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Damp or Not

2»

Comments

  • Bring the house up to temperature and air it and that should sort itself out.

    The downstairs has been sitting between 15C at nght and 18C during the day. The upstairs is always warmer as it's south facing with big windows. I'm not convinced that it's not at temperature. In all the other properties I've lived in there's never been must, mould or high humidity. This even applies to a north of Scotland property where you would wake up in winter seeing your own breath and where the indoors very rarely reached these temperatures across the whole house during the colder months.
    With those temps you can run a good (not cheap) dehumidifier to see how much moisture you are pulling out and measure it. See if it improves things.

    Yes, we can keep it under control with a dehumidifier, but I just want to identify the problem. Once we know the cause then we can start to look at solutions.
  • I would try heating the downstairs a little higher see if it has any effect.

    All houses require a different level of heating to keep the moisture at comfortable levels. It could just be that with this floor being below ground level and north facing it needs that extra bit of heat.

    Yes, for sure. Increasing the heat reduces the RH. I've started to measure AH (absolute humidity) because we really need to see how much moisture is being retained in the house and/or added to it. During this recent spell of very dry air there is zero problem.
  • We live in a house built of stone and find it difficult to heat (without spending a fortune).

    In the summer when it's 30 degrees outside the downstairs remains cool, for the last 3 years there has been a period of excessive humidity around October, it was particularly bad this year at the end of September when we had that mini heat wave after a miserable summer, the warm, wet air was sucked into the cool downstairs of the house and then condensed on the stone floors and walls, we had puddles on the slate floor downstairs. 

    We do the usual things living wise to keep the house free of excessive humidity but during these brief spells of humid weather other than running a dehumidifier I'm not sure what can be done. 

    Same as yourself we get more than or fair share of rain, the house being built into a slope won't help but if you are renting there's not much to be done as I doubt the landlord is going to have it dug out. 

    Checking where the down pipes, particularly at the back, soak away to might be worth a look as well. 
    It sounds like we have a very similar situation then in some respects.

    If it's just an October issue then we are good and will just have to wear the dehumidifier solution for the month. We aren't seeing condensation, except after a shower in the vicinity as you would expect, and once when the first cold weather hit hard and the temperature difference between inside and outside must've been extreme. Incidentally, this was after starting to heat the house more and made a much greater temperature difference at the windows leading to the condensation. It's not happened since and the air stays pretty dry at the moment.

    I do believe that opening the windows to get fresh air in during October kept the internal air at higher humidity as we were taking that in and then adding our own contribution. Next year, I'll experiment a bit more.

    If we are waking up in the morning and AH is less or the roughly the same as at bed time, which it is currently, then it doesn't seem that the house isn't able to breathe and/or vent well enough. Does it suggest no damp, I don't know? If there is a damp contribution would it be constant throughout the year dragging moisture up from the ground or would it alter so quickly with the dry spell that's recently started? I've gathered lots of data and I'm trying to sift through it to ensure that a measure approach to the problem is taken if, indeed, there is one.

    I'm sorry to hear about your situation with water on the floor. Given the stone conducts heat away quicker than some other surfaces would another flooring solution help or even some type of temporary cover?

    Checking the down pipes is a great idea. Thank you. We need some rain and an increase in humidity to check these things now. I might also tape some plastic over the walls where the higher readings came from to see if moisture accumulates on the inside.

  • We live in a house built of stone and find it difficult to heat (without spending a fortune).

    In the summer when it's 30 degrees outside the downstairs remains cool, for the last 3 years there has been a period of excessive humidity around October, it was particularly bad this year at the end of September when we had that mini heat wave after a miserable summer, the warm, wet air was sucked into the cool downstairs of the house and then condensed on the stone floors and walls, we had puddles on the slate floor downstairs. 

    We do the usual things living wise to keep the house free of excessive humidity but during these brief spells of humid weather other than running a dehumidifier I'm not sure what can be done. 

    Same as yourself we get more than or fair share of rain, the house being built into a slope won't help but if you are renting there's not much to be done as I doubt the landlord is going to have it dug out. 

    Checking where the down pipes, particularly at the back, soak away to might be worth a look as well. 
    It sounds like we have a very similar situation then in some respects.

    If it's just an October issue then we are good and will just have to wear the dehumidifier solution for the month. We aren't seeing condensation, except after a shower in the vicinity as you would expect, and once when the first cold weather hit hard and the temperature difference between inside and outside must've been extreme. Incidentally, this was after starting to heat the house more and made a much greater temperature difference at the windows leading to the condensation. It's not happened since and the air stays pretty dry at the moment.

    I do believe that opening the windows to get fresh air in during October kept the internal air at higher humidity as we were taking that in and then adding our own contribution. Next year, I'll experiment a bit more.

    If we are waking up in the morning and AH is less or the roughly the same as at bed time, which it is currently, then it doesn't seem that the house isn't able to breathe and/or vent well enough. Does it suggest no damp, I don't know? If there is a damp contribution would it be constant throughout the year dragging moisture up from the ground or would it alter so quickly with the dry spell that's recently started? I've gathered lots of data and I'm trying to sift through it to ensure that a measure approach to the problem is taken if, indeed, there is one.

    I'm sorry to hear about your situation with water on the floor. Given the stone conducts heat away quicker than some other surfaces would another flooring solution help or even some type of temporary cover?

    Checking the down pipes is a great idea. Thank you. We need some rain and an increase in humidity to check these things now. I might also tape some plastic over the walls where the higher readings came from to see if moisture accumulates on the inside.

    I should have added we don't really see a problem with condensation on the windows, a bit here and there, mainly the bathroom, but nothing concerning.

    Last Friday I dotted the dehumidifier about, it pulled a bit of water out the bedroom but you breathe out water when sleeping so it's expected, the other parts of the house were dry, compare that to a couple of months ago when the 5l bucket would fill to brim and it's clearly the outside climate, affecting us at least. 

    Another thought may be, if the previous tenants weren't heating, ventilating, etc the house and the extra moisture from those living conditions could be sitting in the walls that might not help. Our house was really damp when we purchased it mainly because it was neglected, 10 years of looking after it has made a big difference. 

    Our floors downstairs should be insulated really, it would be a massive upheaval which would be worth doing if we had that problem all year round but for the odd week or two I don't think the upset is worth it. 

    There's definitely been a change in the weather for the last 3 years where we are, things like DVDs have a ring on the back cover where they've become damp and the paper has moulded itself into the ring on the plastic case, I see the same thing when looking a DVDs in the charity shops so it's not just us and it's something that's never happened before even when the house was really bad at the start. 

    We're looking at a commercial 
    dehumidifier for next year, the one we've got is pretty large and works well but is very old (was here when we moved in), the one I was looking at claims to pull 30l at 60% humidity and 50l at 80%, at 12 hours a day that's probably around £2.50 a day which might work out less than putting the heating on (we heat with wood which comes from various places so it's hard to pin point the cost of that exactly) but spending an extra £35 a year to cover that two week or so period of extremely humid weather seems a small cost in the grand scheme of things.
  • We live in a house built of stone and find it difficult to heat (without spending a fortune).

    In the summer when it's 30 degrees outside the downstairs remains cool, for the last 3 years there has been a period of excessive humidity around October, it was particularly bad this year at the end of September when we had that mini heat wave after a miserable summer, the warm, wet air was sucked into the cool downstairs of the house and then condensed on the stone floors and walls, we had puddles on the slate floor downstairs. 

    We do the usual things living wise to keep the house free of excessive humidity but during these brief spells of humid weather other than running a dehumidifier I'm not sure what can be done. 

    Same as yourself we get more than or fair share of rain, the house being built into a slope won't help but if you are renting there's not much to be done as I doubt the landlord is going to have it dug out. 

    Checking where the down pipes, particularly at the back, soak away to might be worth a look as well. 
    It sounds like we have a very similar situation then in some respects.

    If it's just an October issue then we are good and will just have to wear the dehumidifier solution for the month. We aren't seeing condensation, except after a shower in the vicinity as you would expect, and once when the first cold weather hit hard and the temperature difference between inside and outside must've been extreme. Incidentally, this was after starting to heat the house more and made a much greater temperature difference at the windows leading to the condensation. It's not happened since and the air stays pretty dry at the moment.

    I do believe that opening the windows to get fresh air in during October kept the internal air at higher humidity as we were taking that in and then adding our own contribution. Next year, I'll experiment a bit more.

    If we are waking up in the morning and AH is less or the roughly the same as at bed time, which it is currently, then it doesn't seem that the house isn't able to breathe and/or vent well enough. Does it suggest no damp, I don't know? If there is a damp contribution would it be constant throughout the year dragging moisture up from the ground or would it alter so quickly with the dry spell that's recently started? I've gathered lots of data and I'm trying to sift through it to ensure that a measure approach to the problem is taken if, indeed, there is one.

    I'm sorry to hear about your situation with water on the floor. Given the stone conducts heat away quicker than some other surfaces would another flooring solution help or even some type of temporary cover?

    Checking the down pipes is a great idea. Thank you. We need some rain and an increase in humidity to check these things now. I might also tape some plastic over the walls where the higher readings came from to see if moisture accumulates on the inside.

    I should have added we don't really see a problem with condensation on the windows, a bit here and there, mainly the bathroom, but nothing concerning.

    Last Friday I dotted the dehumidifier about, it pulled a bit of water out the bedroom but you breathe out water when sleeping so it's expected, the other parts of the house were dry, compare that to a couple of months ago when the 5l bucket would fill to brim and it's clearly the outside climate, affecting us at least. 

    Another thought may be, if the previous tenants weren't heating, ventilating, etc the house and the extra moisture from those living conditions could be sitting in the walls that might not help. Our house was really damp when we purchased it mainly because it was neglected, 10 years of looking after it has made a big difference. 

    Our floors downstairs should be insulated really, it would be a massive upheaval which would be worth doing if we had that problem all year round but for the odd week or two I don't think the upset is worth it. 

    There's definitely been a change in the weather for the last 3 years where we are, things like DVDs have a ring on the back cover where they've become damp and the paper has moulded itself into the ring on the plastic case, I see the same thing when looking a DVDs in the charity shops so it's not just us and it's something that's never happened before even when the house was really bad at the start. 

    We're looking at a commercial 
    dehumidifier for next year, the one we've got is pretty large and works well but is very old (was here when we moved in), the one I was looking at claims to pull 30l at 60% humidity and 50l at 80%, at 12 hours a day that's probably around £2.50 a day which might work out less than putting the heating on (we heat with wood which comes from various places so it's hard to pin point the cost of that exactly) but spending an extra £35 a year to cover that two week or so period of extremely humid weather seems a small cost in the grand scheme of things.

    We live in a house built of stone and find it difficult to heat (without spending a fortune).

    In the summer when it's 30 degrees outside the downstairs remains cool, for the last 3 years there has been a period of excessive humidity around October, it was particularly bad this year at the end of September when we had that mini heat wave after a miserable summer, the warm, wet air was sucked into the cool downstairs of the house and then condensed on the stone floors and walls, we had puddles on the slate floor downstairs. 

    We do the usual things living wise to keep the house free of excessive humidity but during these brief spells of humid weather other than running a dehumidifier I'm not sure what can be done. 

    Same as yourself we get more than or fair share of rain, the house being built into a slope won't help but if you are renting there's not much to be done as I doubt the landlord is going to have it dug out. 

    Checking where the down pipes, particularly at the back, soak away to might be worth a look as well. 
    It sounds like we have a very similar situation then in some respects.

    If it's just an October issue then we are good and will just have to wear the dehumidifier solution for the month. We aren't seeing condensation, except after a shower in the vicinity as you would expect, and once when the first cold weather hit hard and the temperature difference between inside and outside must've been extreme. Incidentally, this was after starting to heat the house more and made a much greater temperature difference at the windows leading to the condensation. It's not happened since and the air stays pretty dry at the moment.

    I do believe that opening the windows to get fresh air in during October kept the internal air at higher humidity as we were taking that in and then adding our own contribution. Next year, I'll experiment a bit more.

    If we are waking up in the morning and AH is less or the roughly the same as at bed time, which it is currently, then it doesn't seem that the house isn't able to breathe and/or vent well enough. Does it suggest no damp, I don't know? If there is a damp contribution would it be constant throughout the year dragging moisture up from the ground or would it alter so quickly with the dry spell that's recently started? I've gathered lots of data and I'm trying to sift through it to ensure that a measure approach to the problem is taken if, indeed, there is one.

    I'm sorry to hear about your situation with water on the floor. Given the stone conducts heat away quicker than some other surfaces would another flooring solution help or even some type of temporary cover?

    Checking the down pipes is a great idea. Thank you. We need some rain and an increase in humidity to check these things now. I might also tape some plastic over the walls where the higher readings came from to see if moisture accumulates on the inside.

    I should have added we don't really see a problem with condensation on the windows, a bit here and there, mainly the bathroom, but nothing concerning.

    Last Friday I dotted the dehumidifier about, it pulled a bit of water out the bedroom but you breathe out water when sleeping so it's expected, the other parts of the house were dry, compare that to a couple of months ago when the 5l bucket would fill to brim and it's clearly the outside climate, affecting us at least. 

    Another thought may be, if the previous tenants weren't heating, ventilating, etc the house and the extra moisture from those living conditions could be sitting in the walls that might not help. Our house was really damp when we purchased it mainly because it was neglected, 10 years of looking after it has made a big difference. 

    Our floors downstairs should be insulated really, it would be a massive upheaval which would be worth doing if we had that problem all year round but for the odd week or two I don't think the upset is worth it. 

    There's definitely been a change in the weather for the last 3 years where we are, things like DVDs have a ring on the back cover where they've become damp and the paper has moulded itself into the ring on the plastic case, I see the same thing when looking a DVDs in the charity shops so it's not just us and it's something that's never happened before even when the house was really bad at the start. 

    We're looking at a commercial 
    dehumidifier for next year, the one we've got is pretty large and works well but is very old (was here when we moved in), the one I was looking at claims to pull 30l at 60% humidity and 50l at 80%, at 12 hours a day that's probably around £2.50 a day which might work out less than putting the heating on (we heat with wood which comes from various places so it's hard to pin point the cost of that exactly) but spending an extra £35 a year to cover that two week or so period of extremely humid weather seems a small cost in the grand scheme of things.
    I think you are right. If your house is only suffering for a few weeks of the year then using a dehumidifieris probably the best option. Keeping the moist air out would require a lot of work on the leaks in the house and some sort of pump or dehumidifier anyway to reduce the moisture before being insulated from the outside would help. It would be too expensive I'd think.

    I am going to work from the same point of view as you and use the dehumidifier. I'll keep an eye on the levels throughout the year and I'm going to tape plastic over the high dampmeter areas of the wall to see if condensation occurs on the inside. If not then I'll assume the reading is affected by salt, or as you suggested water from previous tenants that needs to be pushed out. I don't think it's the latter as 15C+ seems enough. We also note that our absolute humidiity before bed is higher than after waking so the bedroom walls do seem to breathe adequately.

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