Air Fryer Faulty or not please help.

I purchased an air fryer yesterday, not an expensive one, but within my budget.

I went to use it last night and plugged it in, it tripped my electricity.

I've never had this happen with any other electrical appliances before so I'm at a loss at what I do.
I contact the shop I brought it from and they said it could be my ciruit breaker doesn't have a suitable fuse, I'm using too many electrical appliances at the same time or the airfryer is faulty.

The electrical stuff that was on was a lamp, the kitchen light, a laptop and a computer. If my circuit breaker isn't fused correctly surely other electrical appliances would trip it also.

I was also told to get an electrician to test it.

I think, but don't know as I'm not an electrician, that the air fryer is faulty.

I have the original box and packaging but not th plastic bag it was in. I was told I couldn't return it without that as they needed all the original packaging to sell it again.

So what should I do. Take it back and say it faulty?


Comments

  • Rodders53
    Rodders53 Posts: 2,084
    First Anniversary Name Dropper Photogenic First Post
    Forumite
    What device trips?
    A residual current device or a miniature circuit breaker - or both?  Picture marked up may help?

    Sort through your rubbish bin to find that "missing" plastic bag (or another clear poly bag to replace it)?  But you are returning it as it is patently faulty so don't necessarily need the packing.

    What make and model air fryer.  Most are relatively low wattage.
    What shop is this?  National retailer or small local business.

    It's not down to you to prove an inherent fault on a new device.  Unless the shop has no RCD protection when they plug it in to test it'll trip their supply (which might be a good laugh if it takes out their tills).
  • You do not have to use the original packaging to return it, that requirement was dropped some time ago.  If they're going to accept it as faulty and then re-sell it, I wouldn't buy a replacement from them.
  • Rodders53 said:
    What device trips?
    A residual current device or a miniature circuit breaker - or both?  Picture marked up may help?

    Sort through your rubbish bin to find that "missing" plastic bag (or another clear poly bag to replace it)?  But you are returning it as it is patently faulty so don't necessarily need the packing.

    What make and model air fryer.  Most are relatively low wattage.
    What shop is this?  National retailer or small local business.

    It's not down to you to prove an inherent fault on a new device.  Unless the shop has no RCD protection when they plug it in to test it'll trip their supply (which might be a good laugh if it takes out their tills).
    The air fryer trips, all I did was plug it in a socket and turn the dial to switch it on. Then the lights and sockets went off downstairs.

    I don't know what brand it is, I got it from Dunelm. 

    The info on the instruction book is power 1300 watts, voltage 220-240v, frequency 50-60Hz.

    So should I just take it back, i purchased it online but I can take it to my nearest shop. 

    Thanks for your help, much appreciated.
  • Just clean it up and return it as damaged/not working.  Personally, if I have a non working item, I mark the box with the words 'non-working' to make reselling more difficult.   They shouldn't be selling it to anyone else without refurbishing it at the very least.  As said previously, if you are returning it within 6 months as damaged, legally, the fault is regarded as inherent.  You don't have to do massive checks on your electrics to prove anything.
  • Worth trying a known-to-be-working appliance like a hairdryer in the same socket, just to eliminate the possibility that there's a problem with that socket?
  • Worth trying a known-to-be-working appliance like a hairdryer in the same socket, just to eliminate the possibility that there's a problem with that socket?
    Exactly this - or a kettle - something that has similar or greater wattage. If your air fryer is 1300w - plug something in that would use the same amount of power. If it still trips - it's the socket/circuit, if it doesn't it's the fryer. 
    An ex-bankrupt on a journey of recovery. Feel free to send me a DM reference credit building credit cards from the usual suspects :) Happy to help others going through what I've been through!
  • Worth trying a known-to-be-working appliance like a hairdryer in the same socket, just to eliminate the possibility that there's a problem with that socket?

    It's the same socket I use for my kettle, so there is no issue with my electrics.
  • Going by the comments I've had so far, I'm going to return it and say it's faulty. The socket I used is the same one I use for my kettle so I have had no issues with that or any other sockets in the house for that matter.

    Thanks to all for the help it's very much appreciated.
  • Okell
    Okell Posts: 607
    First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    If your kettle and the air fryer both draw the same wattage and the kettle is OK but the air fryer trips a fuse, that proves the air fryer is faulty.

    As you only bought it yesterday you are entitled to exercise your "short-term" right to reject it under s19, s20 and s22 of the Consumer Rights Act 2015 (legislation.gov.uk).  This also entitles you to a full refund.

    Because the item is faulty it doesn't matter that you don't have all the packaging.  You don't need any of the packaging to exercise your statutory right to reject for a full refund under the above legislation.

    Explain all that to Dunelm when you go back for your refund.
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