Noticed some changes? You can read all about the improvements we've made on the Forum in our latest announcement. We also have a new set of Forum rules so please take the time to give them a read and familiarise yourself.

Damp / mould in bedroom

I have a problem with a small amount of mould in our main bedroom. Its a semi detached house with 3 external walls, and the bedrooms are on the outside. The bedroom is on the first floor, and it’s in the top corner and bottom corner of the wall. (See photos) and the red is corner where the damp is.

I’ve had a look outside and the gutters aren’t leaking, but I am not sure why this is only at the top and bottom of the wall. The wall is very very cold to touch, I doubt there is any cavity wall insulation. I have someone coming over in the next few weeks to look at putting cavity in. The windows are double glazed, but pretty old. They get terrible condensation on them when the weather outside is very cold. The bedroom we sleep in is the worse, this is the one in the photos.

anyone for any ideas as to what this may be? I think It may be condensation on the wall where they are so cold.



Replies

  • neilmclneilmcl Forumite
    18.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Assuming that this is on the exterior facing wall then it's more than likely just down to condensation, ie, warm air condensing on the cold surface of the external wall, and with a lack of ventilation in that area mould will inevitably appear. Do you have a wardrobe up against that corner?

  • edited 31 January at 9:57PM
    Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
    3.5K Posts
    1,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 31 January at 9:57PM
    Hi Diego.


    Yes, almost certainly it's condensation, certainly at the bottom since it clearly isn't 'rising' damp. The reason why it's at the top and bottom and in the corner is most likely because that's where the least air flow takes place.

    After you've read the other thread and worked out if there are simple no-cost alternations you can make (and I bet there are) you could also consider something along the lines of what you have in mind - increasing the insulation levels in the room. I am pretty certain, tho', that 'cavity' insulation will not transform your situation - it might help (and with heat loss in general) - but it usually isn't 'transformative'.

    The single best way to transform the insulation value of these external walls is by adding a layer of insulation to the inside surface, using Thermal Laminate Board - which is insulated plasterboard. Any thickness will help a lot - even 1". Go for 2" if you can afford to lose the internal space.

    This would be bonded to your walls, and then skimmed to give a perfect finish. It'll really tidy up your room as well - smooth flat walls, sharp corners - a double-whammy.

    By all means consider cavity insulation too, but read up comprehensively about the pros and cons of doing this. Internal insulation will be very effective in transforming the insulation value of your walls, and carries no drawbacks that I'm aware of - except cost, but even that shouldn't be excessive. HOWEVER, you will still get condensation on your windows and any other cold surfaces unless you also change your heating/ventilation habits, but the room will be much easier to heat.

    That fact your windows are also getting condensation on them is no great surprise - they are usually the coldest surfaces in any room, whether they are old DG or new. Regardless of what you do to add insulation to the walls, you will still have to alter your routine to either prevent the damp air getting into the bedrooms in the first place, or to vent away the damp air once it's in. Actually, both :-)  


  • DavidJonasDavidJonas Forumite
    118 Posts
    Ninth Anniversary 10 Posts Combo Breaker
    When we moved into our house (8 years ago now), there was a lot of mould in some places. All under the wallpaper in the external walls of one room for a start (yuk).

    It was definitely condensation. House had been thoroughly insulated, double glazed etc and there was nowhere for the moisture to escape. No trickle vents etc.

    We had a positive input ventilation unit added to the loft and this solved most of the problem in our case. Other, cheaper ways to do it maybe. We still get the odd bit of mould growth - in a kitchen corner behind the bin and behind the curtains where they bunch up against the exterior wall. A combination of poor air movement and high moisture I suppose.
  • diego_94diego_94 Forumite
    95 Posts
    Eighth Anniversary 10 Posts Combo Breaker
    Thanks for the updates. There is no wardrobe in the corner. The unit you see in the photo of the bottom of the wall is a bedside table. 
    The windows currently have no trickle vents, we are seriously considering getting these replaced this year, as the house has been really cold this winter. Think we have noticed it more as we have been working at home.
  • edited 1 February at 10:32AM
    Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
    3.5K Posts
    1,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 1 February at 10:32AM
    Just think of all the extra moisture that's produced by being at home all day! Endless cuppas, warm sweaty bodies, heating on all day which holds all that extra water - until it finds somewhere cold to condense out on.

    Do you use the bedroom during the day? If so, you probably have the heating on so that should help. I'd also leave the door open so allow air to circulate. (You could crack open a window as well, but you might not want to if it's chilly...).

    If you DON'T use that room, then turn off (or right down) the heating in there, definitely crack open a window or two to 'vent' setting at least, and SHUT the bedroom door to stop warm air getting in there from the rest of the house. Let that room ventilate thoroughly - that should help a lot.

    I'm a bit concerned by the upper mouldy patch - it starts under that strange raised part of the wall - what is that raised white bit? And why doesn't it also have mould - it 'should'!

    I fear that new windows ain't going to fix this issue, and certainly won't miraculously make your bedroom suddenly warm - that's going to need insulation, I suspect. What age is the house? What type of construction? What's that raised bit?!




  • diego_94diego_94 Forumite
    95 Posts
    Eighth Anniversary 10 Posts Combo Breaker
    Jeepers_Creepers said:
    Just think of all the extra moisture that's produced by being at home all day! Endless cuppas, warm sweaty bodies, heating on all day which holds all that extra water - until it finds somewhere cold to condense out on.

    Do you use the bedroom during the day? If so, you probably have the heating on so that should help. I'd also leave the door open so allow air to circulate. (You could crack open a window as well, but you might not want to if it's chilly...).

    If you DON'T use that room, then turn off (or right down) the heating in there, definitely crack open a window or two to 'vent' setting at least, and SHUT the bedroom door to stop warm air getting in there from the rest of the house. Let that room ventilate thoroughly - that should help a lot.

    I'm a bit concerned by the upper mouldy patch - it starts under that strange raised part of the wall - what is that raised white bit? And why doesn't it also have mould - it 'should'!

    I fear that new windows ain't going to fix this issue, and certainly won't miraculously make your bedroom suddenly warm - that's going to need insulation, I suspect. What age is the house? What type of construction? What's that raised bit?!




    The raised white bit is coving, the runs all the way around the room. When I feel this it isnt cold as the wall.
    The house was built in the 70's, and I assume this is cavity wall. And not sure if there is current insultaion in place, there is no evidence of it, and we didnt get any type of cert when we purchased a few years ago. I spoke to a installer around the corner last month when he was doing another house, and he said in his experience, none of the houses on the estate had cavity wall insultaion. He had done a few.
    I have got a survey in a few weeks from a cavity wall insulation company, so will see what they say.
    I should not that there is a bit of mould in the other bedroom on the other side of the house, in exactly the same places in the outside corner. its not as bad though as we dont sleep in that room.
  • SupersonosSupersonos Forumite
    1.1K Posts
    1,000 Posts Third Anniversary Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭
    You just need to get some ventilation in there.  Crack open the windows for a period each day.
  • edited 1 February at 1:25PM
    Jeepers_CreepersJeepers_Creepers Forumite
    3.5K Posts
    1,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 1 February at 1:25PM
    diego_94 said:
    The raised white bit is coving, the runs all the way around the room. When I feel this it isnt cold as the wall.
    The house was built in the 70's, and I assume this is cavity wall. And not sure if there is current insultaion in place, there is no evidence of it, and we didnt get any type of cert when we purchased a few years ago. I spoke to a installer around the corner last month when he was doing another house, and he said in his experience, none of the houses on the estate had cavity wall insultaion. He had done a few.
    I have got a survey in a few weeks from a cavity wall insulation company, so will see what they say.
    I should not that there is a bit of mould in the other bedroom on the other side of the house, in exactly the same places in the outside corner. its not as bad though as we dont sleep in that room.

    Ah! It looked 'flat' in the photo - I can now see it's coving :-)  

    I know it would be disruptive, but is it not worth also getting a quote from a plasterer to board the insides of the two external walls and skim? The existing wall finish looks a bit ropey if you don't mind me saying... There's paper on all the walls, some of which has been painted over?

    Armed with quotes, you can then decide.

    (See if you can find a similar property nearby which has had 'cavity' done, and have a S-D chat with the owner about how successful it's been)

    The big pluses of 'cavity' - if it's suitable for your type of house - is the lack of internal disruption and that fact the whole house will be done. Could you join a local Facebook page - ask for folk's experience of cavity insulation?
Sign In or Register to comment.
Latest News and Guides

New plastic £50 note in circulation

Inventor and codebreaker Alan Turing is pictured

MSE News

TV MoneySaving tricks

How to save on Sky, Netflix, Now TV, Prime Video and more

MSE Guides

Pret subscription loophole

Get a month's worth of free smoothies, frappes, coffee etc

MSE Deals