Can I have a wind turbine on my end of terrace?

Who can tell me what kind of wind turbine I can have on my standard Edwardian end of terrace with a long thin 100ft garden? I want it to punch in to the house electrics and sell excess to the grid. I already have solar. Is there a kind of wind turbine I can legally have?!
London. 6.4kwh system, South facing. 16 Hyundai 400kw all black panels w/ optimisers, 6kw Solaredge HD Wave inverter, Solar Iboost with two immersion heaters on one 240l hw tank. Octopus Flux. Ivar 5 Wood Burning Stove. Leaf 62kwh plus Zappi. Two chickens: 1 Light Sussex, 1 Speckled Rock. Omlet walk-in run. Approx 1.5 eggs per day egg generation rate using Marriage's organic layers pellets.
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Comments

  • I presume you are thinking of a standalone wind turbine.  Here are the conditions to erect one without having to apply for  planning permission: https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/57/wind_turbines/3

    I imagine you will find that you don't have room to meet the requirements for minimum height and minimum distance from a boundary (given that your garden is "thin"). 
    Reed
  • Verdigris
    Verdigris Posts: 1,725
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    The first thing you need to do is to find out whether your DNO will allow a G99 connection. Your solar will already have used up your G98 allowance, unless you already have G99.
  • QrizB
    QrizB Posts: 13,624
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    You'll also need to check the average wind speed in your garden. Most housing is built in sheltered spots and so there isn't enough wind to make a turbine worthwhile. If the Edwardians built your terrace on eg. a Welsh hilltop or Scorttish mountain you might be in with a chance.
    We had a similar discussion a few months ago; you might like to read the thread:
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/discussion/6263372/wind-power-vs-solar
    N. Hampshire, he/him. Octopus Go elec & Tracker gas / Shell BB / Lyca mobi. Ripple Kirk Hill member.
    2.72kWp PV facing SSW installed Jan 2012. 11 x 247w panels, 3.6kw inverter. 30MWh generated, long-term average 2.6 Os.
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  • QrizB
    QrizB Posts: 13,624
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    Just to add: this page has a map of wind speed for the UK. You want to be in a darker blue bit.

    N. Hampshire, he/him. Octopus Go elec & Tracker gas / Shell BB / Lyca mobi. Ripple Kirk Hill member.
    2.72kWp PV facing SSW installed Jan 2012. 11 x 247w panels, 3.6kw inverter. 30MWh generated, long-term average 2.6 Os.
    Ofgem cap table, Ofgem cap explainer. Economy 7 cap explainer. Gas vs E7 vs peak elec heating costs.
  • NoobSolar
    NoobSolar Posts: 117
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    This is all very useful. While I would prefer to have it generate and offer power to the grid as well as home, and hence the g99 point was very important, technically what I am asking is not 'will it work well' but simply 'what wind power can I legally install'.

    My solar is installed in Feb. My installer says he is applying for g99. What does that mean?

    Reed Richards points out that a standalone wouldn't get allowed in a terrace. However I am also wondering whether

    1 planning permission could be sought for a house mounted one
    2 off grid is allowed and if so how much and - er, how
    3 could a wind turbine power some sort of heater next to my front door in my lossy cold wall side of the house (and how)
    London. 6.4kwh system, South facing. 16 Hyundai 400kw all black panels w/ optimisers, 6kw Solaredge HD Wave inverter, Solar Iboost with two immersion heaters on one 240l hw tank. Octopus Flux. Ivar 5 Wood Burning Stove. Leaf 62kwh plus Zappi. Two chickens: 1 Light Sussex, 1 Speckled Rock. Omlet walk-in run. Approx 1.5 eggs per day egg generation rate using Marriage's organic layers pellets.
  • tacpot12
    tacpot12 Posts: 7,834
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    QrizB is right that econimically you need to have enough wind to make it worthwhile, I was talking recently with someone with a 6kW turbine located an 8-10 knot area on the map who had been getting 7000kWh+ annually for the last 10 years. This is a great level of production from a 'small' turbine, but it has only just paid for the turbine. 

    From my research, wind power in urban areas is just not economic. To get adequate production you need to have very tall masts (at least twice the height of the house), and even if you can afford such a mast, in urban areas, there will usually be someone living nearby that will object to it. 

    There is nothing to stop you applying for planning permission for a shorter turbine, but without good data on the noise the turbine produces, I doubt you would get permission.

    Battery Storage is a better option than wind in urban environments in my opinion. 
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always try to check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • QrizB
    QrizB Posts: 13,624
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    2. Yes off-grid is allowed, as much as you like provided you comply with planning.
    3. Could it? Yes.
    The problems will be planning and economics. £4000 for even a micro turbine like an AirForce 1 and tower kit will buy you a lot of heating.
    N. Hampshire, he/him. Octopus Go elec & Tracker gas / Shell BB / Lyca mobi. Ripple Kirk Hill member.
    2.72kWp PV facing SSW installed Jan 2012. 11 x 247w panels, 3.6kw inverter. 30MWh generated, long-term average 2.6 Os.
    Ofgem cap table, Ofgem cap explainer. Economy 7 cap explainer. Gas vs E7 vs peak elec heating costs.
  • matelodave
    matelodave Posts: 8,568
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    edited 18 January 2022 at 8:47AM
    I'm not sure you'd be ever so happy with the noise and vibration that would get transmitted into the fabric of the house if you tried mounting on the end wall of your house.

    This might be worth a read, but in general, in a n urban environment you'll probably end up spending a lot more than you'll ever get back Wind Power for the home - TheGreenAge

    I'd guess that your first port of call would be the local planning officer to see what would actually be allowed in the position you are contemplating to locate it.



    Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large numbers
  • Exiled_Tyke
    Exiled_Tyke Posts: 1,175
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    edited 18 January 2022 at 8:51AM
    Wind power benefits hugely from economies of scale, hence commercial turbines have been getting much bigger over the years.  The higher off the ground they get the better the wind and the lower effects of turbulence (which also helps make off-shore so attractive in spite of the conditions).  At a domestic level they are very rarely economical.  Inventors keep claiming to have found designs that are effective for home use but nothing yet has taken off. I'd love it if this RE problem was solved but I can't see it happening. 
    Install 28th Nov 15, 3.3kW, (11x300LG), SolarEdge, SW. W Yorks.
    Install 2: Sept 19, 600W SSE
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  • shinytop
    shinytop Posts: 2,088
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    https://www.tesup.co.uk/

    I have no affiliation nor knowledge of this company or its products but it came up on another forum.    
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