Permitted development front porch

We’ve decided on a front porch, external area of 3m2 so falls within permitted development.  Was planing to manage this small project myself, as I have a groundworker, bricklayer, roofer and plaster who are friends.
will a PD porch need inspecting by BC throughout the build etc? 
And who determines or how will I determine foundation depth required?

is there anywhere I can download a standard 3m2 porch design from?
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  • stuart45
    stuart45 Posts: 3,821
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    Building regs don't normally apply to a porch of that size.
    Even so, it's important to get the foundations done properly. The bricklayer should be able.to advise you. Rule of thumb is 1metre. 
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    edited 30 December 2023 at 8:15AM
    stuart45 said:
    Building regs don't normally apply to a porch of that size.
    Even if the door is removed or replaced with an internal-grade one? Or (not independent) heating is added?

  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,248
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    grumbler said:
    stuart45 said:
    Building regs don't normally apply to a porch of that size.
    Even if the door is removed or replaced with an internal-grade one? Or (not independent) heating is added?
    If the door is replaced with an internal grade one or removed completely, the porch becomes part of the habitable space. Planning and BR would then kick in, although it might still fall within permitted development, so not need planning. Putting a radiator in the space might trigger BR, but how many porches really need heating - I have a south facing one, and it gets roasting hot out there in the summer. In the winter, it is just there to provide shelter and somewhere to dump wet shoes.

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  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    edited 30 December 2023 at 12:50PM
    Would you be happy with the 3m2 max size, Longwalks? If the precedent for larger has been set by others in the 'hood, then getting PP for a slightly larger porch should be a formality.
    It would be a shame to be restricted if having a bit larger would be more useful and also more attractive - it'll become a major contributor to your house's kerbie.
    What style are you after? What's your current home like?

    If the porch will be used for storing coats and stuff, then decent ventilation should be factored in.
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,486
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    If the porch will be sued for storing coats and stuff, then decent ventilation should be factored in.
    Hopefully the porch would have added LP to its insurance and would be covered for this eventuality. :)
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,486
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    grumbler said:
    stuart45 said:
    Building regs don't normally apply to a porch of that size.
    Even if the door is removed or replaced with an internal-grade one? Or (not independent) heating is added?

    If the existing external door is removed then the porch becomes an extension, not a porch.

    The rules for porches are quite restrictive.  So as TIW suggests, it makes sense to think about what you actually want as the end result, rather than designing to fit within PD just to avoid the (relatively cheap) planning fee.
  • longwalks1
    longwalks1 Posts: 3,702
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    FreeBear said:
    If the door is replaced with an internal grade one or removed completely, the porch becomes part of the habitable space. Planning and BR would then kick in, although it might still fall within permitted development, so not need planning. Putting a radiator in the space might trigger BR, but how many porches really need heating - I have a south facing one, and it gets roasting hot out there in the summer. In the winter, it is just there to provide shelter and somewhere to dump wet shoes.

    Thanks FreeBear - we was hoping to replace the existing front door with an internal one, or remove it completely to make a larger hallway, with wet underfloor heating (same as we’ve just laid in the kitchen)

    I think we will need to go down planning route then, for the sake of the cost of planning we may as well get it how we originally wanted (or as near to as allowed)
    Larger than 3m2 (was originally wanting between 3m or 4m wide and 1.5m depth) and remove the current front door completely. 
  • longwalks1
    longwalks1 Posts: 3,702
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    edited 30 December 2023 at 2:13PM
    Would you be happy with the 3m2 max size, Longwalks? If the precedent for larger has been set by others in the 'hood, then getting PP for a slightly larger porch should be a formality.
    It would be a shame to be restricted if having a bit larger would be more useful and also more attractive - it'll become a major contributor to your house's kerbie.
    What style are you after? What's your current home like?

    If the porch will be used for storing coats and stuff, then decent ventilation should be factored in.
    Hi ThisIsWeird - I don’t think we would be happy with the 3m2, most houses in our close have a standard sized porch (I’m assuming, haven’t measured them but they are all very very similar) but a couple do have larger ones, and one is 2m deep x 3.6m wide (found their planning drawing) and has a shower room in it. 

    Not sure how to describe the style we want, standard brick built with a small window and a hipped, tiled roof to match our 1930’s home.  Which is red brick ground floor, pebbledash 1st floor (our street won’t win any prizes in a beauty contest, even though it’s in a beautiful village)
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    Not sure how to describe the style we want, standard brick built with a small window and a hipped, tiled roof to match our 1930’s home.  Which is red brick ground floor, pebbledash 1st floor (our street won’t win any prizes in a beauty contest, even though it’s in a beautiful village)

    If you'd like to post a photo... :-)
    Really worth a lot of surfing for such a significant part of your home - it's presumably on the front elevation, so is what folk will first notice about your house? LOTS of ideas on Google and Pinterest, for example.
    If you are going to remove the original front door/turn it into an 'internal', then - yes - BC will be required. If you go that route, then expect the cost to increase significantly. Adding wet UFH to this porch will be a further significant cost. If you are 'happy' to accept these significant increases, then I'd suggest make darned sure the design is fully what you want. Also bear in mind that doubling the size (for example), will not be close to double the price.
    Personally, but not knowing the house aesthetics, I'd be looking for a mix of practical addition to the home (storage, clothes, boots, etc) and improved kerb appeal. For these, size is important - not too big, certainly not too small.
    I'd place making it an 'extension' waaay down that list, unless it really was a practical usable space that you'd use in practice.
    Ie, don't make it 'habitable' unless you really will inhabit it. If it's large enough, and will be a nice place to sit out in, then consider making it 'habitable'. But if it's just to make the hallway a bit longer and brighter, that seems to me to be a silly way to spend money. It'll cost you - ooh - double to make it habitable, so be absolutely sure it's needed. And that this money isn't better spent on added size and features.
    Even if it's just a 'porch' - ie, not heated and not insulated to current standards - you will still be able to 'live' in it, and be able to leave the house's internal door open, for most of the year, in essence, whenever the sun comes out. 
    To keep it heated when the sun ain't out, just to have a longer hallway, is not what I would personally do.
    Of course, if you want to go 'large' and fit a shower room in it, then - yes - an 'extension' it must be!
    Photo of house front?

  • longwalks1
    longwalks1 Posts: 3,702
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    Hi all
    Sorry for the delay in replying, am currently juggling other issues at present so this keeps getting bumped down my list. 
    We've decided it will just be a porch, and not a livable space.  Our neighbours have just had one built, but there's nothing on local planning site (I wanted to see any drawings they had done) but its 2m x 2m (external).  How would this of been possible? They used a very well known and respected local building company to do the work
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