic type cladding on properties.

Haven't really come across this material being used on houses before. Does anyone know about flammability, durability, insurance issues etc. Not sure if they’ll date badly too.

Any thoughts welcome.  

Thanks 

Comments

  • caprikid1
    caprikid1 Posts: 2,109
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    If you are asking questions so will the next buyers.

    Looks horrible and cheap to me. Might be covering a timber frame construction.
  • Alderbank
    Alderbank Posts: 2,696
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    edited 12 January at 4:08PM
    Perhaps not used in East Anglia but in most parts of the country it has been common for houses to have horizontal uPVC cladding on features such as gables for decades. It weathers much better than wood and doesn't require painting.
    Since the Grenfell fire new regulations have made requirements more stringent for buildings more than 11 metres high (4-5 storeys)
  • Albermarle
    Albermarle Posts: 21,124
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    edited 12 January at 4:32PM
    There a few parts of the UK where having wood siding on a house is traditional for the area. So often new builds in the same area will try and look similar, although they use a type of plastic siding nowadays. This is because it withstands the weather a lot better than painted wood, like a PVC window does.
    It will be fire resistant, and not related to the type that caused the Grenfell fire.
    It is very common in the USA.
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,253
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    Three types of material used for cladding -
    uPVC - Can discolour over time, and can also burn even if treated with fire retardants.
    Wood - The traditional material to use. Will change colour over time if just oiled. Requires regular maintenance. Like uPVC, it will burn, but is usually treated with a fire retardant which helps.
    Cement board - Minimal maintenance required. Fire resistant and non-combustible.

    It is worth asking the developers which material is used, and how well it would cope with fire.
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  • km1500
    km1500 Posts: 2,120
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    edited 13 January at 8:06AM
    it is probably a lot cheaper for the developer than building in brick of course
  • Albermarle
    Albermarle Posts: 21,124
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    FreeBear said:
    Three types of material used for cladding -
    uPVC - Can discolour over time, and can also burn even if treated with fire retardants.
    Wood - The traditional material to use. Will change colour over time if just oiled. Requires regular maintenance. Like uPVC, it will burn, but is usually treated with a fire retardant which helps.
    Cement board - Minimal maintenance required. Fire resistant and non-combustible.

    It is worth asking the developers which material is used, and how well it would cope with fire.
    A proper quality uPVC should be guaranteed for 10 years against discolouration, although the strength of the colour shade might fade a bit. White cladding ( like white windows) will last the longest.
    Also it is inherently fire resistant, so would not normally be treated with extra fire retardant. In a very fierce fire it might melt a bit and give off toxic fumes, but by that time you would have either escaped or be dead anyway.

  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    edited 13 January at 12:36PM
    caprikid1 said:
    ... Might be covering a timber frame construction.
    So might (a single skin of) bricks.
  • Calidad
    Calidad Posts: 49
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    Thanks for all your comments. 

    I’ll find out what material the boarding is. It certainly isn’t wood, and the property isn’t a timber frame construction, but brick/block. 
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