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Shared Access

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Silverback_TCSilverback_TC Forumite
3 posts
First Post
Hello, i was looking for some advice. I own a drive which my neighbour has shared access,, they can use it to drive up to their part of the drive. I have a turning area, which they often park in, and this hinders turning, after speaking with them, they have parked there less.

Now, they have advised me that they plan to run a business from home and they are expecting more visitors, but they only have sufficient parking for themselves.

Whilst I feel petty about protecting my turning area, it makes my life easier, and I own it. I am not keen on their customers using this to park, or the additional traffic which will mean my driveway gets more use than normal. In the deeds, it clearly states they are required to pay a reasonable sum to have access.

Can I request that their business clients do not pass over my drive?

Thanks in advance

Replies

  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
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    What is the exact wording of their right of way over your land?
  • EdGasketTheSecondEdGasketTheSecond Forumite
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    Why do they use your part of the drive? Where are they supposed to park? Not enough information. Can you put a lockable post up to secure your area?
  • George_MichaelGeorge_Michael Forumite
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    If you can't come to some sort of amicable arrangement with your neighbour then it might be worth contacting your local council as there may well be local restrictions regarding running a business from a residential property especially if parking or access causes problems to other residents.
  • MinuteNoodlesMinuteNoodles Forumite
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    Now, they have advised me that they plan to run a business from home and they are expecting more visitors, but they only have sufficient parking for themselves.

    They'll need planning permission/change of use to run a business from their home that has clients visiting in a residential area.

  • Silverback_TCSilverback_TC Forumite
    3 posts
    First Post
    thanks all, i will get the exact wording, I have also recently found out that they need permission from the local council if receiving visitors, and i assume that is the time to appeal. 
    To answer the other question, they own a drive which fits two cars outside their house, and this is accessed via my drive. 
  • Silverback_TCSilverback_TC Forumite
    3 posts
    First Post
    Hi all, the wording is as follows: The full right to pass and repair with or in vehicles along part of the driveway cross hatched on the plan as forms part of the property and serves the neighbouring premises psrt of the estate subject to payment from time to time of a fair proportion of the expense of cleaning maintaining and repairing the same.



  • EctophileEctophile Forumite
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    There's nothing in that allowing them to park on your land.  Only that they are allowed to come and go as they like.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • AretnapAretnap Forumite
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    Hi all, the wording is as follows: The full right to pass and repair with or in vehicles along part of the driveway cross hatched on the plan as forms part of the property and serves the neighbouring premises psrt of the estate subject to payment from time to time of a fair proportion of the expense of cleaning maintaining and repairing the same.
    I assume that you mean "pass and repass" and that autocorrect mangled it?
    If so the right to pass and repass means your neighbour (and generally his guests) has the right to drive over the land on his way to and from some other destination (his own parking area, presumably); but it confers no right to park on the land.
  • EctophileEctophile Forumite
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    I looked up "repair" on Wiktionary.  Apparently, "repair to" is an archaic way of saying "go back to".  Lawyers do like to use pointlessly florid language to confuse the mere mortals.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
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