Used car, dispute with dealer - no key

Hi all,

I purchased a used car from a dealer on 23rd October. They are an RAC approved dealer and backed by RAC multipoint check and warranty ( I extended to 2 years).

The car has keyless ignition and entry. On Thursday last week the car warned me that the battery in the key fob was low. I went to change it and was discovered that in the FOB there was NO emergency metal key. I checked the other fob, also no key. Rang a main dealer (Ford) and they confirmed it should have a key. 

I've contacted the used car dealer and they have basically said that as a month has passed they are washing their hand of the matter and 'You've bought a 7 year old car, there are bound to be things missing' is the line they have used.

I don't think it's unreasonable to be provided with a key!

Ford have said that they don't hold key code information for any vehicle, so the only way to get a key is to replace all locks, which will run up quite a bill.

As I understand it, I have options through RAC disputes resolution, I paid a deposit of £500 on credit card and there is always the small claims option.

Is there anything else that I could do to put pressure on the used dealer?

Thanks

Comments

  • Does seem very strange both metal keys are missing and the dealer is so relaxed about it! 

    Its not good that they haven't provided them.
    You could send them a letter before action to try and force their hand
    FTB - April 2020 
  • chrisw
    chrisw Posts: 3,364
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    I do agree you should have been provided with a metal key and they are often also used to disable the passenger airbags. However, I've never used the metal key over at least 25 years, neither has anyone I know. I would lean on the dealer but I don't think I'd worry about it unduly if that didn't get me anywhere.
  • Goudy
    Goudy Posts: 1,416
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    I know someone that's had a similar experience.

    The car sold was a repossession, they had obviously bought it with no keys or paperwork.

    The selling dealer had paid for a new remote, keyless fob part to be programmed to the car by a specialist but not the metal key part.

    The Keyless Fob part is easy to clone once the specialist has access to the OBD port, but the metal key is more difficult without another key to copy.

    It's either a new locks set and key or they pay the dealer for the replacement metal key via the cars chassis number, which tends to be expensive.


  • It's not unreasonable to be provided with a key - but, a month and a half after the purchase, there's no proof that the key wasn't there at the time.

    You'd think Ford would keep codes - other manufacturers certainly do - but it seems that the lock set might not be as expensive as you think.
    https://shop.ford.co.uk/products/lock-cylinder-repair-kit (taking a guess at a 2017 Focus hatch)
    Yes, there's labour on top, but that won't be horrendous at a non-dealer.

    I learnt the hard way to check spare keys on purchase, when the transponder in the main key for our car died - and the spare I'd been given turned out to be for a completely different car. I had to get the car trailered to a main dealer, and spend hundreds to have a key cut to code and programmed in.
    At least you're only after the emergency backup blade and can drive the car.
  • mluton
    mluton Posts: 796
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    When we misplaced our only key to our Picasso, we just called a car locksmith, 2 days later he turned up with a key, opened the door on arrival with the key and programmed it.

    You wont have to replace the locks, but you may have a bill. Ask for a contribution from the dealer if you sort it.
  • It's not unreasonable to be provided with a key - but, a month and a half after the purchase, there's no proof that the key wasn't there at the time.

    You'd think Ford would keep codes - other manufacturers certainly do - but it seems that the lock set might not be as expensive as you think.

    Yes, there's labour on top, but that won't be horrendous at a non-dealer.

    I learnt the hard way to check spare keys on purchase, when the transponder in the main key for our car died - and the spare I'd been given turned out to be for a completely different car. I had to get the car trailered to a main dealer, and spend hundreds to have a key cut to code and programmed in.
    At least you're only after the emergency backup blade and can drive the car.
    Thanks for this. Close... It's a 2016 Galaxy (hance the username)

    So an update on this. Following a few interesting phone calls today and a trip to a local Auto Locksmith who can only be described as a Wizard of some description. He was able to decide the lock get into the car and cut 2 blades in 30 mins which was fantastic and worrying in equal measure.

    Spoke to someone high enough up in the dealership to take me seriously and they have reimbursed me the £70 it cost me. They are also looking through their records to see if they tested the 12v battery on inspection also as I had to change that over the weekend also.

    Cars are great fun.
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