Right to strike?

Can someone who KNOWS rather than guesses, is it true that in this country today, we are not allowed to strike unless the focus of the strike if centred on pay. So a strike solely on working conditions is not lawful?
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  • Marcon
    Marcon Posts: 10,636 Forumite
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    Can someone who KNOWS rather than guesses, is it true that in this country today, we are not allowed to strike unless the focus of the strike if centred on pay. So a strike solely on working conditions is not lawful?
    Pretty much anyone can answer that: it's rubbish. 
    Googling on your question might have been both quicker and easier, if you're only after simple facts rather than opinions!  
  • MalMonroe
    MalMonroe Posts: 5,783 Forumite
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    I'm guessing you are in a union - because otherwise, striking is not legal. There should be some guidance in your union handbook though, if you are in a union. 

    There's also government information here - https://www.gov.uk/industrial-action-strikes

    Striking about working conditions, if you are a member of a union, is perfectly legal. Bear in mind that a trade union can only call for industrial action if a majority of its members involved support it.
    Please note - taken from the Forum Rules and amended for my own personal use (with thanks) : It is up to you to investigate, check, double-check and check yet again before you make any decisions or take any action based on any information you glean from any of my posts. Although I do carry out careful research before posting and never intend to mislead or supply out-of-date or incorrect information, please do not rely 100% on what you are reading. Verify everything in order to protect yourself as you are responsible for any action you consequently take.
  • NBLondon
    NBLondon Posts: 5,528 Forumite
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    GingerTim said:
     Non-union members can strike perfectly legally and have exactly the same legal protections against dismissal as union members, provided the strike action is official and valid. 
    That only means a non-member taking part in industrial action at a workplace where union members are legally striking (after ballot etc.) gets the same protection. If you're not a union member - you can't unilaterally declare "I'm on strike!" Well you can, but the employer can dismiss you for refusing to work.
    Wash your Knobs and Knockers... Keep the Postie safe!
  • GingerTim
    GingerTim Posts: 2,039 Forumite
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    NBLondon said:
    GingerTim said:
     Non-union members can strike perfectly legally and have exactly the same legal protections against dismissal as union members, provided the strike action is official and valid. 
    That only means a non-member taking part in industrial action at a workplace where union members are legally striking (after ballot etc.) gets the same protection. If you're not a union member - you can't unilaterally declare "I'm on strike!" Well you can, but the employer can dismiss you for refusing to work.
    Quite, hence the bit in bold.
  • molerat said:
    Whoever told you that guff ?
    The rules are to there prevent the old days of the shop steward shouting "everybody out" because they replaced the soft bog roll with shiny stuff.



    Not really any need to be so rude or aggressive.
    No I am not in a union, I was asking because someone in a union who IS striking tomorrow said that, when I asked why they thought they ought to be paid more - I thought their salaries were more than adequate but I would understand if they wanted to strike over working conditions.  Hence their reply that they HAD to strike over pay as they were not allowed to only strike over such things as working conditions.
    Sounded unlikely to me but I tend to go away and check things out for myself before arguing. Hence I came on here in the belief there would be many experienced Trade unionists who could give me an answer.
    Better NOT to assume things about people without checking, eh?
    Thanks to those who have politely given me some answers.
  • Marcon said:
    Can someone who KNOWS rather than guesses, is it true that in this country today, we are not allowed to strike unless the focus of the strike if centred on pay. So a strike solely on working conditions is not lawful?
    Pretty much anyone can answer that: it's rubbish. 

    Why so rude?
    If you don't want to answer a legitimate question please don't.
  • MalMonroe said:
    I'm guessing you are in a union - because otherwise, striking is not legal. There should be some guidance in your union handbook though, if you are in a union. 

    There's also government information here - https://www.gov.uk/industrial-action-strikes

    Striking about working conditions, if you are a member of a union, is perfectly legal. Bear in mind that a trade union can only call for industrial action if a majority of its members involved support it.

    No not in a union and never have been. Thank you anyway.
  • GingerTim said:
    MalMonroe said:
    I'm guessing you are in a union - because otherwise, striking is not legal. There should be some guidance in your union handbook though, if you are in a union. 

    There's also government information here - https://www.gov.uk/industrial-action-strikes


    This is simply untrue. Non-union members can strike perfectly legally and have exactly the same legal protections against dismissal as union members, provided the strike action is official and valid. See your own link at https://www.gov.uk/industrial-action-strikes/your-employment-rights-during-industrial-action.

    Industrial action by non-union members

    Non-union members who take part in legal, official industrial action have the same rights as union members not to be dismissed as a result of taking action.

    Striking about working conditions, if you are a member of a union, is perfectly legal. Bear in mind that a trade union can only call for industrial action if a majority of its members involved support it.
    And, of course, only if more than 50% of the union's members vote one way or the other in the ballot.


    Thanks for the links, very useful.
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