Speakers for a Synthesizer keyboard.

Hi all. 
I recently purchased a Roland XP-10 Synthesizer keyboard. I have been learning on an old Casio which has built in speakers. This Roland needs external speakers to be able to listen to what I'm playing. My question is, what exactly do i need. The Synthesizer has output jack sockets which are larger than the one that fits am i pod etc. I have been told an old guitar amp would do but, I would like a proper set up with duel speakers if there are any. 
Thanks for reading, I look forward to someone being able to help. 
Jeff. 

Comments

  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 9,182
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    edited 7 November 2023 at 2:07PM
    You need to find out what output the keyboard has... its presumably line level mono 

    Actually a quick google shows it has a mono output but also a R output as a separate jack, not sure it'll will actually produce anything in stereo or just dual mono. 

    Easiest thing to do is get an active speaker, Roland do ones that would be suitable for small gigs but it could be as simple as a set of computer speakers if you don't need the output of a the official ones. If not that you can plug it into any hifi or such that has a spare input. 

    It takes 1/4" mono jacks, depending on if your speaker comes with a socket or fixed cable it will just be a matter of buying the appropriate cable or adaptor  
  • Andy_L
    Andy_L Posts: 12,744
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    The sockets are probably 1/4 inch vs the 1/8 in that ipods etc use. You can get adaptors
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Headphone-Adapter-Posugear-Adaptor-Plated-2-Gold/dp/B073NXQ35H
    (1st hit on amazon, not a recommendation)

    How many & how are they labelled?

    If one says (head)phones then you should be able to plug some PC speakers into it via an adaptor.

    Then there might be one or 2. either mono output as GullGreyGuy said or a L&R pair for stereo. 



  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 9,182
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    edited 7 November 2023 at 2:20PM
    Andy_L said:
    The sockets are probably 1/4 inch vs the 1/8 in that ipods etc use. You can get adaptors
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Headphone-Adapter-Posugear-Adaptor-Plated-2-Gold/dp/B073NXQ35H
    (1st hit on amazon, not a recommendation)

    How many & how are they labelled?

    If one says (head)phones then you should be able to plug some PC speakers into it via an adaptor.

    Then there might be one or 2. either mono output as GullGreyGuy said or a L&R pair for stereo. 
    There are three... L "Mono", R (both line level) and Headphones 

    Active speakers, like PC speakers, would normally use the line level output rather than headphones which will be going through a small amp.
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    Jeff, how much are you happy to pay?
  • Heedtheadvice
    Heedtheadvice Posts: 2,428
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    edited 8 November 2023 at 11:26AM
    Some good info above.
    Headphones that have a 1/4" stereo jack plug ( or adaptor) can be used for 'private listening. Worth buying decent ones as the Roland is of good quality.

    Speakers. Choice depends upon the use to which you are putting  them.
    If it is just a budget listen then a budget pair of self powered Speakers with (again) 1/4" mono jacks will suffice that accept domestic or pro line level inputs. The latter often associated with higher quality monitor Speakers usually have what is known as balanced inputs but these can be made to work with the mono 'single ended' outputs with some adaptors. These latter ones should be used if you need to ensure pro quality results that you will be using in mixes.
    You can also feed those L&R Jack outputs into  stereo hifi via suitable cables from the 2 Jack's to match those on the hifi ( or music centre) line level  inputs.
    Further you can also use budget self powered external computer speakers via an adaptor again for connections (2 1/4" mono jack plugs to stereo 3mm jack socket or even feed directly into a computer line input in a similar manner.

    Much depends depends on your listening purpose and desired quality!
    Cheap guitar amp/ speakers are usually not great quality and maybe best avoided. You can pick up much better speakers on the second  hand markets.
    Similarly avoid high powered PA speakers as they can have excessive noise that would be obtrusive in a domestic environment.
    Yamaha, KRK (and lots of others including Roland !) are worthy of consideration second hand if you do not want to to buy at a new retail price.
    Do not get Bluetooth connected speakers (not compatible) and even via a Bluetooth transmitter as there may be an unacceptable delay between finger and ears!!


  • daveyjp
    daveyjp Posts: 12,395
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    Daughter has Pioneer DJ DM-40D active speakers for her turntable, DJ deck and keyboard.  For the money they are just the job.

    Argos have them for £120.  You will need the adapter shown above.
  • Thank you all for your replies. I'm will to spend over £100 to get a sound from the Roland. 
    In the meantime, I watched a youtube video which shows a lead from Synth to Hi fi speakers which actually worked, 
    I have yet to decide which would be the best way to do so. 
  • DigSunPap
    DigSunPap Posts: 375
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    Yamaha HS5s are a great bet. Almost standard in most home studios.
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