Ebay seller sending pirate copy DVDs

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  • mnbvcxzmnbvcxz Forumite
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    GS.. said:
    It's true that movies over 50 years old have no copyright 
    I'm really not sure that is true in the UK. Unless all the principal creators died more than 50 years ago. Which would be very rare. I would.welcome being corrected though. It's a complicated system.
  • edited 19 October 2020 at 11:49AM
    IvanOpinionIvanOpinion Forumite
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    edited 19 October 2020 at 11:49AM
    GS.. said:
    If you disable someones computer and only THEN (when you have them over a barrel) decide to police them, you should expect the worse. I guess you also drive down the third lane of the motorway at 70 mph. Most people don't like self appointed policemen so you already know it leads to a very acrimonious life.

    ......
    As someone who used to help sell/build/repair/maintain PCs I used to take occasional abuse from people when I refused to re-install any software that they could not verify they had a licence for ...

    Every computer I have returned was working 100% so why you felt the need to make something up about disabling I really don't know (apart from it seems to be an internet thing, when you have no knowledge, just make something up).  Not sure what motorway driving has to do with fixing a computer ... do you think maybe I fix computers when driving, or maybe I fly down the motorway to different jobs, or maybe it is a technique to make the hard disk spin faster or maybe I set it on the car roof to blow dust from it????

    Who is policing? I am just abiding by the law - those with low or flexible moral standards will struggle to understand that.  Let's do a better comparison, would you walk into a shop and steal something because somebody asked you to? I have higher standards than that and fortunately the courts agree with me.

    You need to read your own signature.

    Don't waste time on other peoples first world problems
  • TakmonTakmon Forumite
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    hybernia said:
    eBay UK is riddled with dVD and software piracy, and has been for years. eBay seemingly prefers to do nothing about it because to come down hard on such sellers is to deny eBay its lucrative commission rates and the profitability of its business model.

    It's all especially noticeable in software sales, where there's instance after instance of eBay sellers getting hold of free public domain programs like GIMP and flogging 'em as if they're commercial offerings. The same blatant thievery and fraud also affects year-dated Ashampoo free-to-use products (German developer Ashampoo distinguishes between its freeware and paid-for offerings by allocating a year number to an item's title to indicate it's free, but a version number to a paid-for product).
    Go on eBay at any time and you'll find Ashampoo free product 2018 or free product 2019 or even (bless!) "the latest 2020" product being charged for by a seller in a deliberate mis-selling that eBay will surely by now be all too well aware of.
    As for the sheer number of overseas sellers from well known counterfeit markets like Morocco and Ukraine, they're all still in the business of crack'd and stolen software because they're still able to get away with citing fictitious UK addresses.

    I can't believe how many people seem to pay for free software on eBay when looking at how many items an item has been sold. But i think the people buying it are partly to blame because that have obviously made no effort at all to look up the software before buying it. 
  • accorianaccorian Forumite
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    Takmon said:
    hybernia said:
    eBay UK is riddled with dVD and software piracy, and has been for years. eBay seemingly prefers to do nothing about it because to come down hard on such sellers is to deny eBay its lucrative commission rates and the profitability of its business model.

    It's all especially noticeable in software sales, where there's instance after instance of eBay sellers getting hold of free public domain programs like GIMP and flogging 'em as if they're commercial offerings. The same blatant thievery and fraud also affects year-dated Ashampoo free-to-use products (German developer Ashampoo distinguishes between its freeware and paid-for offerings by allocating a year number to an item's title to indicate it's free, but a version number to a paid-for product).
    Go on eBay at any time and you'll find Ashampoo free product 2018 or free product 2019 or even (bless!) "the latest 2020" product being charged for by a seller in a deliberate mis-selling that eBay will surely by now be all too well aware of.
    As for the sheer number of overseas sellers from well known counterfeit markets like Morocco and Ukraine, they're all still in the business of crack'd and stolen software because they're still able to get away with citing fictitious UK addresses.

    I can't believe how many people seem to pay for free software on eBay when looking at how many items an item has been sold. But i think the people buying it are partly to blame because that have obviously made no effort at all to look up the software before buying it. 
    It can also be that someone unfamiliar with eBay and its deceptions chances upon a listing and rushes to buy because they think what they're looking at is a genuine bargain that won't be around for much longer. Having thrown caution to the wind, they now throw money at stuff that actually costs nothing.
    As the earlier poster said, it's especially noticeable in the computer software section of eBay, where fraudulent listings for "photo-editing software" abound. I have reported such listings as and when over the past couple of years but have now given up.
    One day eBay itself is going to find itself on the wrong end of a legal action by a major business able to claim that eBay's inertia actually helps scammers and fraudsters to thrive, and that eBay is therefore as much a party to a deception as those of criminal intent. Serve it right if/when Adobe flexes its muscles.

  • accorianaccorian Forumite
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    mnbvcxz said:
    GS.. said:
    It's true that movies over 50 years old have no copyright 
    I'm really not sure that is true in the UK. Unless all the principal creators died more than 50 years ago. Which would be very rare. I would.welcome being corrected though. It's a complicated system.
    You're right. The 'movies more than 50 years old have no copyright' is one of those daft assertions made by the unthinking on the unthinking mass audience platform of so-called 'social media'.
    Movie-making hasn't been a one-person enterprise since D W Griffith's childhood but the product of a collective of creators who copyright Law legitimately counts as including everyone who contributed to the screenplay, the producer or production company which bought and owns the rights to a third party book play or short story on which the movie was based, and the director.

    All -- not merely just one -- of these creators need to have been dead for up to 95 years from the date that their collective work was first copyrighted (i.e., on initial release) before their movie can be said to have lost copyright protection and entered "the public domain" .




  • TakmonTakmon Forumite
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    accorian said:

    Takmon said:
    hybernia said:
    eBay UK is riddled with dVD and software piracy, and has been for years. eBay seemingly prefers to do nothing about it because to come down hard on such sellers is to deny eBay its lucrative commission rates and the profitability of its business model.

    It's all especially noticeable in software sales, where there's instance after instance of eBay sellers getting hold of free public domain programs like GIMP and flogging 'em as if they're commercial offerings. The same blatant thievery and fraud also affects year-dated Ashampoo free-to-use products (German developer Ashampoo distinguishes between its freeware and paid-for offerings by allocating a year number to an item's title to indicate it's free, but a version number to a paid-for product).
    Go on eBay at any time and you'll find Ashampoo free product 2018 or free product 2019 or even (bless!) "the latest 2020" product being charged for by a seller in a deliberate mis-selling that eBay will surely by now be all too well aware of.
    As for the sheer number of overseas sellers from well known counterfeit markets like Morocco and Ukraine, they're all still in the business of crack'd and stolen software because they're still able to get away with citing fictitious UK addresses.

    I can't believe how many people seem to pay for free software on eBay when looking at how many items an item has been sold. But i think the people buying it are partly to blame because that have obviously made no effort at all to look up the software before buying it. 
    It can also be that someone unfamiliar with eBay and its deceptions chances upon a listing and rushes to buy because they think what they're looking at is a genuine bargain that won't be around for much longer. Having thrown caution to the wind, they now throw money at stuff that actually costs nothing.


    This doesn't just apply to eBay thought the same line of thinking applies to all shopping and when looking at a bargain people should always think "can i get this cheaper elsewhere". Considering that shopping on eBay involves shopping online there really is no excuse for people not to do some research before buying something. 
  • edited 24 October 2020 at 12:28PM
    [Deleted User][Deleted User]
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    edited 24 October 2020 at 12:28PM
    I have bought older movies/series on ebay and Amazon.  Only one was a replica (and it didn't work), seller offered a refund immediately.  I tend to prefer to buy on Amazon though or from a seller like Music Magpie I know is less likely to stock replicas.  I always look carefully at a listing for signs of expected wear etc.  Its usually easy to spot the fakes.  But I did pay quite a price to buy a complete series and when the item turned up the box was a lot more worn than the pictures showed but discs were in good shape.

    But it has to be said, quite often you can go to Youtube and watch/listen to the item for free lol.  
  • Mickey666Mickey666 Forumite
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    accorian said:
    mnbvcxz said:
    GS.. said:
    It's true that movies over 50 years old have no copyright 
    I'm really not sure that is true in the UK. Unless all the principal creators died more than 50 years ago. Which would be very rare. I would.welcome being corrected though. It's a complicated system.
    You're right. The 'movies more than 50 years old have no copyright' is one of those daft assertions made by the unthinking on the unthinking mass audience platform of so-called 'social media'.
    Movie-making hasn't been a one-person enterprise since D W Griffith's childhood but the product of a collective of creators who copyright Law legitimately counts as including everyone who contributed to the screenplay, the producer or production company which bought and owns the rights to a third party book play or short story on which the movie was based, and the director.

    All -- not merely just one -- of these creators need to have been dead for up to 95 years from the date that their collective work was first copyrighted (i.e., on initial release) before their movie can be said to have lost copyright protection and entered "the public domain" .





    Isn't there also something about copyright on a new 'creation' based on out-of-copyright works?
    Eg, All of Shakespeare's works (for example) must be out of copyright now, but that doesn't mean a recently published book of, say, Macbeth is copyright-free because the book itself is a new 'creation'.  Thus, photocopying the book would be a copyright offence even if the play itself was out of copyright. 
    I'm not entirely sure though, but if correct, could the copying of a DVD containing an out-of-copyright movie still be a copyright offence against the creator of the origina DVD?
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