Voluntary redundancy

I was declined volontary redundancy from the store I was working in. The reasons were I had all the qualities to take the business forward, since then Ive worked a month over Xmas put back on furlough them moved to another store! Is it legal to decline a member of staff then transfer them to another store? 

Comments

  • It depends on what your employment contract says - if it says you could be asked to move to another store, then you have no comeback other than to resign.

    Are you in a union?
  • lincroft1710
    lincroft1710 Posts: 17,457
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    Voluntary redundancy has little or no legal standing. Employers are expected to try to retain employees, so denying you voluntary redundancy would hardly be classed as illegal
    If you are querying your Council Tax band would you please state whether you are in England, Scotland or Wales
  • Thrugelmir
    Thrugelmir Posts: 89,546
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    Read your employment contract.  May well be something you've agreed to. 
  • MalMonroe
    MalMonroe Posts: 5,783
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    Yes I think it is legal. When I left a job a few years ago I knew there were voluntary redundancies and applied for one. However, my boss had to agree to allow it first. I worked at a university and they had to ensure that the job was redundant and not the person. That is, they were not allowed to replace me in the job I'd been doing for a few years after I left. 

    I then used the money to go off to be a university student myself.

    However, in your case obviously your boss thought you were too valuable to lose! Don't knock it. You are obviously really well thought of and it seems to me that if you play your cards right you can ask for promotion and a rise, too at the new store.  I certainly wouldn't resign because it does sound like you're onto a winner with this boss who thinks highly of you. These are strange times and jobs aren't as plentiful as they once were. I'd hang on a bit and see what happens.

    If you are really unhappy you could resign. But why would you when you're doing so well?
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  • MalMonroe said:
    Yes I think it is legal. When I left a job a few years ago I knew there were voluntary redundancies and applied for one. However, my boss had to agree to allow it first. I worked at a university and they had to ensure that the job was redundant and not the person. That is, they were not allowed to replace me in the job I'd been doing for a few years after I left. 

    I then used the money to go off to be a university student myself.

    However, in your case obviously your boss thought you were too valuable to lose! Don't knock it. You are obviously really well thought of and it seems to me that if you play your cards right you can ask for promotion and a rise, too at the new store.  I certainly wouldn't resign because it does sound like you're onto a winner with this boss who thinks highly of you. These are strange times and jobs aren't as plentiful as they once were. I'd hang on a bit and see what happens.

    If you are really unhappy you could resign. But why would you when you're doing so well?
    Not necessarily. It could just as likely be that the OP has longer service and therefore a larger settlement than others who put themselves forward. My husband has an employee he is desperate to get rid of and though he is top of the list when using his company's redundancy criteria as soon as his length of service is added in he drops almost to the bottom.
  • Thrugelmir
    Thrugelmir Posts: 89,546
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    edited 17 April 2021 at 10:40PM
    MalMonroe said:
    Yes I think it is legal. When I left a job a few years ago I knew there were voluntary redundancies and applied for one. However, my boss had to agree to allow it first. I worked at a university and they had to ensure that the job was redundant and not the person. That is, they were not allowed to replace me in the job I'd been doing for a few years after I left. 

    I then used the money to go off to be a university student myself.

    However, in your case obviously your boss thought you were too valuable to lose! Don't knock it. You are obviously really well thought of and it seems to me that if you play your cards right you can ask for promotion and a rise, too at the new store.  I certainly wouldn't resign because it does sound like you're onto a winner with this boss who thinks highly of you. These are strange times and jobs aren't as plentiful as they once were. I'd hang on a bit and see what happens.

    If you are really unhappy you could resign. But why would you when you're doing so well?
    Not necessarily. It could just as likely be that the OP has longer service and therefore a larger settlement than others who put themselves forward. My husband has an employee he is desperate to get rid of and though he is top of the list when using his company's redundancy criteria as soon as his length of service is added in he drops almost to the bottom.
    If the matrix is broad enough.  Normally possible to weed people out. Often benefits from removing certain individuals from an organisation that extend beyond the pure financial. . 
  • sheslookinhot
    sheslookinhot Posts: 1,941
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    Not necessarily. It could just as likely be that the OP has longer service and therefore a larger settlement than others who put themselves forward. My husband has an employee he is desperate to get rid of and though he is top of the list when using his company's redundancy criteria as soon as his length of service is added in he drops almost to the bottom.
    In that situation, the selection  criteria is not being “managed”.
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