Running shoe sizing

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
10 replies 2.7K views
CarnmoreCarnmore Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Sports and Fitness MoneySaving
I recently started wearing Brooks Adrenaline GTS 19, initially standard D width but they skinned my little toe so sent them back and got 2E width.

I've always worn half a size bigger than my dress shoe size but have found that my toes are stubbing when running downhill with the big toe now being bruised.

Does this mean they're too big or too small? Does anyone wear a full size bigger in running shoes?

Replies

  • MovingForwardsMovingForwards Forumite
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    Have you thought about going to a proper running shop to get your feet measured, try on various trainers and see which ones are suited to you?

    You can then take that info and buy online from somewhere.
  • Sea_ShellSea_Shell Forumite
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    I'm a 5 1/2 to 6, in normal shoes, but I wear a 7 running shoe (ASICS), so yes.

    I also wear Thorlos run 10 socks which are quite thick and fluffy too.
    "It's time to start digging up those Squirrelled Nuts"!!!

    * I shall only get involved in new threads, once a dialogue has been established with the OP *
  • SweetPotatoPieSweetPotatoPie Forumite
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    If your toes are stubbing when you are running down hill then it seems as if they are too big? Your feet have room to push your toes to the front of the shoe causing them to hit on the front. This is how you’ll end up losing your toe nail! Happened to my daughter, more than once.
  • elsienelsien Forumite
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    Have you thought about going to a proper running shop to get your feet measured, try on various trainers and see which ones are suited to you?

    You can then take that info and buy online from somewhere.

    Proper running shops would be out of business fairly quickly if everyone did that. If someone is going to avail themselves of the expertise then they should really be buying from there as well.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • kerri_gtkerri_gt Forumite
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    How do the shoes fit when you're on the flat? Have you tried adjusting the lacing per the link below at all?

    https://runrepeat.com/top-10-running-shoe-lacing-techniques
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
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  • edited 29 July 2019 at 9:18PM
    rupertsruperts Forumite
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    edited 29 July 2019 at 9:18PM
    I went to a 'highly reputable' running shop and had the full works with the gait analysis and everything. A few weeks later after getting injured wearing the shoes they recommended, I saw a physio who could tell just by glancing at my feet that the running shop got the recommendation completely wrong.

    Just one person's experience of course, but it's enough for me to be convinced the whole running shop expertise thing is basically a marketing scam.

    Most people's feet are normal. Just go to an outlet shop and try on a load of neutral shoes and pick the one that is most comfortable. Then, if you feel pain when running, see a physio for free on the NHS and have them tell you whether or not you need a different type of shoe.

    I appreciate the above doesn't really answer OP's question, just felt the need to contribute.
  • edited 30 July 2019 at 2:01PM
    Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    edited 30 July 2019 at 2:01PM
    kerri_gt wrote: »
    How do the shoes fit when you're on the flat? Have you tried adjusting the lacing per the link below at all?

    https://runrepeat.com/top-10-running-shoe-lacing-techniques


    I would try this first before messing about trying different sizes.


    I use the lacing pattern for "Heel slipping". If you really tighten the last pull on the laces at the top just before tying the knot it effectively locks your heel into the back of the shoe and stops your foot slipping forwards. You have to experiment to get the tension just right - not too tight and not too loose.


    As another poster suggested, it may be (counter-intuitively), not that your shoe is too small, but that it's too long. If the shoe is the right size on the flat, then it probably is the right size.


    Try the heel slipping knot first, and only then try a bigger size. (And I would also recommend keeping the heel knot anyway - it really secures the shoe).


    EDIT: If you look carefully at the lace-holes you may find that the last one at the top looks a bit out of line from the others and a bit to the side. Many people don't use it because it's not clear what it's purpose is, but it's to allow you to thread the lace back through to do the heel slip knot.
  • Sea_ShellSea_Shell Forumite
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    Sea_Shell wrote: »
    I'm a 5 1/2 to 6, in normal shoes, but I wear a 7 running shoe (ASICS), so yes.

    I also wear Thorlos run 10 socks which are quite thick and fluffy too.

    I'd also add that it took me about 5 years and many different model shoes before i found the right ones for me. Blisters, shin splints, the works. Ended up with custom orthotics, with a neutral shoe. And yes, in my quest I'd been to specialist shops with gait analysis....which recommend the worst shoe ever for blisters.

    IME, it's trial and error. Get it wrong and it costs a bomb... in Physio!!!
    "It's time to start digging up those Squirrelled Nuts"!!!

    * I shall only get involved in new threads, once a dialogue has been established with the OP *
  • coffeehoundcoffeehound Forumite
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    kerri_gt wrote: »
    How do the shoes fit when you're on the flat? Have you tried adjusting the lacing per the link below at all?

    https://runrepeat.com/top-10-running-shoe-lacing-techniques
    I use the lacing pattern for "Heel slipping". If you really tighten the last pull on the laces at the top just before tying the knot it effectively locks your heel into the back of the shoe and stops your foot slipping forwards.

    Thanks for this. Just tried it with my Adidas running shoes and it feels a lot more secure than before.
  • edited 30 July 2019 at 9:52PM
    Manxman_in_exileManxman_in_exile Forumite
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    edited 30 July 2019 at 9:52PM
    At the risk of appearing to be some kind of shoe lacing nerd, I find this link on "lock lacing" a bit easier to follow than the other link on "heel slip". He also explains why it's more secure and the other benefits of this type of knot.


    https://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/locklacing.htm


    The link is very old, but it still seems to work. (I found it in my "Favourites from Work" folder and I retired seven years ago! Maybe I am a shoe lace nerd...you have to admit they are interesting...)


    EDIT: note at the end of that page he says lace locking can give a better fit, but if the shoes are the wrong size to begin with, they will stay the wrong size.


    Also, if you've got flat feet and/or knee problems it may be worth getting prescription orthotics from a podiatrist. (Another poster mentioned orthotics above). If you have a normal arch when your foot is unweighted, but the arch collapses when weighted, your foot can lengthen by over a shoe size. By supporting the arch, orthotics prevent this lengthening.


    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=6029384 (See my post #3)
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