Forum Home » Motoring

Parking Rules - Blocking Driveway Etc

New Post Advanced Search

Coronavirus: The latest from MSE


The MSE team is working extremely hard to keep the info we have about your travel rights, cancellation rights, sick pay (and more) up to date.
The official MSE guides: UPDATED MSE Coronavirus Guides

NEWSFLASH


New, free ‘Academoney’ course from MSE and the Open University launches
All the key areas of personal finance are covered, so that you can master your money decisions


Parking Rules - Blocking Driveway Etc

9 replies 753 views
ChrishazleChrishazle Forumite
591 posts
Eighth Anniversary 500 Posts
✭✭
I've seen a number of threads on here about parking problems, and saw this item today about the law, so thought I'd post it for referenece.
FYI I've had a discussion with Kent Police about people parking across the dropped kerb access to my garage, and providing it's blocking my access to the road (and not blocking getting my car back into my garage) it confirms what they told me - but don't expect quick reaction if some inconsiderate clown blocks you getting to the road!!

Replies

  • JumblebumbleJumblebumble Forumite
    768 posts
    500 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭✭
    I've seen a number of threads on here about parking problems, and saw this item today about the law, so thought I'd post it for referenece.
    FYI I've had a discussion with Kent Police about people parking across the dropped kerb access to my garage, and providing it's blocking my access to the road (and not blocking getting my car back into my garage) it confirms what they told me - but don't expect quick reaction if some inconsiderate clown blocks you getting to the road!!

    My understanding is that this is different in London where the council can and will ticket cars in front of dropped Kerbs if the resident requests
  • EdGasketTheSecondEdGasketTheSecond Forumite
    2.1K posts
    1,000 Posts Third Anniversary Photogenic Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    It's about time the law was updated to make it an offence to park on someone else's driveway without permission.
    Yes the council can ticket cars but that doesn't get the car moved. Is it still the case that if you are completely blocked in then the police should come and remove the car?
  • Paula_SmithPaula_Smith Forumite
    179 posts
    Sixth Anniversary 100 Posts
    We are in South London, near a school so we have plenty of "its ok I am only dropping the kids off".
    No - its not OK - I need to go out.
    But we do have a phone number for the local council and they have sent someone out pretty quickly to issue tickets.
  • frayedknotfrayedknot Forumite
    35 posts
    Sixth Anniversary 10 Posts Combo Breaker
    It's about time the law was updated to make it an offence to park on someone else's driveway without permission.
    Yes the council can ticket cars but that doesn't get the car moved. Is it still the case that if you are completely blocked in then the police should come and remove the car?
    No-ones parking on someone else's driveway. The road is a public space and isn't part of your driveway, even if you've got a dropped kerb.

  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
    30.2K posts
    10,000 Posts Seventh Anniversary Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    It's about time the law was updated to make it an offence to park on someone else's driveway without permission.
    Yes the council can ticket cars but that doesn't get the car moved. Is it still the case that if you are completely blocked in then the police should come and remove the car?
    And how will the law differentiate between "someone else's driveway" and, say, the car park of a block of flats. Or a supermarket. Or an office building?

    Because the last changes to the law covering unauthorised parking on private land (which covers all of those scenarios and more) saw the actions available to landowners severely restricted. Clamping is illegal. Towing is illegal. All you can now do is send a snottogram with a bill, and even then every single I has to be dotted and T crossed, with more signage than you can shake a now-redundant wheelclamp at.
  • DoaMDoaM Forumite
    10.2K posts
    10,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    AdrianC said:
    Because the last changes to the law covering unauthorised parking on private land (which covers all of those scenarios and more) saw the actions available to landowners severely restricted.
    Clamping is the reason why the law was changed ... landowners weren't doing the clamping - it was being subcontracted to borderline criminal gangs who made up a number and threatened violence against people refusing to pay to get clamps removed.
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
    30.2K posts
    10,000 Posts Seventh Anniversary Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    DoaM said:
    AdrianC said:
    Because the last changes to the law covering unauthorised parking on private land (which covers all of those scenarios and more) saw the actions available to landowners severely restricted.
    Clamping is the reason why the law was changed ... landowners weren't doing the clamping - it was being subcontracted to borderline criminal gangs who made up a number and threatened violence against people refusing to pay to get clamps removed.
    There should be a law against demanding money with threats of violence!

    Whether it's subcontracted or not is irrelevant.
  • DoaMDoaM Forumite
    10.2K posts
    10,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Subcontracting is (was) entirely relevant ... if landowners had taken more care about who they subcontracted to then there may not have been a need to change the law. ;)
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
    30.2K posts
    10,000 Posts Seventh Anniversary Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    DoaM said:
    Subcontracting is (was) entirely relevant ... if landowners had taken more care about who they subcontracted to then there may not have been a need to change the law. ;)
    Taking more care over who you subcontract to is different from good subcontractors being inherently bad simply because they're subcontractors.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support