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Manual wash or Dishwasher? Here's a money saving tip to use less water manually.

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Water Bills
34 replies 4.7K views
Diego_FrancisDiego_Francis Forumite
29 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Water Bills
Added a poll just for curiosity's sake. Personally I don't understand why the average homeowner needs a dishwasher. You're using electricity to heat up water as well as water from your mains so you essentially have a secondary boiler in your house specifically for washing dishes that don't always do a great job at actually cleaning them.

Lately I've been trying to reduce the amount of water used when manually washing the dishes, in a sink.

I've come up with this strategy that may be good practice for those of you who need to get your water bills down.

Grab your kettle, pop it under the tap, now run the hot water tap.
Touch the tap and wait till it's hot. Once it is. Turn the tap off. You shouldn't have filled the kettle, in theory, but this may vary depending on how efficient your boiler is.

Now pop your kettle back on its plynth, or hob if you have one of those types, and set it off boiling.

Now the tricky part.

Get all your cutlery, drop it into the sink. Push the plug into the sinkhole.

Now starting with the glasses first, scrub with a scourer sponge the glasses with fairy liquid, or similar detergent, I use Aldi's own.

Next scrub the dishes, plates or mugs that have the least 'dirt' on them. Keep scrubbing in this order, from least 'dirty' to the 'dirtiest'. Leave pots and pans last.

So far you'll have soapy dishes that are quite messy and partially dry.
Now turn your hot water tap back on, let it trickle.
Now rinse the items you've just scrubbed and pop them in the drainer.
The rinsed soapy water should collect in the sink barely submerging your cutlery.

Now scrub your cutlery using this water to help remove the tough stains and 'dirt'.

Take them out of the sink and place your pans or pots in, run the tap again, let it trickle, rinse your cutlery and pop it in the drainer. Turn the tap off again.

Now your kettle has boiled, pour some detergent into the pot/ pan, give it a light scrub, best to use a second scourer dedicated to this part only, then pour in some of your boiled water.

Leave to soak for a bit. When you return, lift the pans out of the sink, scrub them clean and rinse with cold water until the bulk of the suds have come off. Pop upsidedown in your sink to drain or on your drainer if you have room.

Empty your water.

Now I know it comes over that I've just told you how to wash dishes and I know you're not a person who sucks eggs. The reason why I wrote it this way to hopefully ignite a little spark in that lightbulb of yours.

You've probably just realised that this method uses far less water. So much less than running the tap to get it warm - cold water wasted until heated up.
So much less than filling a sink - usually too much water which gets dirty fast which is essentially a bath of slime that your coating your dishes with.
So much less water than a dishwasher with far better results.

'But you're using a kettle which is no more efficient than using the heater in a dishwasher' yeah in theory you're right, however, that kettle of water shouldn't be full and whatever you have left over you can make yourself a brew or prep some noodles. Can't do that with dishwasher water.

From my own experience I've found by being stringent with how much water I use for washing up, it's actually made me realise how much I used to waste all the time.

Now I have trouble getting the rest of the family on board with this. Mainly because it's so tedious and anal but the good news is now that I'm insisting on doing the dishes myself, the misses can keep her feet up after dinnertime now so win win.

I don't have any figures or statics for savings made. Only been doing this for a month but I believe I am saving already. I'm not using the boiler for as long to heat up my water. I'm not wasting litres of water. And I'm utilising what water is usually wasted for other things.

Bonus, if you don't have heavily stained items to wash and don't fancy a brew, keep the water in the kettle for the next time you need hot water or just pour it over your plants etc. The above is just one example of many possibilities.

Post a comment and let this community know what you think and if you've saved money with this method. Hope it's not too painstaking for you to accomplish and more importantly I hope you do get money back. :beer:

Do you use a Dishwasher or do you manually wash your Dishes? 76 votes

Dishwasher
63% 48 votes
Manual Wash
36% 28 votes
«134

Replies

  • martinthebanditmartinthebandit Forumite
    4.4K posts
    Eighth Anniversary 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    No thanks, I think I'll stick with running the dishwasher once a day, it's more economical.

    If you don't find joy in the snow,
    remember you'll have less joy in your life


    ...but still have the same amount of snow!
  • matelodavematelodave Forumite
    5.1K posts
    Eighth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    I'm with Martin - life's too short to muck about washing dishes by hand
    Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large numbers
  • Alter_egoAlter_ego Forumite
    2.8K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Added a poll just for curiosity's sake. Personally I don't understand why the average homeowner needs a dishwasher. You're using electricity to heat up water as well as water from your mains so you essentially have a secondary boiler in your house specifically for washing dishes that don't always do a great job at actually cleaning them.

    Lately I've been trying to reduce the amount of water used when manually washing the dishes, in a sink.

    I've come up with this strategy that may be good practice for those of you who need to get your water bills down.

    Grab your kettle, pop it under the tap, now run the hot water tap.
    Touch the tap and wait till it's hot. Once it is. Turn the tap off. You shouldn't have filled the kettle, in theory, but this may vary depending on how efficient your boiler is.

    Now pop your kettle back on its plynth, or hob if you have one of those types, and set it off boiling.

    Now the tricky part.

    Get all your cutlery, drop it into the sink. Push the plug into the sinkhole.

    Now starting with the glasses first, scrub with a scourer sponge the glasses with fairy liquid, or similar detergent, I use Aldi's own.

    Next scrub the dishes, plates or mugs that have the least 'dirt' on them. Keep scrubbing in this order, from least 'dirty' to the 'dirtiest'. Leave pots and pans last.

    So far you'll have soapy dishes that are quite messy and partially dry.
    Now turn your hot water tap back on, let it trickle.
    Now rinse the items you've just scrubbed and pop them in the drainer.
    The rinsed soapy water should collect in the sink barely submerging your cutlery.

    Now scrub your cutlery using this water to help remove the tough stains and 'dirt'.

    Take them out of the sink and place your pans or pots in, run the tap again, let it trickle, rinse your cutlery and pop it in the drainer. Turn the tap off again.

    Now your kettle has boiled, pour some detergent into the pot/ pan, give it a light scrub, best to use a second scourer dedicated to this part only, then pour in some of your boiled water.

    Leave to soak for a bit. When you return, lift the pans out of the sink, scrub them clean and rinse with cold water until the bulk of the suds have come off. Pop upsidedown in your sink to drain or on your drainer if you have room.

    Empty your water.

    Now I know it comes over that I've just told you how to wash dishes and I know you're not a person who sucks eggs. The reason why I wrote it this way to hopefully ignite a little spark in that lightbulb of yours.

    You've probably just realised that this method uses far less water. So much less than running the tap to get it warm - cold water wasted until heated up.
    So much less than filling a sink - usually too much water which gets dirty fast which is essentially a bath of slime that your coating your dishes with.
    So much less water than a dishwasher with far better results.

    'But you're using a kettle which is no more efficient than using the heater in a dishwasher' yeah in theory you're right, however, that kettle of water shouldn't be full and whatever you have left over you can make yourself a brew or prep some noodles. Can't do that with dishwasher water.

    From my own experience I've found by being stringent with how much water I use for washing up, it's actually made me realise how much I used to waste all the time.

    Now I have trouble getting the rest of the family on board with this. Mainly because it's so tedious and anal but the good news is now that I'm insisting on doing the dishes myself, the misses can keep her feet up after dinnertime now so win win.

    I don't have any figures or statics for savings made. Only been doing this for a month but I believe I am saving already. I'm not using the boiler for as long to heat up my water. I'm not wasting litres of water. And I'm utilising what water is usually wasted for other things.

    Bonus, if you don't have heavily stained items to wash and don't fancy a brew, keep the water in the kettle for the next time you need hot water or just pour it over your plants etc. The above is just one example of many possibilities.

    Post a comment and let this community know what you think and if you've saved money with this method. Hope it's not too painstaking for you to accomplish and more importantly I hope you do get money back. :beer:

    We're you a Brownie?
    Loose means not tight, Lose means something is lost, simples no?
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
  • CardewCardew Forumite
    28K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Rampant Recycler
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    There have been loads of threads and many trials on the dishwasher v handwasher theme; and the overwhelming conclusion is that a full dishwasher is both cheaper and better.

    Also dishwashers are far more hygienic than washing by hand. They wash and rinse at 60C-65C and the contents come out spotless. Compare sparkling glasses with those hand washed.
  • Sea_ShellSea_Shell Forumite
    3.5K posts
    Fifth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Hung up my suit!
    ✭✭✭✭
    There's only the two of us and we wash by hand, but we don't faff about.

    We just run the hot tap till it's hot, fill the bowl and wash cleanest to dirtiest.

    We only wash up twice a day (we leave the evening sandwich plates and mugs till the morning!!)

    Works for us.
    " That pound I saved yesterday, is a pound I don't have to earn tomorrow ":beer: JOB DONE!!
    This should now read "It's time to start digging up those Squirrelled Nuts"!!! :j:j:j
  • cajefcajef Forumite
    5.7K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    Post a comment and let this community know what you think and if you've saved money with this method.

    Cannot be bothered with all that to maybe or maybe not save a few pence a day, far easier to put everything in the dishwasher and put on once a day and possibly more economical rather than wasting my time when I could be doing something else.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke. :|
  • ThemeOneThemeOne Forumite
    1.5K posts
    Part of the Furniture
    ✭✭✭
    I can do most of my hand washing up with cold water and a bit of washing up liquid.
  • POPPYOSCARPOPPYOSCAR Forumite
    14.3K posts
    Ninth Anniversary 10,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I tried it when the dishwasher broke down.

    Soon bought a new one.
  • Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
    3.2K posts
    1,000 Posts Fifth Anniversary
    ✭✭✭✭
    Added a poll just for curiosity's sake. Personally I don't understand why the average homeowner needs a dishwasher.

    It’s 2019.
    We no longer need a washboard and mangle for clothes or coal to heat a room & water either.
    We’ve evolved......
  • elsienelsien Forumite
    22.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Cardew wrote: »
    There have been loads of threads and many trials on the dishwasher v handwasher theme; and the overwhelming conclusion is that a full dishwasher is both cheaper and better.

    Also dishwashers are far more hygienic than washing by hand. They wash and rinse at 60C-65C and the contents come out spotless. Compare sparkling glasses with those hand washed.

    No room for a dishwasher so I don't have the option.
    I'd dispute the contents coming out spotless though; they certainly didn't with the one at work.
    Can't be doing with the OPs faffing around either though, for the small
    savings made. I'm with his family on that one.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
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