Prescription charges for the over 60's

edited 9 March at 11:54AM in Over 50s Money Saving
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manxie37manxie37 Forumite
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edited 9 March at 11:54AM in Over 50s Money Saving
Couldn't find an appropriate category for this, so hope I get an answer here :)

There have been government proposal to change the free prescription charges for the over 60 but under state pension age. I have tried to keep an eye on this, but cannot find anything lately, the proposals were being pushed to start from April 2022. 

I know Age Concern were/are strongly fighting this.

Can anyone confirm whether us over 60's and under state pension age are going to have to start paying for our prescriptions, if so, when does it start.

Thanks in advance.
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  • soolinsoolin Forumite, Ambassador
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  • arnoldyarnoldy Forumite
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    Hopefully "free" prescriptions can be abolished, and instead if everyone paid then they only need to charge £1.50 and sweep away the cottage industry of who pays a fee or not.

    That will also make people understand the NHS is not "free", and end abuses that have happened like Paracetamol, or Gaviscon on prescription - both available at supermarket for not much money.
  • Carrot007Carrot007 Forumite
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    arnoldy said:
     or Gaviscon on prescription - both available at supermarket for not much money.

    Gaviscon as prescribed costs more than a prescription.

    What is needed is to stop people reselling it for a profit. They even changed the lable to say not for retail sale and they still do it.


    No attempt to even say they are noit reselling prescribed medication with the picture.

  • edited 16 March at 10:06PM
    SilvertabbySilvertabby Forumite
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    edited 16 March at 10:06PM
    I never understood why 'free prescription age' didn't start to gradually increase from 2010 in line with women's State pension age/men's pension credit age.

    If this does go ahead, then anyone on 2 or more prescriptions per month will save money by buying an annual pre-payment card.

    Yes, the system has always been open to abuse.  Some time ago, I overheard a work colleague bragging about how much money she and her family would save once she was 60, as she intended to get paracetamol/cough mixture/ hay fever tabs/e-45 cream and bath oil, etc etc 'free', because she was 'entitled'.

    ADD.  2022 fee for 12 month pre-payment card is £108.10, which can be paid over 10 months.  
  • badmemorybadmemory Forumite
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    My surgery hasn't prescribed paracetamol type meds on free prescriptions for years, just tells you what to buy
  • EmmiaEmmia Forumite
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    Personally as someone who pays (and therefore in a minority allegedly) I think free prescriptions should be tied to state pension age, and anything available over the counter / on the shelf like gaviscon / paracetamol etc. shouldn't be available on prescription at all regardless of age. 

    I realise this won't be popular as a view point, low incomes etc.  and if I was in receipt of the free ones then I'd probably feel differently

    The charging scheme has its irritations, as the HRT I'm on is 2x prescription charges per box, as there are two different drugs involved (no choice on this, I can't just have one half of the pills either).

    I'm also only permitted 3 months at a time, despite being in a low risk group for the contraindications - which again means it costs me twice as much as it could with a 6 month prescription.
  • marlotmarlot Forumite
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    >> I'm also only permitted 3 months at a time

    You must have an understanding GP.  I'm only prescribed one month at a time.
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
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    It's sometimes cheaper to buy 3 month pre payment certificates, if you can schedule your repeat prescriptions. 

    For example, Emmia could buy a 3 month certificate, get her HRT, then ask for a new script just before the certificate expires. Wait nearly 3 months, buy another 3 month certificate, and so on.

    Not everyone can make that work, but DH used to be able to do that with his inhalers and eczema potions.
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  • EmmiaEmmia Forumite
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    marlot said:
    >> I'm also only permitted 3 months at a time

    You must have an understanding GP.  I'm only prescribed one month at a time.
    I've never managed to see a GP in person at my current practice, the hospital menopause clinic is the originator of the prescription.
  • blue.peterblue.peter Forumite
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    Alternatively - and this is the position I'd prefer - all prescriptions should be free at point of acquisition for everyone. I believe that this is the position in Wales and Scotland. (Not sure about NI.) Having said that, I do have some sympathy with @Emmia's view that OTC medications should not be available on prescription at all.

    Obviously, "free at point of acquisition" implies payment through taxation.

    (I don't pay directly for my prescriptions as things stand - I'm over 60. But when I did, I used to buy yearly pre-payment certificates for my blood pressure drugs. And yes, I used to leave buying new certificates until the last minute. Of course, I ran the risk of needing drugs for something else in the interim.)
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