Bright Daughter But Sometimes...

My 20-something year old daughter is bright academically but she's a feather-brain at the same time.
Example - she was applying for jobs and when she does this, she'll apply for 20 or so at a time. She got offers and the one she accepted, sent her a contract through the post...only it never arrived. After a bit of digging, found out she had clicked wrong address on drop-down box e.g. say we live at 56 Blobby Avenue but she clicked 57 in error. The employer said - yes we sent it to 57 Blobby Avenue. 
Of course them at 57 denied getting the letter.
Mind racing - she's probably done it for all 20 applications but I get the - 'you think I'm stupid' dramatics.
I contacted the Royal Mail who said they couldn't do anything as they delived to, in their eyes, the correct address and would do the same for all letters addressed to No 57 despite the postie knowing she doesn't live at 57.
I would have been fine about it but when she went to pharmacy to get a migraine painkiller that pharmacists can issue without a GP prescription, they put her address down as 57 Blobby Avenue with a WRONG dob, saying 'that's what we have on our system' (DOB and address). GP has correct address and DOB so don't know where pharmacy got the misinformation from. It's a type of job that requires background checks so that certificate may well have gone there also but cannot get daughter to check this out with Disclosure people.
If identity fraud does happen, I'll be the one that has to sort it out.
Is there anything I can do re neighbours at No 57?
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  • edited 21 November at 10:49AM
    tacpot12tacpot12 Forumite
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    edited 21 November at 10:49AM
    Your daughter can and should require the Pharmacy to correct her data under GDPR. One of the benefits of GDPR is that you have a right to have inaccurate date corrected. 

    Correcting the information with the employer and asking them to resend the contract would also be appropriate. However, the employer may realise that your daughter is someone who doesn't check important data before pressing 'Save/Send', and may not want to employ her. It might be a valuable lesson learned. 
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always try to check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • UndervaluedUndervalued Forumite
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    PoGee said:
    My 20-something year old daughter is bright academically but she's a feather-brain at the same time.
    Example - she was applying for jobs and when she does this, she'll apply for 20 or so at a time. She got offers and the one she accepted, sent her a contract through the post...only it never arrived. After a bit of digging, found out she had clicked wrong address on drop-down box e.g. say we live at 56 Blobby Avenue but she clicked 57 in error. The employer said - yes we sent it to 57 Blobby Avenue. 
    Of course them at 57 denied getting the letter.
    Mind racing - she's probably done it for all 20 applications but I get the - 'you think I'm stupid' dramatics.
    I contacted the Royal Mail who said they couldn't do anything as they delived to, in their eyes, the correct address and would do the same for all letters addressed to No 57 despite the postie knowing she doesn't live at 57.
    I would have been fine about it but when she went to pharmacy to get a migraine painkiller that pharmacists can issue without a GP prescription, they put her address down as 57 Blobby Avenue with a WRONG dob, saying 'that's what we have on our system' (DOB and address). GP has correct address and DOB so don't know where pharmacy got the misinformation from. It's a type of job that requires background checks so that certificate may well have gone there also but cannot get daughter to check this out with Disclosure people.
    If identity fraud does happen, I'll be the one that has to sort it out.
    Is there anything I can do re neighbours at No 57?
    Apart from asking nicely, nothing at all.

    As I understand it it is perfectly legal to do nothing with incorrectly delivered mail. Obviously if they fraudulently misused information it contained that would be a crime but I don't think there is any legal obligation to forward it or return it to the sender.

    The postie doesn't "know" that there isn't a reason why she is choosing to have her mail sent to a different address. For all he knows she may be getting some mail she doesn't want her parents to see and has asked a neighbour if she can use their address. It happens and it is none of the postie's business.
  • MalMonroeMalMonroe Forumite
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    Hi, I am not trying to be disrespectful in any way but has anyone ever considered that your daughter could suffer from ADHD? It's very difficult to recognise and diagnose and adults can have it. 

    I only ask this because from what you have said, she does appear to display some of the symptoms, as per this link -

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/symptoms/

    There is no shame in being diagnosed - at least I hope not because I was diagnosed myself last year at the grand old age of 70. Yes, at last. I was described as being a very intelligent woman (like your daughter, I am very bright academically) who also has ADHD. It very often isn't diagnosed at all, with people often being described as 'dizzy' and 'disorganised'. I'm happy to have finally been given a reason for my dizzy lifestyle!

    Think about it.

    Maybe it's time to start letting your daughter sort out her own problems now she's 20+ and also why not try to encourage better relationships with your neighbours at number 57? I only have 13 neighbours on the small crescent where I live and thank goodness we are all on friendly - although not overfriendly - terms.  
    My opinions are strictly my own. The forum advises everyone to double-check all information given by any forumite to ensure accuracy. Once commented, I rarely return to a thread, as per this "the moving finger writes and, having writ, moves on" (origin Omar Khayyam). I aspire to the (corny but true) saying - in a world where you can be anything, please be kind.
  • jimbo6977jimbo6977 Forumite
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    MalMonroe said:
    Hi, I am not trying to be disrespectful in any way but has anyone ever considered that your daughter could suffer from ADHD? It's very difficult to recognise and diagnose and adults can have it. 

    I only ask this because from what you have said, she does appear to display some of the symptoms, as per this link -

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/symptoms/

    There is no shame in being diagnosed - at least I hope not because I was diagnosed myself last year at the grand old age of 70. Yes, at last. I was described as being a very intelligent woman (like your daughter, I am very bright academically) who also has ADHD. It very often isn't diagnosed at all, with people often being described as 'dizzy' and 'disorganised'. I'm happy to have finally been given a reason for my dizzy lifestyle!

    Think about it.

    Maybe it's time to start letting your daughter sort out her own problems now she's 20+ and also why not try to encourage better relationships with your neighbours at number 57? I only have 13 neighbours on the small crescent where I live and thank goodness we are all on friendly - although not overfriendly - terms.  
    I was about to ask whether the OP's daughter might be autistic in some way. 
  • olgadapolgaolgadapolga Forumite
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    jimbo6977 said:
    MalMonroe said:
    Hi, I am not trying to be disrespectful in any way but has anyone ever considered that your daughter could suffer from ADHD? It's very difficult to recognise and diagnose and adults can have it. 

    I only ask this because from what you have said, she does appear to display some of the symptoms, as per this link -

    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/symptoms/

    There is no shame in being diagnosed - at least I hope not because I was diagnosed myself last year at the grand old age of 70. Yes, at last. I was described as being a very intelligent woman (like your daughter, I am very bright academically) who also has ADHD. It very often isn't diagnosed at all, with people often being described as 'dizzy' and 'disorganised'. I'm happy to have finally been given a reason for my dizzy lifestyle!

    Think about it.

    Maybe it's time to start letting your daughter sort out her own problems now she's 20+ and also why not try to encourage better relationships with your neighbours at number 57? I only have 13 neighbours on the small crescent where I live and thank goodness we are all on friendly - although not overfriendly - terms.  
    I was about to ask whether the OP's daughter might be autistic in some way. 
    Not necessarily autism, other things like dyspraxia can cause people to be "disorganised". 
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