End of Year review

Hi all,

I have received a less than glowing end of year review from my manager. 

When asked to explain - the responses were very odd. None of which were raised in any one to one. 
He mentioned that colleagues did not feel like approaching me for support.

I have requested that this be re reviewed during the end of year meeting. 
Is it best that I document all points raised with rebuttal OR await response/re review? 

 
Any suggestions much appreciated!

Comments

  • Marcon
    Marcon Posts: 10,045
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    rosefer said:
    Hi all,

    I have received a less than glowing end of year review from my manager. 

    When asked to explain - the responses were very odd. None of which were raised in any one to one. 
    He mentioned that colleagues did not feel like approaching me for support.

    I have requested that this be re reviewed during the end of year meeting. 
    Is it best that I document all points raised with rebuttal OR await response/re review? 

     
    Any suggestions much appreciated!
    I'm a bit confused by your post. You say you've had the end of year review, and then say you want your manager's comments reviewed during the 'end of year' meeting. Is that a different meeting tomorrow, with someone other than your manager, or what?
    Googling on your question might have been both quicker and easier, if you're only after simple facts rather than opinions!  
  • ArbitraryRandom
    ArbitraryRandom Posts: 2,345
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    edited 28 December 2023 at 11:42PM
    I'm assuming you had a 'paper' report from your manager and there's a meeting booked to discuss it? 

    You say you would appreciate suggestions so... while I appreciate you do not feel you have done anything wrong, the from what you've said the issue is one of interpersonal relationships rather than productivity or performance? As such, I would recommend: 

    1. Try not to be aggressive or defensive (don't go in with 'rebuttals') - be open to the possibility that how others see you is not how you see yourself. Unfairly, challenging the review directly risks reinforcing that you are aggressive and someone colleagues couldn't approach... so the softer approach of focusing on solutions/the next review is likely to be better longer term (assuming you want to stay in the team/area).  

    2. Use it as a constructive meeting - You are surprised that the issues raised were not mentioned in previous 1:1s; so express this surprise and ask as an action that in future meetings your manager raise any issues so you can try to address them at the time. Essentially feed back upwards (nicely) that his performance as a manger has been lacking if this is a surprise... 

    3. Ask for examples (though don't expect to be told who specifically has a problem with you) - if you can recall the event, relate it from your perspective not as an excuse but as an explanation and ask for advice on how you could have handled it differently from your manager. Then use that advice (even if it's bad) and ask for feedback by email or at your next 1:1 - This would hopefully achieve a couple of things inc putting your manager in the role of mentor and helping him see that if there's a relationship/personality issue in the team, it's not you that's the problem... 

    4. Try to set out a plan to be reviewed at your next 1:1 - nothing as formal as a performance improvement plan (unless your manager insists!) but something you can use to document that you are performing as your manager requested - building your evidence so that if you get a poor review at the next meeting it's entirely unsupported by the records of your meetings. 

    Just some suggestions for how I would approach it :) 

    Edit: this gives basically the same advice but words it better :) https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/sample-response-to-negative-performance-review
    I'm not an early bird or a night owl; I’m some form of permanently exhausted pigeon.
  • I'm assuming you had a 'paper' report from your manager and there's a meeting booked to discuss it? 

    You say you would appreciate suggestions so... while I appreciate you do not feel you have done anything wrong, the from what you've said the issue is one of interpersonal relationships rather than productivity or performance? As such, I would recommend: 

    1. Try not to be aggressive or defensive (don't go in with 'rebuttals') - be open to the possibility that how others see you is not how you see yourself. Unfairly, challenging the review directly risks reinforcing that you are aggressive and someone colleagues couldn't approach... so the softer approach of focusing on solutions/the next review is likely to be better longer term (assuming you want to stay in the team/area).  

    2. Use it as a constructive meeting - You are surprised that the issues raised were not mentioned in previous 1:1s; so express this surprise and ask as an action that in future meetings your manager raise any issues so you can try to address them at the time. Essentially feed back upwards (nicely) that his performance as a manger has been lacking if this is a surprise... 

    3. Ask for examples (though don't expect to be told who specifically has a problem with you) - if you can recall the event, relate it from your perspective not as an excuse but as an explanation and ask for advice on how you could have handled it differently from your manager. Then use that advice (even if it's bad) and ask for feedback by email or at your next 1:1 - This would hopefully achieve a couple of things inc putting your manager in the role of mentor and helping him see that if there's a relationship/personality issue in the team, it's not you that's the problem... 

    4. Try to set out a plan to be reviewed at your next 1:1 - nothing as formal as a performance improvement plan (unless your manager insists!) but something you can use to document that you are performing as your manager requested - building your evidence so that if you get a poor review at the next meeting it's entirely unsupported by the records of your meetings. 

    Just some suggestions for how I would approach it :) 

    Edit: this gives basically the same advice but words it better :) https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/sample-response-to-negative-performance-review

    This is an excellent response.
  • There are some great comments here; I would also want to explore the policy/procedure around such Year Reviews - has this been followed, and what guidance is there for the reviewer and the reviewee?


  • Savvy_Sue
    Savvy_Sue Posts: 45,838
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    During one review I learned some of my colleagues were scared of me. And one of them once asked me not to be patronising. Complete surprise both times. 

    It was just the once, and to avoid scariness I started telling new colleagues I might appear grumpy, but it was rarely personally directed ...
    Signature removed for peace of mind
  • EnPointe
    EnPointe Posts: 259
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    Savvy_Sue said:
    During one review I learned some of my colleagues were scared of me. And one of them once asked me not to be patronising. Complete surprise both times. 

    It was just the once, and to avoid scariness I started telling new colleagues I might appear grumpy, but it was rarely personally directed ...
    I was once told I was far to sarcastic and to tone it down a bit, I just thanked him for the wonderful advice.
    that is very  subjective and contextual... 
  • EnPointe said:
    Savvy_Sue said:
    During one review I learned some of my colleagues were scared of me. And one of them once asked me not to be patronising. Complete surprise both times. 

    It was just the once, and to avoid scariness I started telling new colleagues I might appear grumpy, but it was rarely personally directed ...
    I was once told I was far to sarcastic and to tone it down a bit, I just thanked him for the wonderful advice.
    that is very  subjective and contextual... 
    It was a good joke.
  • EnPointe
    EnPointe Posts: 259
    First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    EnPointe said:
    Savvy_Sue said:
    During one review I learned some of my colleagues were scared of me. And one of them once asked me not to be patronising. Complete surprise both times. 

    It was just the once, and to avoid scariness I started telling new colleagues I might appear grumpy, but it was rarely personally directed ...
    I was once told I was far to sarcastic and to tone it down a bit, I just thanked him for the wonderful advice.
    that is very  subjective and contextual... 
    It was a good joke.
    it's also the kind of thing  which is  not carefully cdone  ends up with you tapping the boards   with a complaint  using the Dignity at work policy ... and ironically it;s often the boomers who are the ones complaining ...
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