New Post Advanced Search

Slanting radiator pipes

10 replies 284 views
Hi all,

I have an issue in a bedroom where one of the radiators has slanting pipes coming up from the floor. These are the chrome pipes attached to the radiator valves.
I have attached some pictures to this so hopefully you can see what the issue is. It obviously looks unsightly. Is there a bendable chrome pipe or pipe connectors that can make this look a little less ugly?  Or do you think I just need to use new brackets for the radiators so they sit more flush to the wall and allow the pipes to bend back a bit?

Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
IMG-20200730-WA0006jpg IMG-20200730-WA0004jpg
 


Read more: https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/slanting-radiator-pipes.550323/#ixzz6UB5RZw5G

Replies

  • grumblergrumbler Forumite
    53.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    It's a copper pipe, chrome plated. So, yes, a skilful plumber can bend it. However, I don't understand why it has to be chrome, not white. If you are happy with white, you can replace it with a plastic pipe that is far more flexible.
    We are born naked, wet and hungry...Then things get worse. :(

    .withdrawal, NOT withdrawel ..bear with me, NOT bare with me
    .definitely, NOT definately ......separate, NOT seperate
    should have, NOT should of
    .....guaranteed, NOT guarenteed
  • greyteam1959greyteam1959 Forumite
    3.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    I agree with the OP......looks awful.
    Might depend on what the floor is made of as to what you could do.

  • neroxnerox Forumite
    127 posts
    Sixth Anniversary 100 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    To fox that you would need to cut the pipe under the floor and remake the connection straight, not a difficult task but is it a show house ?
    Pay off all debt by Xmas 2020 #144 £1,100 to go!
    £10k Emergency fund  
    Mortgage Targets
    < £120,000 by 01/01/2022
    < £90,000 by 01/01/2023
    < £60,000 by 01/01/2024
    < £30,000 by 01/01/2025
    £0 by 01/01/2026
  • ariba10ariba10 Forumite
    5.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    I would think there is a Joist or something similar directly under the floorboards that made the installer plumb it in that way.
    I used to be indecisive but now I am not sure.
  • edited 5 August at 3:49PM
    Mistral001Mistral001 Forumite
    4.7K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper I've been Money Tipped!
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 5 August at 3:49PM
    grumbler said:
    It's a copper pipe, chrome plated. So, yes, a skilful plumber can bend it. However, I don't understand why it has to be chrome, not white. If you are happy with white, you can replace it with a plastic pipe that is far more flexible.
    It is copper, but surely bending it after it has been chromed will result in damage to the chrome plating. 

    PS.  The pipes under the floor are likely to be plastic if it is a recent installation.  If that is the case, by making the notch in the boards bigger and loosening the valve fitting at the radiator, the chrome plated section of pipe can be swung round to the vertical. You will not have to disconnect any pipe.  
  • nofoollikeoldnofoollikeold Forumite
    313 posts
    Tenth Anniversary 100 Posts
    ✭✭
    1. In my opinion its highly likely that ariba10 is correct, particularly if the radiator is in a bay. 
    2. If there is a joist running close to the wall the original installer would have had no choice but to either notch the joist (dodgy in many circumstances), push the pipes up between the joist and the wall as has been done, or chase the pipes into the wall, which makes installing or changing the radiator more difficult.
    3. It is possible to bend chrome plated copper pipe, BUT:
    3a. No more than the slightest curve.
    3b. The curve required to bring those pipe up to vertical would be too tight for the chrome to survive.
    4. You could get copper pipes bent up and then chrome plated, but it is extremely expensive (£100 + ?) 
    5. Personally, I'd live with it, but if SWMBO insisted, I'd chase them into the wall, and replace the valves if necessary.
    6. If you move the radiator closer to the wall, you will lose some of the convection effect which provides 85% of the heat output from a "radiator".

  • Mickey666Mickey666 Forumite
    1.1K posts
    1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭
    Blimey - I've got walls that are wonkier than that pipe.  I'd leave it well alone and just call it 'character' :D
  • ComicGeekComicGeek Forumite
    680 posts
    500 Posts Third Anniversary Name Dropper
    ✭✭
    More likely that there was an original radiator there that was slimmer - then it got replaced with a deeper radiator and the pipework connection was just bodged.

    If it's not leaking, I would just leave it.
  • Rosa_DamascenaRosa_Damascena Forumite
    1.8K posts
    1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭
    ComicGeek said:
    More likely that there was an original radiator there that was slimmer - then it got replaced with a deeper radiator and the pipework connection was just bodged.

    If it's not leaking, I would just leave it.
    A slant like that would make me suspicious of what lurks beneath though, ie is the connection to the underfloor pipes reliable?

    This might be a particular problem if the OP is new to the property and has not had cause to use the radiators as yet.
    No man is worth crawling on this earth.

    So much to read, so little time.
  • travis-powerstravis-powers Forumite
    146 posts
    Part of the Furniture 100 Posts Name Dropper
    ComicGeek said:
    More likely that there was an original radiator there that was slimmer - then it got replaced with a deeper radiator and the pipework connection was just bodged.

    If it's not leaking, I would just leave it.
    A slant like that would make me suspicious of what lurks beneath though, ie is the connection to the underfloor pipes reliable?

    This might be a particular problem if the OP is new to the property and has not had cause to use the radiators as yet.
    Rosa is spot on with this! No plumber would use ptfe on a compression joint no Plummer would use an isolation valve on a radiator! Speaking as a carpenter notching out for pipe is fine!
    Maybe, just once, someone will call me 'Sir' without adding, 'You're making a scene.'
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support