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Fence Post to create Support for Climbers Plan (with Pic)

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So, as you can see, the neighbours fences at the back in various states of disrepair are an eyesore. I have ordered three Fence Posts (2.7m) with metal plates and some postcrete. The plan is to put the three Fence posts at the back of the border - one  to support the sagging bamboo on the left, one in the middle and one next to the trampoline.. Drill three holes in each fence post and have some string running between the three posts. Then Plant climbers but I don't want anything that will damage the wall or neighbours fence (had to remove Ivy from neighbours fence). Is this plan foolproof for a novice? Do you think it would look good?

Question about fence post, do you think just using the metal plate and postcrete would support it even in high winds? Don't want it to collapse. I was thinking of having brackets that i could drill to the wall in addition, trouble is that at the base of the wall there seems to be more brickwork at the foundation so I don't think I could put the fence post flush to the wall. Any other tips welcome on this.

Finally, the fun part, what to plant? It gets the sun quite well on that back wall in the late morning, early afternoon. Want some of it or a lot of it to be evergreen so it gives respite from looking at the fences and flowers as much as possible, growing to 3 metres plus, low maintenance. I heard Clematis and Roses (rambling/climbing) are a good combo, might go for a good mixture of them? any other ideas welcome or specfic species. I like Red and pink, orange, purple, lilac (not yellow). Finally I am  a bit of a novice so foolproof is best.

Finally, feel free to criticise or point out any flaws in my plan. Would rather know now.

Thanks





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Comments

  • greenbee
    greenbee Posts: 16,290 Forumite
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    You'll need fence wire and tensioners rather than string if you want climbers to go up/along rather than pull it down. 

    I have this all along the boundary in front of my neighbour's fence. It also stops her fence panels falling into my garden when the wind blows like they used to (plus they are 9ft rather than 6ft). I also have them at the back where there was a 3ft fence - although there is an access track to the sewage tank between me and my neighbours there, it blocks the view of the side of their house. Or should mostly do this year, now that things have grown up. 

    I've indulged in lots of climbing roses which I'm training along the wires, as well as zig-zagging them up and down to fill the gaps. I also have jasmine, jasmine beesianum, a couple of different honeysuckles, lots of clematis (some of which cooperate, some of which die) and wisteria over the pergola on the patio. But I have a lot more to play with. 

    Generous Gardener is a lovely rose, seems to flower most of the year, is pink, and is fabulously scented. It seems to behave pretty well. 
  • united4ever
    united4ever Posts: 526 Forumite
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    Thanks Greenbee - how many lines of fence wire would you recommend - It's just for the upper 1.5 meters or so that i will want the climbers to be spreading and zig zagging etc. Bottom half will be just trying to get them up over the shrubs in front of them. I'll have a look at how to do the fence wires and tension.


  • greenbee
    greenbee Posts: 16,290 Forumite
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    You'll need wires low enough down for the climbers to be able to get up. I have 4 over 9ft. 
  • twopenny
    twopenny Posts: 5,916 Forumite
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    Star Jasmine is a trendy one out now and happily, is worth it's reputation. It grows up to 6ft at least. Quick growing, perfumed, evergreen.
    At Malmaison, Empress Josephines garden they achieve this which is pretty impressive.

    https://stevewhysall.net/france-england-tour-2019-has-fabulous-unique-itinerary/malmaison-3_thumb/

    Sorry about the bold type, no idea why it's doing this to me tonight but it is lovely. You need to ask or search for evergreen climbing roses and give a length but there are some very vigorous ones.



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  • Farway
    Farway Posts: 13,533 Forumite
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    You could also consider fruit on the wires, chance your luck with a named grape, or maybe a thornless blackberry?
    I can recommend Merton Thornless blackberry,not quite evergreen but the leaves do hang on, blossom is beautiful & the berries are superb as well

    For a touch of exotic try training a fig along there, not evergreen but has very large leaves and given the position you could be having fresh figs in a few years
    Eight out of ten owners who expressed a preference said their cats preferred other peoples gardens
  • united4ever
    united4ever Posts: 526 Forumite
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    Any recommendations on wire and tensioners. Looking at some of the products and there is a lot out there and some if the kits are quite pricey. Any recommendations?
  • Davesnave
    Davesnave Posts: 34,741 Forumite
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    At my place, I bored large holes through fence posts, concreted them in, ran 40mm nylon rope through the holes and then grew vines along the swags of rope. Jute rope might be environmentally better, but it will rot in a few years. At a chandlers, the two types look almost identical.
    It's gone well, barring 3 accidents over the years with Tesco delivery trucks headed for next door. I have now  replaced the end one with a massive rock! :D
  • Farway
    Farway Posts: 13,533 Forumite
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    Davesnave said:
    At my place, I bored large holes through fence posts, concreted them in, ran 40mm nylon rope through the holes and then grew vines along the swags of rope. Jute rope might be environmentally better, but it will rot in a few years. At a chandlers, the two types look almost identical.
    It's gone well, barring 3 accidents over the years with Tesco delivery trucks headed for next door. I have now  replaced the end one with a massive rock! :D
    Rope rose swags were in all the designer's dreams,  even on Gardeners' World, very trendy.

    Eight out of ten owners who expressed a preference said their cats preferred other peoples gardens
  • united4ever
    united4ever Posts: 526 Forumite
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    Davesnave said:
    At my place, I bored large holes through fence posts, concreted them in, ran 40mm nylon rope through the holes and then grew vines along the swags of rope. Jute rope might be environmentally better, but it will rot in a few years. At a chandlers, the two types look almost identical.
    It's gone well, barring 3 accidents over the years with Tesco delivery trucks headed for next door. I have now  replaced the end one with a massive rock! :D
    Thanks, the nylon or jute option sounds much easier and cheaper than these trellis kits.
  • united4ever
    united4ever Posts: 526 Forumite
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    Got the metal plates for the fence post now. I can only dig a bit before I hit bumpy rock. What's the best way to get this level? Put a thin layer of soil and level it up using a spirit level and then pour in the postcrete? Will that be a string enough base in a storm if it is holding up a 2.7m fence post with climbers attached? Maybe it is too shallow. I could drill screws into that rock but then it would be hard to get straight. Because it is not flush to the wall I don't think I can use wall brackets higher up to have further support. Do you think the shallow base and postcrete will suffice? 
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